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Splash Screen. Chapter Menu Chapter Preview Section 1: The Nature of Sport Section 2:Theoretical Perspectives and Sport Section 3: Social Issues in Sport.

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Presentation on theme: "Splash Screen. Chapter Menu Chapter Preview Section 1: The Nature of Sport Section 2:Theoretical Perspectives and Sport Section 3: Social Issues in Sport."— Presentation transcript:

1 Splash Screen

2 Chapter Menu Chapter Preview Section 1: The Nature of Sport Section 2:Theoretical Perspectives and Sport Section 3: Social Issues in Sport

3 Chapter Preview 1 Chapter Preview · Section 1 The Nature of Sport (pages 496–502) As a social institution, sport fulfills some important societal needs. One of these is helping individuals identify with other members of society. Sport subcultures have developed around both team and individual sports. For this reason, sport is a reflection of society.

4 Chapter Preview 2 Chapter Preview · Section 2 Theoretical Perspectives and Sport (pages 503–511) Functionalists see sport positively, as a means for socializing young people, promoting social integration, providing a release for tensions, and developing sound character. Conflict theorists believe that organized sports can be harmful to character development. Symbolic interactionists focus on the self-concepts and relationships developed through sport activities.

5 Chapter Preview 3 Chapter Preview · Section 3 Social Issues in Sport (pages 512–519) Sport contributes to upward mobility among collegiate athletes, but the opportunities are too few. Minorities still face discrimination in sport. Women in sport suffer from gender-based stereotypes. Although this situation is slowly improving, intercollegiate female athletes do not receive treatment equal to males.

6 Chapter Preview-End

7 Section 1-Preview As a social institution, sport fulfills some important societal needs. One of these is helping individuals identify with other members of society. Sport subcultures have developed around both team and individual sports. For this reason, sport is a reflection of society.

8 Section 1-Key Terms sport sport subculture

9 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1-Polling Question Which of the following are some benefits youve received from sports in your life? A.Societal needs B.Individuals identify with other members of society C.Reflection of society D.All of the above

10 Section 1 A Definition of Sport Sport is a set of competitive activities in which winners and losers are determined by physical performance within a set of established rules.Sport

11 A.A B.B Section 1 Do you agree or disagree with the definition of sport? A.Agree B.Disagree

12 Section 1 Sport as a Social Institution Sport teaches some of the basic values of society and promotes attachment to society.

13 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 Which of the following are some values that sport teaches? A.Basic values of society B.Promotes attachment to society C.Aids in socialization D.Self-identification

14 Section 1 Sport, Culture, and Society Sport reflects American societys emphasis on achievement. Males dominate the sport world, but progress is being made by females.

15 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 Do you feel that most sports are dominated by males? A.Very much so B.Somewhat C.Not very much D.Not at all

16 Section 1 Sport Subcultures A sport subculture is a group within a larger context of sport that has some of it own distinct roles, values, and norms.sport subculture Examples: –Hockey players –Surfboard riders versus surf lifesavers –Jockeys

17 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 What are some other sport subcultures? A.Hockey players B.Surfboard riders C.Surf lifesavers D.Jockeys

18 Section 1-End

19 Section 2-Preview Functionalists see sport positively, as a means for socializing young people, promoting social integration, providing a release for tensions, and a developing sound character. Conflict theorists believe that organized sports can be harmful to character development. Symbolic interactionists focus on the self-concepts and relationships developed through sport activities.

20 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section-Polling Question What do you think is the main function of sport? A.Character development B.Promote social identification C.Release for tension D.Teach basic norms

21 Section 2 Culture and Sport Sport is a major social activity through which culture is created and reinforced. Sociologists disagree about the social implications of sport. Sport Paradoxes

22 A.A B.B C.C Section 2 American sport embodies American values… Do you agree or disagree with this statement? A.Agree B.Disagree C.Not sure

23 Section 2 Functionalism Functionalists think sport is important because it helps society work more smoothly. Olympic Success

24 Section 2 Functionalism (cont.) The functions of sport: –To teach basic beliefs, norms, and values. –To promote a sense of social identification. –To offer a safe release of aggressive feelings generated by the frustrations, anxieties, and strains of modern life. –To encourage the development of character.

25 Section 2 Functionalism (cont.) Dysfunctions of sport: –The desire to win may cause extreme violence. –It may also cause cheating.

26 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 2 How do functionalists view the role of sport in society? A.Sport teaches basic beliefs, norms, and values. B.Sport promotes a sense of social identification. C.Sport offers a safe release of aggressive feelings generated by the frustrations, anxieties, and strains of modern life. D.Sport encourages the development of character.

27 Section 2 Conflict Theory To conflict theorists, sport is a social institution in which the most powerful oppress, manipulate, coerce, and exploit others. Although sport unites temporarily, inequality and social division still exist.

28 Section 2 Conflict Theory (cont.) They also believe that the better one is at a sport, the less sportsmanship he or she shows. Sports scandals seem to be everywhere.

29 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 2 What are some of the drugs that athletes take? A.Steroids B.Growth hormones C.Amphetamines D.All of the above

30 Section 2 Symbolic Interactionism This perspective concentrates on personal meaning, social relationships, and self- identity processes. The meanings of the symbols associated with sports affect the self-concepts, as well as the relationships, of those involved.

31 Section 2 Symbolic Interactionism (cont.) Limitations of each perspective: –Functionalistscritics of this perspective contend that many sports have become so closely tied to elite interests that they contribute more to private profit than to the general well-being of society.

32 Section 2 Symbolic Interactionism (cont.) –Conflict theoriststhey tend to overlook the positive contributions of sport to society. –Symbolic interactioniststhey fail to include the broader social and cultural context. Social Effects of Sport

33 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 2 How were social interaction and self- concepts affected by sports? A.Hustle B.Weaker C.Aggressive behavior D.Loss of self-esteem

34 Section 2-End

35 Section 3-Preview Sport contributes to upward mobility among collegiate athletes, but the opportunities are too few. Minorities still face discrimination in sport. Women in sport suffer from gender-based stereotypes. Intercollegiate female athletes do not receive treatment equal to the treatment received by males, although this situation is slowly improving.

36 Section 3-Key Terms stacking

37 A.A B.B C.C Section 3-Polling Question Do you agree that inequality exists in sports? A.Agree B.Disagree C.Not sure

38 Section 3 Sport and Social Mobility Participating in sport increases the likelihood of improving a persons place in the stratification structure. Some people argue that sport is a social class escalator for minorities. High School Athletes Chances of Advancing to the Pros

39 Section 3 Sport and Social Mobility (cont.) Others argue that the emphasis on sport is harmful because it diverts attention away from learning the academic and business- related skills necessary for success in mainstream society. Either way, no high school athlete should rely solely on sport as a ticket up the stratification structure.

40 A.A B.B C.C Section 3 Do you feel that athletes should be so revered? A.Very much so B.Somewhat C.Not very much

41 National Football League Positions, by Race Section 3 Sport and Racism In stacking, players are assigned to less central positions on the basis of race or ethnicity.stacking Most minorities are not assigned central positions, which has economic consequences for them. African Americans must perform better than whites to avoid pay discrimination.

42 Section 3 Sport and Racism (cont.) Minority former athletes profit much less than their white colleagues from personal appearances and commercial endorsements. They also lose out in sports-related careers when their playing days are over. There are few minorities represented in the power structure at the professional level. Who Are the Biggest Baseball Fans?

43 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 3 Do you feel that there are any solutions to this racism in sport? A.Yes B.No C.Not sure D.Sometimes

44 Section 3 Sexism in Sport Barriers for women: –Women who play sports have been stereotyped as masculine in the past. –They have also been told that sports would harm a womans health, especially her ability to bear children. –Sexism has denied women equal access to organized sports.

45 Section 3 Sexism in Sport (cont.) –Title IX helped. –Resistance to female participation at the local level still exists. –Women are still denied equal access to the power structure, and the number in those positions have ironically decreased due to Title IX. –Women at the professional level make significantly less than men.

46 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 3 What are some reasons that women have historically been discouraged from sports? A.More masculine B.Unfeminine C.Harm a womans health D.None of the above

47 Section 3-End

48 Figure 15.1

49 Figure 15.2

50 Figure 15.3 High School Athletes Chances of Advancing to the Pros Source: National Federation of State High School Associations, 1999–2000.

51 Figure 15.4 National Football League Positions, by Race Source: Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, 2004.

52 Figure 15.5 Percentage of College Womens Athletic Teams Coached by Women Source: R. Vivian Acosta and Linda Jean Carpenter, Women in Intercollegiate Sport. Brooklyn College, 2004.

53 Snapshot Source: Latitudes and Attitudes: An Atlas of American Tastes, Trends, Politics, and Passions. Boston: Little, Brown. Who Are the Biggest Baseball Fans?

54 World View Olympic Success Source: The World Almanac and Book of Facts, 2005.

55 Vocab1 sport a set of competitive activities in which winners and losers are determined by physical performance within a set of established rules

56 Vocab2 sport subculture a group with distinct roles, values, norms, and beliefs that is organized around a sport activity

57 Vocab3 stacking assignment of players to less central positions on the basis of race or ethnicity

58 Help Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Transparency button to access the transparencies that are relevant to this chapter. Click the Return button in a feature to return to the main presentation. Click the Sociology Online button to access online textbook features. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the chapter slide show. Click the Help button to access this screen. Links to Presentation Plus! features such as the Figures, Time Lines, Snapshot of America, World View and others are located at the bottom of relevant screens. To use this Presentation Plus! product:

59 End of Custom Shows


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