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Climb Strong An Intelligent Approach to Elevating Climbing Performance Steve Bechtel & Eric J. Hörst ElementalGym.com Training4Climbing.com Sponsors: Nicros.com.

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Presentation on theme: "Climb Strong An Intelligent Approach to Elevating Climbing Performance Steve Bechtel & Eric J. Hörst ElementalGym.com Training4Climbing.com Sponsors: Nicros.com."— Presentation transcript:

1 Climb Strong An Intelligent Approach to Elevating Climbing Performance Steve Bechtel & Eric J. Hörst ElementalGym.com Training4Climbing.com Sponsors: Nicros.com SterlingRope.com Sportiva.com

2 Objectives Present science-based fundamentals of training for climbing and elevating climbing performance. Encourage a targeted, results-based program for improving your performance and quality of experience. Describe select exercises, techniques, and tactics that are safe and uncommonly effective. Provide the framework for a practical, self-directed program that works (ie. different from the masses). Present smart training strategies for developing technique, mental skills, and physical capabilities.

3 Analysis of Strengths & Weaknesses Reasons for your current ability level: Years of experience & frequency of climbing Genetics (FOX 1996) Importance of climbing Knowledge of training principles and right practice Quality of training & coaching Level of self-awareness, mental control, & will power Willingness to fail Where you climb and how often you roadtrip Climbing/training partners

4 To elevate performance you need to: Make a decision that you must climb better! Increase importance of climbing better & embrace necessary changes Stretch boundaries (mental & physical)--be willing to fail! Refine technique & expand skills. Increase exposure to new terrain and areas. Leverage new partnerships Train smarter (harder?) The Rub

5 The Climbing Performance Pie Self-Assessment: Which piece is your strength? Which piece is most holding you back?

6 Technique Training Physical Fitness Training Mental Training Training Support Activities (injury prevention, nutrition, rest, recovery aids) Components of TFC

7 Climb Strong – Self-Assessment In taking this assessment, its best to read each question once and then immediately select an answer. Dont overanalyze the questions, and resist the common tendency to cheat up on your scores. Circle the answer that most accurately describes your current abilities and modus operandi. Each part consists of five questions worth a total of 25 points. Compare your scores in each part to identify the two or three areas most holding you backthese would be the lowest scoring parts of the assessment. Similarly, survey your answers question by question to identify specific weaknesses that should become the bulls-eye of your conditioning program.

8 Part 1 - Part 1 - Evaluate Your Climbing Experience 1. How long have you been climbing? 1less than six months, 2six to twelve months, 3one to four years, 4five to ten years, 5 more than ten years 2. On average, how many days per month to do you climb (both indoors and outdoors)? 1one day or less, 2two or three days, 3four to eight days, 4nine to twelve days, 5more than twelve days 3. How many different climbing areas and gyms have you visited in the last year? 1just one, 2two to four, 3five to nine, 4ten to fifteen, 5more than fifteen 4. How many of the following styles of climbing have you been active in over the last year: bouldering, gym climbing, sport climbing, follow trad climbs, leading trad climbs, big walls? 1one or two, 2three, 3four, 4five, 5six 5. How many of the following types of climbing have you engaged in over the last three months: slab climbing, face climbing, crack climbing, overhanging face climbing, pocket climbing, roofs? 1one or two, 2three, 3four, 4five, 5six

9 Part 2 - Part 2 - Evaluate Your Technical Skills 1. My footwork and overall technique deteriorate during the hardest part of a climb. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 2. Cracks, slabs, and roofs feel hard for the grade compared with a similarly graded face climb. 1almost always, 2often, 4about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 3. I have difficulty finding midroute rest positions and shakeouts. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 4. On the typical climb, I feel like much of my body weight is hanging on my arms. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 5. On overhanging routes and roofs, I have difficulty finding the optimal body position or keeping my feet from cutting loose. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never

10 Part 3 - Part 3 - Evaluate Your Mental Skills 1. I visualize myself successfully climbing the route before I leave the ground. 1seldom or never, 2occasionally, 3about half the time, 4often, 5almost always 2. I get anxious, tight, and hesitant as I climb into crux sequences. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 3. I miss hidden holds or blow a known sequence. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 4. I make excuses for why I might fail on a route before I even begin to climb. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 5. When lead climbing a safe route, I push myself to the complete limit and, if I fall, I fall trying. 1seldom or never, 2occasionally, 3about half the time, 4often, 5almost always

11 Part 4 - Part 4 - Evaluate Your Level of General Conditioning 1. How many pounds (body fat or excessively bulky muscles) do you estimate you are from your ideal climbing weight? 1more than twenty, 2ten to twenty, 3five to ten, 4just a few, 5zero 2. How far could you jog (modest pace steady running) without stopping? 1less than 0.5 mile, 20.5 - 1 mile, 31 - 2 miles, 43 - 5 miles, 5more than 5 miles 3. How many pull-ups can you do in a single set? 1women: one or none, men: less than five, 2women: two to four, men: five to nine, 3 women: five to nine, men: ten to nineteen, 4women: 10 to 20, men: 20 to 30, 5women: more than 20, men: more than 30 4. How many push-ups can you do in a single set? 1women: two or fewer, men: less than five, 2women: three to six, men: five to fifteen, 3 women: 7 to 15, men: 16 to 25, 4women: 16 to 25, men: 26 to 40, 5women: more than 25, men: more than 40 5. How many Abdominal Crunches can you do in a single set (knees bent)? 1less than ten, 2ten to twenty, 3twenty-one to forty-nine, 4fifty to seventy-five, 5more than 75

12 Part 5 - Part 5 - Evaluate Your Sport-Specific Conditioning 1. On overhanging routes with large holds, I pump out quickly and need to hang on the rope. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 2. I have difficulty hanging on small, necessary-to-use holds. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 3. I find it difficult to hold a lock-off with one arm when I let go to advance the other hand. 1almost always, 2often, 3about half the time, 4occasionally, 5seldom or never 4. Given a marginal midclimb rest, I can shake out and recover enough to complete the route. 1seldom or never, 2occasionally, 3about half the time, 4often, 5almost always 5. My maximum bouldering ability is: 1V0 or V1, 2V2 to V3, 3V4 to V5, 4V6 to V7, 5V8 or above

13 Part 6 - Part 6 - Evaluate Your Injury Risk 1. I perform a warm-up activity and some stretching before climbing or training. 1seldom or never, 2occasionally, 3about half the time, 4often, 5always 2. I climb hard on three or more consecutive days. 1every week, 2often, 3a couple times per month, 4once per month, 5seldom or never 3. When climbing, I experience elbow, shoulder, or finger pain. 1almost always, 2often, 3occasionally, 4infrequently, 5never 4. I engage in regular training of the antagonist push muscles. 1never, 2infrequently, 3a few times a month, 4once or twice a week, 5twice a week, religiously 5. I stop climbing or end a workout prematurely if I experience unusual joint or tendon pain. 1no, 3sometimes, 5yes

14 Part 7 - Part 7 - Evaluate Your Nutritional Habits 1. How often do you eat breakfast? 1seldom or never, 3about half the time, 5every day 2. How often do you eat fast food or fried foods? 1four or more days per week, 2two to three days per week, 3once a week, 4once or twice per month, 5less than once per month 3. On average, how soon after a workout or the end of your climbing day do you consume some carbohydrate and protein? 1more than three hours, 2two to three hours, 3one to two hours, 4thirty minutes to one hour, 5within thirty minutes 4. How many servings of fruits and vegetables do you consume per day? 1zero or one, 2two, 3three, 4four, 5five or more 5. How often do you plan out your meals ahead of time for the purpose of eating for performance and optimal recovery? 1seldom or never, 2once per week, 3two or three days per week, 4four to six days per week, 5every day

15 Part 8 - Part 8 - Evaluate Your Lifestyle and Discipline 1. How many days per week do you engage in a physical activity such as climbing, training, or another sport? 1one, 2two, 3three, 4four, 5five 2. On average, how many hours sleep do you get each night? 1less than five, 2five to six, 3six to seven, 4seven to eight, 5more than eight 3. How often do you pig out eating and drinking with little restraint? 13 or more days per week, 2twice per week, 3once per week, 4once or twice per month, 5never 4. Do you smoke? 1yes, daily, 3occasionally, 5no 5. When you set goals or begin a workout program, how often do you follow through to successful completion? 1seldom, 2occasionally, 3about half the time, 4often, 5almost always

16 Creating Your Assessment Profile Using figure below, fill in the bar graphs according to your score in each part of the package to plot the results to obtain a graphical profile. Take note of your three shortest bars. These low-scoring areas represent the greatest constraints on your climbing performance.


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