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Mathematics as a Second Language Mathematics as a Second Language Mathematics as a Second Language Developed by Herb I. Gross and Richard A. Medeiros ©

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Presentation on theme: "Mathematics as a Second Language Mathematics as a Second Language Mathematics as a Second Language Developed by Herb I. Gross and Richard A. Medeiros ©"— Presentation transcript:

1 Mathematics as a Second Language Mathematics as a Second Language Mathematics as a Second Language Developed by Herb I. Gross and Richard A. Medeiros © 2010 Herb I. Gross next Arithmetic Revisited

2 Whole Number Arithmetic Whole Number Arithmetic © 2010 Herb I. Gross next Addition Lesson 2 Part 1

3 Addition Through the Eyes of Place Value next The idea of numbers being viewed as adjectives not only provides a clear conceptual foundation for addition, but when combined with the ideas of place value yields a powerful computational technique. In fact, with only a knowledge of the ordinary 0 through 9 addition tables (i.e., addition of single digit numbers), our adjective/noun theme allows us to easily add any collection of whole numbers. © 2010 Herb I. Gross

4 next The main idea is that in our place value system, numerals in the same column modify the same noun. Hence, we just add the adjectives and keep the noun that specifies the column. © 2010 Herb I. Gross

5 next To illustrate the idea, lets carefully analyze how we add the two numbers 342 and 517. According to our knowledge of the place value representation of numbers, we set up the problem as follows… next © 2010 Herb I. Gross TensOnesHundreds

6 next In each column we use the addition table for single digits. We then solve the above problem by treating it as if it were three single digit addition problems. Namely… © 2010 Herb I. Gross adjectivenoun 3 hundreds 5 8 adjective noun 4 tens 1 ten 5 tens adjective noun 2 2 ones next

7 Of course, in everyday usage we do not have to write out the names of the nouns explicitly since the digits themselves hold the place of the nouns. Thus, instead of using the chart form below… © 2010 Herb I. Gross TensOnesHundreds …we usually perform the addition in the following succinct form… next

8 Since the nouns are not visible in the customary format for doing place value addition, it is important for a student to keep the nouns for each column in mind. © 2010 Herb I. Gross For example, in reading the leftmost column of the above solution out loud (or silently to oneself) a student should be saying… 3 hundred + 5 hundred = 8 hundred rather than just using the adjectives, as in = 8.

9 next In that way, one reads 859, the answer to , as… 8 hundreds, 5 tens, and 9 ones. 1 © 2010 Herb I. Gross In using place value to perform the above addition problem, you may have missed our subtle use of the associative and commutative properties of addition. note 1 Or in every-day terminology, we would read the solution as eight hundred fifty-nine. next

10 The commutative property of addition is a more formal way of saying that the sum of two numbers does not depend on the order in which the two numbers are written. © 2010 Herb I. Gross For example, = next Note Stated more generally, it says if a and b denote any numbers, then a + b = b + a. next

11 The associative property of addition is a more formal way of saying that the sum of three (or more) numbers does not depend on the how the numbers are grouped. © 2010 Herb I. Gross For example, (3 + 4) + 5 = 3 + (4 + 5). next Note note 2 Mathematicians use parenthesis in the same way that hyphens are used in grammatical expressions. That is, everything in parentheses is considered to be one number. Thus, (3 + 4) + 5 tells us that we first add the 3 and 4 and then add 5; while 3 + (4 + 5) tells us to add the sum of 4 and 5 to 3. next More generally, it says if a, b, and c denote any numbers, then (a + b) + c = a + (b + c) 2. next

12 Thus, is an abbreviation for writing… © 2010 Herb I. Gross (3 hundreds + 4 tens + 2 ones) + (5 hundreds + 1 ten + 7 ones) However, in using the vertical form of addition, (3 hundreds + 5 hundreds) + (4 tens + 1 ten) + (2 ones + 7 ones) we had actually used the rearrangement… next

13 So whether or not we know the formal terminology, the fact remains that the vertical format for doing addition of whole numbers is justified by the associative and commutative properties of addition. © 2010 Herb I. Gross

14 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross Classroom Application Using play money, give each student 3 hundred dollar bills, 4 ten dollar bills, and 2 one dollar bills. Then, give them… 5 more hundred dollar bills, 1 more ten dollar bill, and 7 more one dollar bills. Then, ask them how much money each of them has. next

15 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Classroom Application See how many of them simply combine the bills the way we do in vertical addition; that is… If they do this, they are painlessly using the commutative and associative properties of addition. next the 3 hundred dollar bills with the 5 hundred dollar bills; the 4 ten dollar bills with the 1 ten dollar bill; and the 2 one dollar bills with the 7 one dollar bills.

16 There is a difference between a job being difficult and just being tedious. © 2010 Herb I. Gross For example, we see from the illustration below that it is no more difficult to add, say, twelve-digit numbers than three-digit numbers. It is just more tedious (actually, more repetitious). next Note 2 3 4, 2 6 7, 5 8 0, , 3 1 2, 2 1 9, 6 0 2

17 next That is, instead of carrying out three simple single-digit addition procedures we have to carry out twelve. © 2010 Herb I. Gross Note 2 3 4, 2 6 7, 5 8 0, , 3 1 2, 2 1 9, 6 0 2

18 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross The problem is very easy, but requires some patience. next Note 2 3 4, 2 6 7, 5 8 0, , 3 1 2, 2 1 9, next,,, In general, no matter how many digits there are in the numbers that are being added, the process remains the same. Namely…

19 © 2010 Herb I. Gross next In terms of the adjective/noun theme, how would you correct a student who had made the following error, namely… to add 234 and 45, the student, believing that numbers should be aligned from left to right, writes… Practice Problem # and obtains the result… next

20 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Solution for Practice Problem #1 Place value addition is based on the fact that numbers in the same column must modify the same noun. So in adding 234 and 45, when the student wrote = 6; in place value notation he was saying that 2 hundreds + 4 tens = 6 hundreds (and also that 3 tens + 5 ones = 8 tens). next Notice that the 2 in 234 is modifying hundreds while the 4 in 45 is modifying tens.

21 © 2010 Herb I. Gross …the fact remains that X means ten no matter where it is placed. Notes on Practice Problem #1 next This error couldnt happen in Roman numerals because the nouns are visible. In other words, if you wrote the problem in the form… CCC XXX IIII XXXX IIIII

22 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross Notes on Practice Problem #1 next Even if the student is unaware of the adjective/noun theme, a little number sense should warn the students that the answer 684 cant possibly be correct. Namely, since = 334, and 45 is less than 100… must be less than 334. Clearly 684 is not less than 334.

23 Trading In or Carrying next Because the nouns are not visible in the place value representation of a number, certain ambiguities can occur that require resolution. © 2010 Herb I. Gross Suppose, for example, that you have 3 $10-bills and 5 $1-bills.

24 next Someone then gives you 2 more $10-bills and 9 more $1-bills. © 2010 Herb I. Gross It is clear that you now have a total of 5 $10-bills and 14 $1-bills.

25 next If you want to (but you certainly dont have to) you may exchange ten of your $1-bills for one $10-bill; thus leaving you with six $10-bills and 4 $1-bills. © 2010 Herb I. Gross After this exchange you have $64, just as before.

26 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross The same reasoning applies to the use of Roman numerals. Namely, since the numerals are visible we do not have to restrict ourselves to having no more than nine of any denomination. XXXXXXXXXXXI I I I I I II I C X For example, we can write the sum of, say, 67 and 54 as XXXXXX I I I I I I I XXXXX I I I I. and ten Xs for one C to obtain… If we wish to economize in our use of symbols, we exchange ten Is for an X ten next

27 © 2010 Herb I. Gross The point is that as long as the nouns are visible it is okay to have more than 9 of any denomination. However, if we wish, we may exchange 10 $1-bills for 1 $10-bill. That is, Line 1 and Line 2 in the chart below provide two different ways to represent the same amount of money. next $10-Bills$1-BillsLine 1514Line 264

28 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross However, if the nouns are now omitted, all we see is Line 1 in the form 514. $10-Bills$1-Bills Line How can we tell whether we are naming 5 hundreds, 1 ten, and 4 ones or 5 tens and 14 ones [that is, 5(14)]? This is a problem that many students encounter when first learning to add. next

29 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Namely, given an addition problem such as , students will often write the problem in vertical form and treat it as if it involved two separate single digit addition problems. For example… next note 3 If we wanted to use grouping symbols we could write 5(14) to indicate that there are 14 ones and 5 tens; but with numbers having a greater number of digits this would quickly become very cumbersome. next ( )

30 © 2010 Herb I. Gross To avoid such ambiguities as illustrated above in which 5 tens and 14 ones can be confused with 5 hundreds, 1 ten and 4 ones, we adopt the following convention (or agreement) for writing a number in place value. We never use more than one digit per place value column. next

31 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross By keeping this agreement in mind, we avoid the type of confusion that results in writing 514 dollars when 64 dollars is meant. The notion of trading in ten 1s for one 10 is precisely the logic behind the concept usually referred to, in the traditional mathematics curriculum, as carrying and in the modern mathematics curriculum, as regrouping. next

32 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Thus, for example, in computing the sum… Trading-in/Carrying/Regrouping 4 we often start by saying something like 5 plus 9 equals 14. Put down the 4 and carry the By placing the 1 over the 3 and noting that 3 is in the tens place, what we have said is 5 ones + 9 ones = 14 ones = 1 ten + 4 ones. next

33 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Continuing with this concept, one can lead a student in a step-by-step fashion through the process of carrying by initially allowing the denominations to be visible. For example, to compute the sum, 5, ,959, we would first rewrite the problem as… next thousands hundreds tens ones next

34 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Notice that at this stage of the process there is no need to exchange ten of any denomination for one of the next denomination (unless one feels like doing it) because the denominations are visible. next A more tangible way to see this is in terms of our play money model.

35 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Namely, suppose you have play money in the classroom, and you first hand the student five $1,000-bills, two $100- bills, eight $10-bills, and six $1-bills. next Then you hand the student an additional two $1,000-bills, nine $100-bills, five $10-bills and nine $1-bills. Altogether, the student sees that he/she has seven $1,000 bills, eleven $100- bills, thirteen $10-bills and fifteen $1-bills.

36 © 2010 Herb I. Gross Including all denominations, the student now has a total of 46 bills, and may wish to have a smaller stack but yet have the same amount of money. next Thus, the student can systematically proceed to exchange currency by converting ten of one denomination into one of the next denomination, beginning with the lowest denomination and proceeding step-by-step to the higher denominations.

37 © 2010 Herb I. Gross The following chart shows each step of the regrouping process. next $1,000 bills $100 bills$10 bills$1 bills Step Step Step next 12 82

38 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross In Step 1, the student has traded in ten $1-bills for one $10-dollar bill; in Step 2, he/she has traded in ten $10-bills for one $100-bill, and in Step 3, he/she has traded in ten $100-bills for one $1,000-bill. Step Step Step $1,000 bills$100 bills$10 bills$1 bills

39 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross The student knows from this chart that at each step of the process the value of the currency has not changed, but at the end of this process, the total number of bills has been reduced from 46 to 19, and the following general principle has become clear… next The process of exchanging ten of one denomination for one of the next higher denomination ends when the number remaining in each denomination is less than ten.

40 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross In terms of currency, what we are saying is that regardless of how much money we want to have in our wallet, we never have to have more than nine bills of any denomination. next Once students see the above sequence of steps in a logical and easy to understand fashion, it is relatively simple to turn from the concrete illustration using currency to the abstract concept of place value.

41 © 2010 Herb I. Gross They will then understand from a logical point of view that since the denominations are no longer visible, we have to write the sum in the form of Step 3 (that is, as 8,245) unless we want to run the risk of having our answer misinterpreted. next In summary, the visible transition from Step 1 through Step 3 should help the student understand the concept of carrying.

42 next A Classroom Note © 2010 Herb I. Gross It might be difficult for some students to work with more than a single digit at a time. Hence rather than write 14 as… next tens ones 14 it might be easier for them if we wrote it as… tens ones 1 4

43 © 2010 Herb I. Gross In this way, an intermediate way for solving the above problem would be… next A Classroom Note (15 ones) (13 tens) (11 hundreds) (7 thousands) 8 (8,245 ones) 245, next

44 Exploring the Counting on Your Fingers Myth next As teachers, we often tend to discourage students from counting on their fingers. We often say such things as, What would you do if you didnt have enough fingers? © 2010 Herb I. Gross The point is that in place value we always have enough fingers!

45 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross Consider, for example, the following addition problem… next 5, , , , and notice that this result could be obtained even if we had forgotten the simple addition tables, provided that we understood place value and knew how to count.

46 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross Remembering that numbers in the same column modify the same noun and using the associative property of addition 4, next we could start with the 6 in the ones place and on our fingers add on nine more to obtain 15. Then starting with 15 we could count three more to get 18; after which we would exchange ten 1s for one 10 by saying bring down the 8 and carry the 1. We may then continue in this way, column by column, until the final sum is obtained. note 4 Up to now we've talked about the sum of two numbers. However, no matter how many numbers we're adding, we never add more than two numbers at a time. For example, to form the sum , we can first add 2 and 3 to obtain 5, and then add 5 and 4 to obtain 9. We would obtain the same result if we had first added 3 and 4 to obtain 7, and then added 7 and 2 to obtain 9. next

47 © 2010 Herb I. Gross More explicitly… next 5, , , ( ) ones = 18 ones = 1 ten 8 ones1 8 ( ) tens = 20 tens = 2 hundreds2 0 ( ) hundreds = 17 hundreds = 1 thousand 7 hundreds 1 7 ( ) thousands = 8 thousands next

48 © 2010 Herb I. Gross However, the point we wanted to illustrate in the above example is that even though there is a tendency to tell youngsters that grown ups dont count on their fingers, the fact remains that with a proper understanding of place value and knowing only how to count on our fingers we can solve any whole number addition problem. next In particular at any stage of the addition process we are always adding two numbers, at least one of which is a single digit.

49 © 2010 Herb I. Gross By using our adjective/noun theme, we can paraphrase a problem like into a more user friendly addition problem. next Namely, suppose John has 35 marbles and Bill has 29 marbles. An Application of Number Sense

50 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross next John 35 marbles Bill 29 marbles Notice that the above addition would have been simpler if Bill had 30 marbles instead of 29. So lets suppose John gives one of his marbles to Bill. John 34 marbles Bill 30 marbles 64 marbles By sight, = 64. However, since the total number of marbles hasnt changed, is also marbles

51 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross More generally, the sum of two numbers remains the same if we subtract an amount from one of the numbers and add it to the other. next So, for example, to find the sum of 998 and 277, we notice that = 1,000. Hence, we add 2 to 998 and subtract 2 from – 2 1, next

52 © 2010 Herb I. Gross next In this way we obtain the equivalent addition problem 1, from which we quickly see that this sum is 1,275. Therefore, we also know that = 1, – 2 1, , 2 7 5

53 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross Teaching students to use the add and subtract theme gives them a relatively painless way to practice whole number addition. For example, they can find the sum of 497 and 389 by rewriting the sum in the equivalent form next They rather easily see that the sum of 500 and 386 is 886; and they can then practice traditional addition by adding 497 and 389 to verify that the obtain the same sum.

54 next © 2010 Herb I. Gross One goal of critical thinking is to reduce complicated problems to a sequence of equivalent but simpler ones. next Here we have a very nice example of the genius that goes into making things simple!


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