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Surface Water Quantity Model Development Connely Baldwin USU.

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Presentation on theme: "Surface Water Quantity Model Development Connely Baldwin USU."— Presentation transcript:

1 Surface Water Quantity Model Development Connely Baldwin USU

2 Overview Do the first checkpoint –Summarize management options relating to water quantity. –Identify higher priority/more implementable management options –Assign processes, parameters, and geographic locations to each management option to be incorporated in the surface water quantity model. Describe TOPNET in more detail Present plan for early prototype

3 Phase III Develop the model…and NOW – compress 12 months of work into 4 Components: 1.Rainfall-runoff transformation 2.Evapotranspiration calculation 3.Water use calculation 4.Ecological flow and water rights accounting 5.Diversion/storage accounting 6.Integration with ground water model

4 Phase III contd Integration of these parts: Note: The number in parentheses is the item number from the previous slide

5 Phase III Milestones/ Checkpoints 1.Management option check point 2.Generic rainfall-runoff transformation model design 3.Determining which processes are needed in which drainages (snow melt, glacier dynamics, drainage modifications, etc.) 4.Design of the required processes 5.Evapotranspiration component design 6.Water use component design 7.Ecological flow and water rights accounting 8.Diversion/storage accounting 9.Integration of ground water model components 10.Land-use and land cover modifier (user- interface component) 11.Diversion/inter-basin transfer locator (user- interface component) 12.Storage locator, including ASR, on-stream reservoir, and off-stream reservoir (user- interface component) To facilitate communication with the water quantity Technical Team, several milestones are identified that represent significant points at which agreement on the approach will be obtained through regular conference calls.

6 Management Options Check Point and Prioritization B - [Trans-drainage] diversions, storage (any type) A- Water use changes (add new uses, change SW to GW) A - Land use changes (development, irrigation eff.) A - Water use rate changes [per unit area based on land use] A - GW augmentation of surface water flows in low- flow period C - Water rights enforcement A - Examine sensitivity of system to exempt well water use C - Tile Drains

7 Generic Rainfall-runoff Transformation Model Design TOPMODEL (Beven and Kirkby, 1979 and later) applied to each upland drainage. Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration. Vegetation interception component. Soil zone –Adjust ET soil moisture availability in root zone –Infiltration excess runoff generation capabiity –Unsaturated zone storage and drainage Parameters averaged over each drainage. Kinematic wave routing of stream flow through channel network. Various changes to stream flow (use, rights limitations, diversions to other drainages)

8 Hydraulic conductivity decreasing with depth Saturated lateral flow driven by topographic gradient Potential ET demand Penman-Monteith Pre-built subroutine Precipitation Derived from existing daily stations and PRISM surface Snow, glacier (Utah Energy Balance) Mass and Energy Balance Model Throughfall Saturation Excess Runoff Infiltration Excess Runoff Baseflow Recharge Z ZrZr Saturated Soil Store distribution of wetness index Interception Store Soil Store SR(m) =Soil Zone water content Canopy Capacity CC (m) =x 1 weighted in subbasins Canopy Storage CV (m) =S Parameters Z r =depth from root zone info, 1,, 2, K 0, f, Implicit Param. Variables SOILC r = z r *( ), If z < z r SR enhanced locally to TOPNET – Upland Drainages Wind Disaggregated from Recent data

9 Throughfall Saturation Excess Runoff Infiltration Excess Runoff Baseflow Recharge Z ZrZr Interception Store Soil Store SR(m) =Soil Zone water content Canopy Capacity CC (m) =x 1 weighted in subbasins Canopy Storage CV (m) =S Parameters Z r =depth from root zone info, 1,, 2, K 0, f, Implicit Param. Variables SOILC r = z r *( ), If z < z r SR enhanced locally to TOPNET – Lowland Drainages Lumped Parameter GW Store Model 7 drainages – Model parameters from available data Other – extrapolated from available data MODFLOW 3 drainages – more work to link to TOPNET Snow, glacier (Utah Energy Balance) Mass and Energy Balance Model Potential ET demand Penman-Monteith Pre-built subroutine Precipitation, Temperature Derived from daily data and PRISM surface Wind Disaggregated from Recent data Hydraulic conductivity decreasing with depth

10 Evapotranspiration Pre-built Penman-Monteith subroutine to calculate daily reference ET (see Handbook of Hydrology, 2d edition (1996), Ch 4 for gory details) Adjusted to actual ET using daily Kc values based on land cover (lookup tables)

11 Water Use Based on WRIA 1 Water Accounting Model (WWAM) as possible (use their rates as defaults, codify the setup as tables in database) –Differences: Reference ET calculated daily, use effective precipitation to estimate agricultural water use –Possible extensions: Account for PUD water use by source location (Cherry Point) – generalized or aggregated as needed Allow estimates of exempt well water use (sensitivity) Changes from surface water to ground water withdrawal

12 Ecological Flow and Water Rights Accounting Priority-based enforcement Starting point for data: WRIA 1 GIS layer/Water rights and applications database Grouping of water rights by drainage (report reliability at drainage level) Buying senior water rights (devote to ecological flow) IRPP flows

13 Diversion/Storage Accounting Diversions: Simple… take water from one drainage, put it in another Storage: Almost as simple … take water from one drainage, hold it for a while, put it back.

14 Integration with Ground Water Model Transient Lumped Parameter Model – replaces the Topmodel saturated zone component – relatively simple MODFLOW – recharge disaggregation (develop a general procedure, use GIS layers) Water use issues – agricultural and rural residential water use returns to ground water add to soil store, municipal use returns to a surface water body (to be quantified). Visualization – differentiate between ground water modeling areas and extrapolated areas.


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