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4.1 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam 70-290 Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data.

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Presentation on theme: "4.1 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam 70-290 Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data."— Presentation transcript:

1 4.1 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Storage types used by Windows Server 2003 Basic storage (divides a hard disk into partitions) Dynamic storage (divides a hard disk into volumes) Basic disk supports the following types of partitions Primary partition – a physical unit of storage created on a basic disk Extended partitions – created from free space that has not yet been partitioned (Skill 1) Introducing Storage Types

2 4.2 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Dynamic disks support the following types of volumes Simple volume – consists of disk space from a single hard disk, an entire disk, or multiple regions on the same disk that are linked together Spanned volume – consists of disk space from multiple disks. Striped volume (RAID-0) – combines areas of free disk space from two or more hard disks Mirrored volume (RAID-1) – is created using the free disk space on two physical hard disks RAID-5 volume – is a fault-tolerant, striped, dynamic volume that combines free disk space from 3 to 32 physical hard disks Introducing Storage Types (2) (Skill 1)

3 4.3 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-1 Types of partitions on a basic disk (Skill 1)

4 4.4 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-2 How data is written to dynamic volumes (Skill 1)

5 4.5 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-3 Limitations of dynamic disks (Skill 1)

6 4.6 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-4 Available disk configuration (Skill 2) Provides information about each physical disk and the partitions or volumes on each disk Provides information about the type of disk, the file system used to format the disk, the disk capacity, and the status of the disk

7 4.7 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-5 Assigning the drive letter (Skill 2)

8 4.8 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-6 Formatting the partition and labeling the volume (Skill 2)

9 4.9 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-7 Properties dialog box for the primary partition (Skill 2)

10 4.10 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-8 Changing the drive letter of a primary partition (Skill 2)

11 4.11 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-9 The Change Drive Letter or Path dialog box (Skill 2)

12 4.12 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-13 A logical drive on an extended partition (Skill 3) A logical drive has been created on Disk 1

13 4.13 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Upgrading a Disk from Basic to Dynamic By default, the hard disk on a Windows Server 2003 computer is initialized with basic storage When you upgrade a basic disk, the existing partitions are converted into simple volumes Use the Disk Management snap-in to upgrade a basic disk to a dynamic disk (Skill 4)

14 4.14 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-14 The Convert to Dynamic Disk dialog box Figure 4-15 The Disks to Convert dialog box (Skill 4)

15 4.15 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-16 The Disk Management message box Figure 4-17 The Convert Disk to Dynamic warning message Figure 4-18 The Confirm message box (Skill 4) You will have to reboot if you are converting a disk that includes the boot volume, system volume or a volume that includes the paging file

16 4.16 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Creating a Simple Volume Upgrading a basic disk to a dynamic disk Any existing partitions are converted to volumes Any free space that is left on the drive can be used to create additional volumes Simple volume Can be part of a disk or an entire disk Can be created only on a single dynamic disk (Skill 5)

17 4.17 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-19 Creating a simple volume (Skill 5)

18 4.18 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-20 Setting the size for the simple volume (Skill 5)

19 4.19 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-21 Newly created simple volume (Skill 5) Note that if you created the primary partition and the logical drive on the extended partition on the same disk, they were converted to simple volumes when the disk was upgraded to dynamic

20 4.20 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Introducing Spanned, Striped and Mirrored Volumes Spanned volumes Creating a spanned volume Combines the unallocated space on multiple disks into one logical volume A spanned volume can organize disk space on up to a maximum of 32 disks Spanned disks allow you to combine the space used by multiple, smaller volumes, on multiple disks, into one spanned volume represented by a single drive letter (Skill 6)

21 4.21 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-22 Creating a spanned volume (Skill 6)

22 4.22 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-23 Selecting the disks to create a spanned volume (Skill 6)

23 4.23 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-25 Newly created spanned volume (Skill 6) Spanned volume created using 300 MB of disk space from two hard disks on your machine

24 4.24 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Striped volumes As with spanned volumes, you can combine disk space from a maximum of 32 disks to create a striped volume On a striped volume, data is divided in blocks of 64 KB across each segment of the volume Data is simultaneously written across all of the disks so that it is added to the disks at the same rate Introducing Spanned, Striped and Mirrored Volumes (2) (Skill 6)

25 4.25 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-26 Assigning a drive letter to the striped volume (Skill 6)

26 4.26 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-27 Newly created striped volume (Skill 6)

27 4.27 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Mirrored volumes A mirrored volume provides fault tolerance because you create two drives that are duplicates of each other Mirrored volumes are inefficient in some respects because fifty percent of the available disk space is consumed by fault tolerance Introducing Spanned, Striped and Mirrored Volumes (3) (Skill 6)

28 4.28 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-28 Selecting the disks for a mirrored volume (Skill 6)

29 4.29 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-30 Newly created mirrored volume (Skill 6) Mirrored volume created by combining free space from two hard disks

30 4.30 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-31 Setting the size for a RAID-5 volume (Skill 7) 300 MB of space will be used from each disk for a total of 600 MB of usable storage space 1/3 (300 MB) will be lost to parity data

31 4.31 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-33 Newly created RAID-5 volume (Skill 7) A RAID-5 volume created using disk space from three hard disks

32 4.32 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Defragmenting Volumes and Partitions The Disk Defragmenter rearranges files and unused space, moving the segments of each file and folder to one location so that they occupy a single, contiguous space on the hard disk Enhancements In Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, file system defragmenter support is no longer dependent on compressed file routines and the Cache Manager Limitations on defragmenting volumes with cluster sizes larger than 4 KB and on moving single NTFS file clusters have been remedied (Skill 8)

33 4.33 © 2004 Pearson Education, Inc. Exam Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 Environment Lesson 4: Organizing a Disk for Data Storage Figure 4-34 The Disk Defragmenter utility in the Computer Management console (Skill 8)


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