Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Asset Management Systems Pavement Management. 2 What is Transportation Asset Management? An ongoing process of maintaining, upgrading, and operating physical.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Asset Management Systems Pavement Management. 2 What is Transportation Asset Management? An ongoing process of maintaining, upgrading, and operating physical."— Presentation transcript:

1 Asset Management Systems Pavement Management

2 2 What is Transportation Asset Management? An ongoing process of maintaining, upgrading, and operating physical assets cost effectively, based on a continuous physical inventory and condition assessment Source: Act 499 of the Public Acts of 2002.

3 3 New Roof $10,000 New Roof $10,000 Replace Windows $5,000 Replace Windows $5,000 Siding $8,000 Siding $8,000 New Carpet $4,000 New Carpet $4,000 New Furnace $8,000 New Furnace $8,000 Landscaping $3,000 Landscaping $3,000

4 4 Asset management for a car New Car Regular oil changes, Flush radiator Wash/wax regularly Repair paint chips Change belts, Change transmission fluid

5 5 Asset management for a car Aging Car Charge AC Repaint Engine overhaul New tires

6 6 Asset management for a car Old Car Only critical maintenance Only critical repair Not worried about auxiliary features that fail Keep it running until it can be replaced - minimize cost

7 7 Not worried about scratches on this one!

8 8 Innovative Repair Strategies

9 Nuts and Bolts of Asset Management Pavement Management

10 10 Managing Physical Assets Features of an Asset Management System 1. Inventory 2. Condition Measure 3. Prediction of Future Condition 4. Tools / Metrics for Managing Network

11 You cant manage what you dont know you own 11 Inventory – What do I own?

12 Need data on any feature that influences: Cost to Replace or Maintain Maintenance or Rehab Treatment Options Influences Management Decisions Service Life 12 Inventory – What do I own?

13 13 Inventory – Basics Pavement Type Asphalt Concrete Sealcoat Composite How many lane miles of each? How wide are the lanes? Where are they? – Map

14 14 Inventory – Others What types of roads are they? – functional class Maintenance history Funding qualification Curb types Shoulder type and width Presence of other utilities and general condition Confining structures (overpass)

15 15 Condition– What Shape is it In?

16 16 Condition – Picking A System Sustainable Can I afford to collect the data? Can my staff collect that data or do I have to hire it out? Can I collect enough data to give me suitable information? Be descriptive about the asset Can I make decisions about the asset from the rating? Can it be understood by staff? Can I explain it to public and elected officials? Is the level of data appropriate?

17 17 Condition Rating – Types of Systems Ordered State Ratings Set of criteria which describe a set of discrete, ordered states. Professional observer judges state and assigns rating. Usually most cost effective system Most subject to variability by rater PASER – Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating Maintenance State Good – Fair – Poor MDOT Sufficiency Rating System

18 18 Condition Rating – Types of Systems Index System Set of criteria which relates physical measurements of distress extent and observer opinion of severity to a numeric rating. Criteria numerically relate distresses to each other. Usually requires sampling and reliance on statistics to apply over large network Index levels may not be discrete Record of distress propagation PCI – Pavement Condition Index (Micropaver) MDOT Distress Index

19 19 Index Rating

20 20 Condition Rating – Types of Systems Measurements of physical aspects Rutting Roughness Skid resistance FWD data (pavement rigidity) Crack frequency

21 21 Why Rate Roads? Anticipate treatment windows – When to do things Condition measure – What things to do Measure of adequacy– How did that treatment/design work? Measure of network change - Are things getting better or worse?

22 22 Prediction – What Shape WILL it be in?

23 23 Predicting the Future Condition Past experience / Professional opinion Rules of thumb Traffic Volume Model historical rating data Forward Looking Models

24 24 Predicting the Future Rules of thumb New asphalt pavement last 14 years 5 years after rehab or 2 years after overlay need a crack seal 8 years after resurfacing need seal coat Overlays last 6 years Concerns No calibration Assumptions are sensitive to error

25 25 Predicting the Future Traffic Volume Design ESALS Use traffic counts as measure of remaining service life Concerns Assumes construction reflects design Hard to calibrate to meaningful intervals

26 26 Modeling Historical Data

27 27 Modeling Historical Data Constrained polynomial Fit progressively higher order polynomials Constrain so fit line does not have positive slope Curve Form Fitting Makes assumptions about general form Fits curve family to data points

28 Early Estimation - Prescriptive Years Since Construction PASER RATING

29 Modeling Curve Form Fitting Years Since Construction PASER RATING

30 Polynomial Fitting Years Since Construction PASER RATING

31 31 Network Management Tools – Getting Asset Where You Want It To Be

32 32 Network Level Vs. Project Level Project: Moving pieces Network: Winning game

33 33 Service Cycle How big is the network? How much of the network do I do work on? How long will it take to touch the entire network? Is this longer than the expected life of my pavement? EXAMPLE 500 lane mile road network Do 10 lane miles of work each year Takes 500/10 = 50 years to touch all of the network Asphalt pavement only last 15 years

34 34 Historical Distribution

35 35 Winning or Loosing?

36 36 NCPP Network Condition Health # Of Lane Miles in your network Same number of RSL lost each year How it works... Programmed Activity (reconstruction, chip seal, etc.) Fix Cost (per lane mile) Extended Service Life (ESL) # of Lane Miles Fixed Result Lane Mile/ Years per Fix Total for Entire Network

37 37 NCPP Process COSTS Reconstruction _______ Lane Miles X $300,000 = $______________ Overlay _______ Lane Miles X $80,000 = $______________ Sealcoat _______ Lane Miles X $20,000 = $______________ Crack seal _______ Lane Miles X $4,000 = $______________ TOTAL _________________

38 38 NCPP Process COSTS Reconstruction _______ Lane Miles X $300,000 = $______________ Overlay 2 Lane Miles X $80,000 = $ 160,000 Sealcoat _______ Lane Miles X $20,000 = $______________ Crack seal _______ Lane Miles X $4,000 = $______________ TOTAL _________________

39 39 NCPP Process Lane Mile-Years Improvement Reconstruction _______ Lane Miles X 15 Years = _________________ Overlay _______ Lane Miles X 8 Years = _________________ Sealcoat _______ Lane Miles X 4 years = _________________ Crack seal _______ Lane Miles X 1 year = _________________ TOTAL _________________

40 40 NCPP Process Lane Mile-Years Improvement Reconstruction _______ Lane Miles X 15 Years = _________________ Overlay 2 Lane Miles X 8 Years = 16 Sealcoat _______ Lane Miles X 4 years = _________________ Crack seal _______ Lane Miles X 1 year = _________________ TOTAL _________________

41 41 NCPP Network Condition Health MI Example625 Lane Mile Network Programmed Activity Fix Cost per Lane Mile ESL Years # of Lane Miles of Fix Lane Mile Years Total Cost Reconstruction $530, $2,120,000 Rehabilitation $170, $1,020,000 Mill & Overlay $68, $340,000 Non Struc. OvL $32, $224,000 Crack Seal $4, $28, $3,732,800

42 42 Network Level Strategy Analysis Using Computer Models

43 Is It A Management System? GIS 43

44 Is It A Management System? 44 GASB 34 Accounting method Requires road assets to be reported as cash value Assets must be devalued for age or quality Results must be reported to federal government

45 Systems Management Adoption In order for a system to be valued and have longevity it must do the following: o Be part of the agencies business practice, AND o Work to make a necessary business practice easier, AND o The time spent supporting the system must be less that the value it provides. 45

46 Roadsoft Strategy Evaluation Segments with similar RSL summed by mileage Analysis by singular pavement type Network level (segment history lost) RSLMiles

47 Deterioration Each Year of simulation subtracts one year of RSL Keeps negative RSL categories discrete RSL

48 Treatment User specified treatments Cost Trigger range Reset range Treatments only applied to Trigger range No candidates, no treatment RSL { 20 MI Reconstruct


Download ppt "Asset Management Systems Pavement Management. 2 What is Transportation Asset Management? An ongoing process of maintaining, upgrading, and operating physical."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google