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Principles of Ecology Bio C2. Principles of Ecology I.Organisms and their Environment A.Sharing the world 1. Studying Nature B.What is ecology? 1. Definition.

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Presentation on theme: "Principles of Ecology Bio C2. Principles of Ecology I.Organisms and their Environment A.Sharing the world 1. Studying Nature B.What is ecology? 1. Definition."— Presentation transcript:

1 Principles of Ecology Bio C2

2 Principles of Ecology I.Organisms and their Environment A.Sharing the world 1. Studying Nature B.What is ecology? 1. Definition of ecology 2. Ecological research C.The Biosphere

3 Principles of Ecology C.The Biosphere 1. Structure of the biosphere 2. The non-living environment 3. Living environment II. Levels of Organization

4 Principles of Ecology II.Levels of Organization A. Population- group of same species interbreeding & living together in same place & time

5 Principles of Ecology B. Communities- interacting populations in a certain area at the same time.

6 Principles of Ecology C. Ecosystems- interacting populations and the communities abiotic factors.

7 Principles of Ecology C.Ecosystems Types 1. Terrestrial 2. Aquatic a. Fresh b. saltwater 3. Other Sites

8 Principles of Ecology An egret can be a predator, prey, and a mover of fish eggs and seeds. An egret can be a predator, prey, and a mover of fish eggs and seeds. III.Organisms in Ecosystems habitat- place where organism lives A. Niche- strategies & adaptations species use to meet its needs. (Jobs they do)

9 Principles of Ecology IV.Survival Relationships A. Predator- Prey* B. Mutualism* C. Commensalism D. Parasitism The caterpillars have nectar organs which ants drink from, & acacia tolerates feeding caterpillars. The ants appear to provide protection for both plant & caterpillar.

10 Principles of Ecology IV.Survival Relationships C. Commensalism relationship between two species where one derives benefit & the other is unaffected D. Parasitism- tomato hornworm with pupating braconid wasps.

11 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES:

12 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food

13 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food

14 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Habitat

15 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Habitat Niche

16 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Habitat Niche Resource

17 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Habitat Niche Resource Organism

18 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Habitat Niche Resource Organism Population

19 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Habitat Niche Resource Organism Population Community

20 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Habitat Niche Resource Organism Population Community NOT one but ALL these things interacting together make up an ECOSYSTEM

21 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Includes living & nonliving things organized within BIOMES into the BIOSPHERE. Habitat Niche Resource Organism Population Community NOT one but ALL these things interacting together make up an ECOSYSTEM

22 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Includes living & nonliving things organized within BIOMES into the BIOSPHERE. Organism Population Community Ecosystem Habitat Niche Resource Organism Population Community NOT one but ALL these things interacting together make up an ECOSYSTEM

23 Ecosystem Definition: Characteristics: Example: Mold growing in ceiling tiles of a building causing allergies Non-Examples: Ecosystem Interactions among populations in a community (biotic) within the communitys physical surroundings (abiotic factors) TYPES: Terrestrial: forest, field meadow, yard, rotting log Aquatic: Freshwater or Marine Other: Human Body, Buildings, or Food Includes living & nonliving things organized within BIOMES into the BIOSPHERE. Organism Population Community Ecosystem Habitat Niche Resource Organism Population Community NOT one but ALL these things interacting together make up an ECOSYSTEM

24 2.2 Nutrition & Energy Flow I.How Organisms get Energy A. Producers- Autotrophs B. Consumers- Heterotrophs 1.Herbivores 2. Carnivores 3. Scavengers 4. Omnivores 5. Decomposers

25 2.2 Nutrition & Energy Flow I.How Organisms get Energy A. Producers- Autotrophs B. Consumers- Heterotrophs 1.Herbivores- eat plants 2. Carnivores- eat animals 3. Scavengers- eat carrion (dead) 4. Omnivores- eat both plant & animal 5. Decomposers- breakdown compounds into molecules

26 Pyramid of Energy

27 Nutrition & Energy Flow II.Flow of Matter & Energy in Ecosystems A. Food Chains B. Food Webs C. Ecological pyramids

28 Food Chains Simple model scientists use to show how food & energy move Simple model scientists use to show how food & energy move through an ecosystem.

29 Nutrition & Energy Flow III. Cycles in Nature A. Water Cycle B. C Cycle C. N Cycle D. Phosphorus Cycle

30 Phosphorus Cycle


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