Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Bus Operations and Interfacing. Overview Focus on the microprocessor bus oBus operations in general oDevice addressing and decoding oTiming diagrams and.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Bus Operations and Interfacing. Overview Focus on the microprocessor bus oBus operations in general oDevice addressing and decoding oTiming diagrams and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bus Operations and Interfacing

2 Overview Focus on the microprocessor bus oBus operations in general oDevice addressing and decoding oTiming diagrams and timing requirements oExternal devices: PRU, memory, other support chips Readings: oText: Chap 5, Chap 6 (Sec 2); Chap 7, Sec 1-5 oHC11: Sec 2.6 oE9: Appendix A

3 BUS Operations This section focuses on the ability to interface external devices to the microprocessor Interfacing requires oHardware interface -- electrical and mechanical considerations of the interface oSoftware interface -- programming necessary to permit the external device and the processor exchange information The "bus" oThe set of signal lines used to connect the processor and the peripheral devices using read/write operations Cont..

4 BUS Operations oCan be a simple extension of the processor pins or can consist of modifications of the pins oBus signals can be divided into 3 categories Address Data Control Figure 5.1 Processor bus organization Cont..

5 BUS Operations Many microcontrollers use a multiplexed address and data bus oThe data bus and (part of) the address bus use the same physical lines oAddress and data signals cannot appear on the bus at the same time oRequires extra logic to demultiplex Usually need to latch the address bits (Temporarily put them in a register) oWhy do we use a multiplexed bus? Cont..

6 BUS Operations General bus operation: oProcessor places desired peripheral's address onto address bus oProcessor (or peripheral) places data onto data bus for a write (read) operation oPeripheral (processor) gates the data into its internal registers to complete the operation oOperation is directed by the various control lines that are included in the bus Clock signals Address strobe / latch Device enable signals Cont..

7 BUS Operations Data direction signals -- read vs. write Type of reference -- standard or memory mapped I/O -- IO/M* Data ready The bus is not a static connection mechanism oPeripheral devices must be enabled (given access to write to the bus) only when they are participating in a data transfer oOnly 1 device can be driving the bus at any given time -- otherwise bus contention results o3-state (= tristate) devices are commonly used Normal logic levels if enabled High-impedance state if disabled Cont..

8 BUS Operations Cont.. oFigure 5.3 Three-State Logic

9 BUS Operations Enable signals oUsually an active-low signal oReferred to as E* Sometimes S* or CS* oDevice must be enabled before you can write to it or read from it oE* is usually derived from address lines oOther signals R/W* Read and Write may be separate signals G* Synchronizes data transfer Sometimes CLK or E Other address lines Cont..

10 BUS Operations Address decoding oTo communicate with a particular peripheral device, the processor places the device's address on the address bus oAll peripherals must examine the address and decide if they are being referenced... oAddress decoding: Usually use digital logic to generate the CS* signal Full (exhaustive) decoding oEach peripheral is assigned to a unique address oAll address bits must be used to define the referenced location oTypically used for memory devices Cont..

11 BUS Operations Partial decoding oNot all address bits are used in the decoding process oPeripheral can respond to more than 1 address oMain advantage is decreased circuit complexity in the decoder oDisadvantages: Must guard against inadvertent accesses due to multiple addresses Somewhat inefficient use of overall address space Example: Interface a peripheral that only uses 16 addresses oRequires 4 address bits to select 1 of the 16 internal addresses oOther system address bits used for the chip enable signal Cont.

12 BUS Operations o16-bit system --12 bits for enable! oTry 6 bits for decoder instead 74138 decoder chip is commonly used for address selection (a 1-of-8 decoder) o3 address bit input o8 output select lines (active low) o3 chip select lines (to select the 74138) Cont. Figure 5.5 74138 Decode Cheap

13 BUS Operations Example: Interface two 2Kx8 memory chips to a 16-bit address system oStarting addresses for the chips should be $5000 and $6800 oEach chip has a chip enable (select) signal, E1* (active low) oAddress ranges for the 2 chips are shown below Fixed bits are routed to the decoder inputs Varying bits are routed to the chip address lines Cont.

14 BUS Operations Cont.

15 BUS Operations Now, use '138 output Y3 to select a 512x8 memory chip oY3 asserted for addresses in the range $5800 to $5FFF (2KB) o512 addresses requires 9 address bits, A0 to A8; bits A9 and A10 are not needed oAs a result, partial address decoding is being used where each physical address will respond to 4 addresses Example: address 1 in the chip is accessed whenever addresses 01011 xx 000000001 are applied to the memory system $5801 $5A01 $5C01 $5E01 Cont..

16 BUS Operations Modes of operation oInternal parts of MCU: CPU, memory, registers oExternal parts: Pins for I/O and bus signals oTo reduce pin count, some pins may have more than one function oFor HC11, operating mode determines how pins are used Select the operating mode using MODA and MODB pins at reset Cont..

17 BUS Operations Single-chip mode oNo external memory or I/O chips Dont need external bus Ports B and C are used as I/O ports oReduced system cost oLimited to on-chip RAM, ROM and EEPROM Expanded multiplexed mode oPorts B and C used as address and data bus Allows connections to external memory and I/O chips Port B = A15 - A8 Port C = AD7-AD0 (A7-A0 multiplexed with D7-D0) oControl bus signals Cont..

18 BUS Operations Strobe A/address strobe pin (STRA/AS) used as AS Strobe B/read/write pin (STRB/R/W*) used as R/W* Special bootstrap mode oTest mode oGenerally used to load in a test program, EEPROM programming, or running a monitor program oOn reset, HC11 executes code located in the Boot ROM (BF00-BFFF for 68HC11E9) Loads more program code using serial interface Used by PCBUG11 Listing of code in Reference Manual (Appendix B) Cont..

19 BUS Operations Special test mode oIntended for use by manufacturer only oNot much documentation available oUsed to test the chip Chip specifications oAppendix A of Technical Data manual Maximum ratings Recommended operating conditions DC electrical characteristics AC electrical characteristics Power dissipation Cont..

20 BUS Operations oImportant when interfacing with other devices; Be aware of Current limits Voltage limits Fan in/fan out DC electrical characteristics VDD 5 V 3 V VOL Maximum low-level output voltage 0.1V 0.1V VOH Minimum high-level output voltage 4.9V 2.9V VIL Maximum low-level input voltage 1.0V 0.6V VIH Minimum high-level input voltage 3.5V 2.1V oVOL = 0.1 V Cont..

21 BUS operations oVOH = VDD - 0.8 V (ILOAD = -0.8 mA) oVIL = 0.2 x VDD oVIH = 0.7 x VDD oID = 25 mA AC electrical characteristics oTiming information

22 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Timing diagrams show the changes that occur in a signal or group of signals over time Figure 7.1 Basic timing diagram information Cont..

23 Timing diagrams and timing requirements System clock oBus transitions occur in relation to system clock oCalled the E clock in 68HC11 1/4 crystal frequency Low - internal process High - reading or writing data Some definitions: oPropagation delay: amount of time used by a device to change its output in response to an input change oSetup time: length of time that an input to a device must be stable before a clock transition oHold time: length of time that an input to a device must remain stable after a clock transition Cont..

24 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Figure 7.2 Example timing diagram for a write cycle Cont..

25 Timing diagrams and timing requirements tcyc 500 ns min PWEH 222 ns min tf 20 ns max tPDSU 100 ns min tr 20 ns max tPDH 50 ns min PWEL 227 ns min Cont..

26 Timing diagrams and timing requirements 68HC11 timing specifications (E-series manual pages A18, 20) Cont..

27 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Cont..

28 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Timing analysis and interfacing external devices to the 68HC11 oGeneral observation: the timing characteristics of the external device (e.g., memory unit) must meet or exceed the timing requirements of the HC11 Must compare the related timing values in the HC11 read/write timing diagram to the values in the device's diagram Must take into account any delays due to external circuitry such as the decoder oNote that in the HC11... Address information is provided to the external device Cont..

29 Timing diagrams and timing requirements o(using the multiplexed address/data bus) in the low half cycle of the E-clock Data to be read/written is placed on the data bus only in the high half cycle of the Eclock All read and write operations MUST take place in 1 E- cycle External devices and circuitry must be designed to meet this requirement Cannot use wait states as you can in other microprocessor systems oIntel 8085: Slower devices can use READY input to request wait states oProcessor maintains address, data, and control signals Cont..

30 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Expanded multiplexed mode o68HC11 supplies external bus signals Port B = A15-A8 Port C = A7-A0 multiplexed with D7-D0 oAddress usually must be valid during entire operation Need to latch A7-A0 (using 74HC373, for example) oUse external logic to derive control signals Chip enable/select Read/Write Output enable Cont..

31 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Read operation oMemory puts data on bus when clock rises oMCU latches data when clock falls Cont..

32 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Write operation oMCU puts data on bus when clock rises oMemory latches data when clock falls Cont..

33 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Example analysis: consider the following very general circuit layout that interfaces the HC11 to a 6264 Fast Static Ram (8k x 8) (figure shows a 6164 but well use 6264 in lab) Figure 7.6 Expanded mode operation Cont..

34 Timing diagrams and timing requirements oObservations on the circuit 74373 is used as the address latch to save the lower 8 bits of the address that are on Port C only during the first half of the E-clock cycle Discrete logic is used to derive the write and read enable signals for the memory chip (W* and G*) Both can only be asserted in the second half of the E-clock cycle 74138 is used for address decoding to generate a memory chip enable (chip select) signal (E1*) Since the E-clock enables the 138, the decoder is only active in 2nd half cycle Memory chip can not be enabled in the 1 st half cycle oThis impacts some of the timing relationships Cont..

35 Timing diagrams and timing requirements oTiming relationships are derived by comparing the timing diagrams of the memory chip and the HC11 and considering the external circuitry where necessary. oRead operation: HC11: Expects external device to place data on data bus in time for it to be read External device must hold data until E-clock falls, but must remove it (and go to high impedance state) before HC11 places next address on bus 6264: Outputs data after receiving the address and the E* and G* signals Cont..

36 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Timing constraints oHow long does 6264 take to output data after receiving address and enable signals? oHow long does it keep data on the bus? oWrite operation: 6264: Needs address, data, E*, and W* signals oWrite occurs only when both E* and W* are low oData must be held on bus until either E* or W* rises HC11: Places address on address bus and latch After E-clock rises, places data on data bus and holds it Cont..

37 Timing diagrams and timing requirements oHave to take into account the propagation delays due to the external circuitry Decoder (74138): PDDEC = 25 ns Inverter (7404): PDINV = 15 ns Latch (74573): PDLATCH = 23 ns Nand (7400): PDNAND = 15 ns oRead operations (read cycle 2 of 6264) Cont..

38 Timing diagrams and timing requirements oTiming relationships for read operation: Cont..

39 Timing diagrams and timing requirements oWrite operations (write cycle 2 of 6264) Cont..

40 Timing diagrams and timing requirements oTiming relationship for write operation: Cont..

41 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Timing operation for write operation(contd): Cont..

42 Timing diagrams and timing requirements In the lab, you will be required to design and construct an expanded mode memory interface oStrongly encourage you to use Figure 2-23 in the HC11 Reference Manual as a guide In this figure, the memory chip is always enabled The 138 decoder is used to derive read and write enables and thus replaces the discrete logic used in Spasovs example oBoth methods will (and have) worked in the lab but using the 138 for write/read signals is recommended Fewer chips -- all fit on a single strip of protoboard Shorter runs of inter-chip wires oTiming analysis equations must be updated to reflect the circuit that you design! Cont..

43 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Cycle-by-cycle operation oAppendix A of Reference Manual shows cycle-by-cycle execution for each instruction oShows contents of address and data buses during each cycle oExample: STAA (ext) Cont..

44 Timing diagrams and timing requirements Cont.. Cycle Addr BusData Bus R/W* 1 OP B7 1 2 OP+1 hh 1 3 OP+2 ll 1 4 hhll (A) 0 Example: STAA (IND, X) Cycle Addr Bus Data Bus R/W* 1 OP A7 1 2 OP+1 ff 1 3 FFFF -- 1 4 X+ff (A) 0

45 Timing diagrams and timing requirements General ideas of bus expansion and interfacing oBus composition and components oAddressing bus devices oDecoding bus addresses oTiming diagrams HC11 interfacing and timing requirements Modes of operation


Download ppt "Bus Operations and Interfacing. Overview Focus on the microprocessor bus oBus operations in general oDevice addressing and decoding oTiming diagrams and."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google