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2014 GED ® test: Changing Lives Begins with You! Bonnie Goonen – June Rall – Tammy Sutcliffe.

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Presentation on theme: "2014 GED ® test: Changing Lives Begins with You! Bonnie Goonen – June Rall – Tammy Sutcliffe."— Presentation transcript:

1 2014 GED ® test: Changing Lives Begins with You! Bonnie Goonen – bv73008@aol.combv73008@aol.com June Rall – jrall@irsc.edujrall@irsc.edu Tammy Sutcliffe – tsutclif@irsc.edutsutclif@irsc.edu 1

2 2

3 CHANGING LIVES THROUGH KNOWLEDGE

4 Step 1 Acknowledge that the world continues to change and our educational programs are connected to this change 4

5 The adult education system cannot stand still while the world around us is changing. Cheryl Keenan, Director of Adult Education and Literacy, OVAE NCFL 2013 5

6 A National Crisis 4 million jobs unfilled 1 40 million adults without a HS diploma 2 The Problems Extensive Reach Impacts the economy – nationally and locally Impacts society Strains the safety net system Devastates adults & families who want a better life Sources: 1) Bureau of Labor and Statistics Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey - August 06, 2) Adults ages 16 years and older, without a high school diploma and further training or degrees, based on 2010 U.S. Census data 6

7 Our students need proof that they possess the BIG FIVE 1. Critical thinking skills 2. Problem-solving skills 3. Written communication skills 4. Oral communication skills 5. Digital literacy 7

8 Our Goal: Preparing Students Connect workplace skills to curriculum Connect concepts to those needed for entrance to college Actively engage students through contextualized instruction that makes a difference 8

9 Step 2 Recognize the Challenges and Stay Informed

10 Time Out for an Update... 10

11 As implementation continues... More than 106,000 modules scheduled first 10 weeks More than 200,000 individuals signed up for MyGEDMyGED Passing rate is similar to 2002 Series test - ~70% 95% of test takers who score in the likely to pass range of the GED Ready - pass the operational test 11

12 The Advantage of GED Ready Students who take GED Ready and earn a score of 158+ pass the GED ® test (95%) earn a score below 143 do not pass the test earn a score between 143-157 have a 50/50 chance of passing the test GED Ready matters. 12

13 There is only one problem... Only 8% of test- takers are taking GED Ready prior to taking the operational version of the test. 13

14 Enhanced Score Report: A Powerful Tool To access the Enhanced Score Report, have students log into MyGED and visit the My Scores section. Then select View Results for GED Ready or View Details" for the GED® test to see the report. Ask students to print the report or review it with them on the computer.Enhanced Score ReportMyGED My Score What My Score Means How Can I Score Higher Review My Written Answers 14

15 GED Analytics Secure access for educators and administrators, as determined by state Ability to create and generate reports on demand By testing site Test-takers by name, data, etc. Local vs. state testing State vs. national testing Option for custom reports Filter data on-the-fly for instant reports based on selected dates or data fields Pull data from any report into any format Anytime, anywhere access through an Internet connection to the cloud-based system 15

16 Because of analytics... ModuleTesting TimeRaw Score Points Reasoning Through Language Arts 150 minutes [25 min + 45 min ER] + [10 min. break] + [70 min] 65 raw score points Mathematics 115 minutes49 raw score points Science 90 minutes [2 SA of ~ 10 minutes each) 40 raw score points Social Studies 90 minutes [65 min + 25 min ER] 44 raw score points Total Battery~ 7.5 hours 16

17 Areas of concern... Math continues to be most difficult (large percentage failing by just 1-4 raw score points) Different test takers have gaps CR items are a challenge (even basic points of organization and grammar not being obtained) Test takers are not accessing support available (materials/tutorials/practice tests) 17

18 Adult Educators & MyGED TM Educators want better ways to connect with students, when registration and scheduling are online. Adult educator portal with ability to: Advertise availability of local classes and resources Review scores on practice tests and operational tests Recommend areas of focus for studying Provide ongoing support, guidance, and encouragement online and offline 18

19 http://www.gedtestingservice.com/ 19

20 Step 3 Know Your Students Celebrate Generational Diversity 20

21 Talking about our generation... Traditionalists Baby Boomer Generation X Generation Z between 1965 & 1982 between 1927 & 1945 between 1945 & 1964 between 1982 & mid 2000s Millennial G. I.s between 1901 & 1926 between mid 2000s – 2020? 21

22 GED ® student generation 22

23 instant access Step 4 Embrace Technology 23

24 New Realities How many gadgets do you have? mp3 or iPod E-book reader Tablet, such as an iPad Laptop computer Smart phone Cell phone 24

25 Would you really want to go back? 25

26 Being Tech-Able is Essential Motivates students Builds collaboration skills Requires reasoning Enhances problem-solving skills Develops skills for the future Necessary for success 26

27 Todays Media: Smart Phones, Twitter, Facebook, You Tube 27

28 using technology successfully in the classroom is a not a skill-set mindset 28

29 Step 5 Understand that College and Career Readiness Standards are Not just for GED® students 29

30 New Realities Assessments Curriculum Design Lesson Planning Instruction Student Learning College and Career Readiness Standards for Adult Education 30

31 College and Career Readiness Standards 31 http://lincs.ed.gov/publi cations/pdf/CCRStandar dsAdultEd.pdf

32 What are the big ideas that I want students to remember... 40 days (the test) 40 days (the test) 40 months (college) 40 months (college) 40 years (life) 40 years (life) 32

33 Step 6 Incorporate reading and writing into every classroom, every day 33

34 Language Arts Practices Closely read text that is more complex greater in length Determine what is explicitly stated Draw specific comparisons between two texts Distinguish between valid arguments and faulty reasoning Distinguish between supported and unsupported claims Make logical inferences based on evidence Draw relevant and sufficient evidence from the text(s) 34

35 CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES (Integrating Reading and Writing)

36 Constructed Response on the 2014 GED ® test CRs are best way of directly assessing Writing skills Higher-order thinking skills Four CR items RLA ER – 45 min., ~20% of test Social Studies ER – 25 min., ~20% of test 2 Science Short Answer - ~ 10 min. each, 15% of test 36

37 Lets look at RLA ER requires the following skills Skills of use of evidence Skills of ways of expressing meaning Skills of language conventions and usage... To response to this standard prompt In your response, analyze both positions presented to determine which one is best supported. Use relevant and specific evidence from the article to support your response. 37

38 Lets look at Social Studies ER requires the following skills Skills of reading & writing in a social studies context Skills of applying social studies concepts... To response to this standard prompt In your response, develop an argument about how the authors position reflects the enduring issue expressed in the excerpt. Incorporate relevant and specific evidence from the excerpt, article, and your own knowledge to support your analysis. 38

39 The science short answer requires the following skills... Cite specific textual evidence Develop a logical argument Using the evidence, present a line of reasoning Apply understanding of a science concept One SA always tests experimental design Identifying a research question Designing an investigation Justifying a line of reasoning 39

40 Can you see the similarities between content modules? All measure higher-order thinking skills All reflect the overall content of the module All incorporate skills of close reading All emphasize creation of an argument Science and Social Studies include background knowledge for highest scoring potential 40

41 There is nothing to fear but fear itself According to GEDTS, Even test-takers with lower skill levels CAN attain points on the CR items Scoring a 1 on trait 3 of the RLA ER only requires about 7 – 10 lines ofmostly grammatically-correct writing (= 2 raw score points, the same as answering 2 M/C items correctly) Scoring a 1 on trait 2 of RLA ER just requires a clear organizational structure – even if the content is off (= 2 raw score points) Like an empty closet organizer Make use of the Answer Guidelines documents www.gedtestingservice.com/educators/2014testresources 41

42 This for Trait 1 (Creation of arguments and use of evidence)... This article presents arguments from both supporters and critics of Daylight Saving Time who disagree about the practice's impact on energy consumption and safety. Both sides provide good support for their position, but the argument against Daylight Saving Time is stronger and more complete. It responds to points made in the argument in favor of Daylight Saving Time and also incorporates arguments of its own. 42

43 Instead of this... ln my way its good because in DST is good for lot of people. The studies has indicated that traveling home from work or school in daylight is safer. Nearly three decades of research shows an 8-11% reduction in crashes invilingpedestrains and a 6-10% decrease in crashes for vehicle occupants after the spring shift to DST.ln sunlight we can finishes our chores. In everything new things takes time to adjust. After some days went we feel this is the right thing. 43

44 This for Trait 2 (Development of ideas and structure)... Supporters of DST cite three decades of research that shows an 8 – 11% reduction in pedestrian related accidents and an 6 – 10% reduction in vehicle only crashes after the spring shift to DST. However, they have not indicated the risk of injury when DST ends in the fall. Those against the use of DST cite one study that showed an increase in pedestrian related accident immediately after the end of DST in the fall. 44

45 Instead of this... Pros-daylight savings time 1. Because the days are longer and nights are longer, there is more criminal activity, in that crime normally occurs at night. 2. Driving home from work when it is daylight is safer, therefore saving a lot of lives. 3. The more sun, the less light. This saves on electricity. 45

46 This for Trait 3 (Clarity and command of standard English conventions)... This article presents arguments from both supporters and critics of Daylight Saving Time who disagree about the practice's impact on energy consumption and safety. Both sides provide good support for their position, but the argument against Daylight Saving Time is stronger and more complete. It responds to points made in the argument in favor of Daylight Saving Time and also incorporates arguments of its own. 46

47 Instead of this... ln my way its good because in DST is good for lot of people. The studies has indicated that traveling home from work or school in daylight is safer. Nearly three decades of research shows an 8-11% reduction in crashes invilingpedestrains and a 6-10% decrease in crashes for vehicle occupants after the spring shift to DST.ln sunlight we can finishes our chores. In everything new things takes time to adjust. 47

48 Making a Difference Dedicate time to writing instruction across the curriculum Use evidence-based reading/writing strategies Integrate a contextualized approach to language (grammar) Integrate complex nonfiction and fiction text Familiarize students with resources Set high expectations 48

49 Tools for Constructed Response 49

50 Need more information? http://www.gedtestingservice.com/educators/2014 testresources 50

51 51 Sample Lesson Plan to Get Started

52 Its about social studies and science too... 52 Comprehend/analyze complex text Understand the big ideas Develop an experimentation process Produce a response that provides a valid claim that is supported by evidence from text(s) as well as relevant background knowledge Produce a response that provides an explanation supported by evidence and/or the scientific method Problem solve

53 Step 8 Take on the Challenge of Higher-Level Mathematics 53

54 Problem Power x ¹ Spy Mission You are a spy on a special mission. To crack the safe code and get the important documents, you must enter the digits 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 into two keypads, once as the greatest possible sum, and the other as the lowest possible difference. CAUTION: For each keypad, you may only enter each digit once. Fail to do this and you will trigger the alarm. Good Luck! 54

55 Spy Mission The greatest possible sum is 1839 (975 + 864). In order to get the greatest sum, we put the largest digits in the column with the largest place value, the next largest digits in the next column, and so on. The greatest possible difference is 47 (745 - 698). Regrouping is key! 55 Problem Power x ¹

56 56

57 Example of Student Problem Solving without guidance 57

58 Real-World Goal of Practices Modeling ProblemFormulateValidate Compute Interpret Report 58

59 A Few Problem-Solving Strategies Look for patterns Consider all possibilities Make an organized list Draw a picture Guess and check Write an equation Construct a table or graph Act it out Use objects Work backward Solve a simpler (or similar) problem 59

60 Solution Pathways 60 Polyas Four Steps to Problem Solving Polya, George. How To Solve It, 2nd ed. (1957). Princeton University Press. Understand the problem Devise a plan Carry out the plan Look back (reflect)

61 Explicit instruction in problem solving matters Shows consistent positive effects on performance Places students attention on mathematical ideas Develops mathematical power Develops students beliefs that they are capable of doing mathematics Provides ongoing assessment data 61

62 Integrate Problem Solving 62

63 Meaning Making The single greatest tool/instructional method we can use in our classrooms 63

64 Dont Forget... 64

65 65 Mathematical problem solving skills are critical to successfully function in todays technologically advanced society. Solving word problems requires understanding the relationships and outcomes of problems. You must make connections between the different meanings, interpretations, and relationships to mathematical operations. Van de Walle, 2004 Sample Lesson Plan to Get Started

66 Its All Connected Close reading skills of complex text Integrated reading and writing Mathematical reasoning Graphic literacy Use of tools Big ideas – thematic instruction Success for students! 66

67 Step 9 T ake advantage of the resources that are available 67

68 http://floridatechnet.org/ http://www.gedtestingservice.com/ http://www.fldoe.org/ workforce/dwdframe/ ad_frame.asp 68

69 69

70 70

71 With lots more on the World Wide Web www.commoncoreconversation.com/ 71

72 Step 10 Whats your next step in making a difference? 72

73 73 1.Name the five wealthiest people in the world. 2.Name the last five Heisman trophy winners. 3.Name the last five winners of the Miss America. 4.Name ten people who have won the Nobel or Pulitzer Prize. 5.Name the last half dozen Academy Award winner for best actor and actress. 6.Name the last decade's worth of World Series winners. - Charles Schultz

74 74 1.List a few teachers who aided your journey through school. 2.Name three friends who have helped you through a difficult time. 3.Name five people who have taught you something worthwhile. 4.Think of a few people who have made you feel appreciated and special. 5.Think of five people with whom you enjoy spending time. - Charles Schultz

75 Do we make a difference? Absolutely. Every day. Whether we know it or not. The question to ask ourselves is: What kind of difference do I want to make today in the lives of my students, their families, my colleagues, and my profession? The Inspiring Teacher - Bob Sullo Remember, its all about our students. Do we make a difference? Absolutely. Every day. Whether we know it or not. The question to ask ourselves is: What kind of difference do I want to make today in the lives of my students, their families, my colleagues, and my profession? The Inspiring Teacher - Bob Sullo Remember, its all about our students. 75

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77 High achievement always occurs in the framework of high expectation. Charles F. Kettering (1876-1958) Bonnie Goonen bv73008@aol.com June Rall jrall@irsc.edu Tammy Sutcliffe tsutclif@irsc.edu 77

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