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Welcome to Unpacking Curriculum Standards! Presented by Kathy Gates and Alison Nye, USD #497 Learning Coaches Please Get a Laptop and Log In.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Unpacking Curriculum Standards! Presented by Kathy Gates and Alison Nye, USD #497 Learning Coaches Please Get a Laptop and Log In."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to Unpacking Curriculum Standards! Presented by Kathy Gates and Alison Nye, USD #497 Learning Coaches Please Get a Laptop and Log In

2 Objectives Understand what standards are and why they exist. Understand the difference between content and performance objectives. Understand the process for analyzing a standard.

3 NORMS Take care of your own needs Help your neighbor Dont be afraid to ask questions Have fun!

4 Icebreaker 1.What made you choose this professional development? 2.What grade/content area do you teach? 3.What color is your toothbrush? 4.If you could pick your destination for spring break, where would you go? 5.What do you hope to walk away with today? 6.Paper or plastic? Salty or sweet?

5 S.M.A.R.T. SpecificIs my goal clearly stated and directly related to using my new knowledge? MeasurableHow will others know that I have met my goal? What student data will document the results? AttainableCan the goal be reached within the timeframe of the plan? Results-OrientedIf my goal is met, what will be the result? Time-BoundWhen do I plan to reach my goal?

6 Why Standards? Administrators, teachers, students, parents, and the community need a clear vision of what is expected in terms of student learning. Clarity is achieved when districts and schools formally identify standards and then use them consistently throughout the curriculum process. Succeeding with Standards (p. 2) By Judy F. Carr and Douglas E. Harris

7 Intent of Standards Encompass accurate, high-quality content and skills. A balanced, coherent articulation of [common] expectations for student learning. To provide the structure from which a deep and rich local curriculum can be built. Succeeding with Standards Judy F. Carr and Douglas E. Harris

8 Where do they come from? Professional Organizations Examples: NSTA NCTM NCTE State Board of Education KSDE (Identifies assessed indicators) School District Local Board of Education

9 Standard 1 Benchmark 1Benchmark 2Benchmark 3 Indicator 1 Indicator 4 Indicator 3 Indicator 2 Indicator 1 Indicator 2 Indicator 1 Indicator 2 Indicator 3 Kansas Content Standards

10 With a partner discuss the following question: What is the difference between a standard, a benchmark, and an indicator?

11 Standards are general statements of what students should know, understand, and/or be able to do. Benchmarks are specific statements of what students should know and be able to do at a specific point in their schooling. Indicators are statements of the knowledge or skills which students demonstrate in order to meet a benchmark.

12 Challenges??

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14 Addressing the Achievement Gap What tools do we have available? MAP Data State Assessment Data Learning Coaches Instructional Resource Guides (curriculum alignment)

15 What will it take? There are 3 kinds of curricula – they must be considered together and improved together. Written Curriculum (Standards and Indicators) Taught CurriculumTested Curriculum

16 Alignment Maintaining connections between all three types of curriculum. Taught Curriculum Tested Curriculum Written Curriculum Standards and Indicators

17 Taught Curriculum How do you determine what will be taught from day to day, hour to hour, in your classroom? What kinds of factors influence your decisions?

18 In international comparisons, the highest- scoring countries attempt to teach less than a third as many topics as those found in U.S. textbooks. Narrowing the curriculum, when done right, is not just permissible but essential.In international comparisons, the highest- scoring countries attempt to teach less than a third as many topics as those found in U.S. textbooks. Narrowing the curriculum, when done right, is not just permissible but essential. Results Now, Schmoker, 2006 McRel research 116 standard documents116 standard documents 200 different standards200 different standards 3093 specific topics (benchmarks)3093 specific topics (benchmarks) Estimated hours for students to learnEstimated hours for students to learn Increase schooling from 13 years to yearsIncrease schooling from 13 years to years Worried about narrowing the curriculum??

19 Keep in mind… A program is not a curriculum The standards are the curriculum not a textbook.

20 Where is the written curriculum, anyway?writtencurriculum

21 Answering DuFours Questions What do we want all students to learn? How will we know when theyve learned it? What will we do when they dont learn? What will we do when theyve already learned it?

22 Unpacking StandardsIts All About the Nouns and Verbs!

23 What do students need to be able to KNOW and DO? Knowledge Vocabulary Definitions Concepts Laws, Formulas Key facts Critical Details Sequence & timelines Grant Wiggins, Jay McTighe, Understanding by Design, Skills Decoding, computation Communication skills – listening, speaking, writing Thinking skills – compare, infer, analyze Research – inquiry, investigate Study Skills – notetaking Group Skills

24 But its more than just that… Whats necessary to know/do? Whats important to know/do? Whats nice to know/do?

25 Unpacking Standards The student… identifies and determines the meaning of figurative language, similes, metaphors, analogies,hyperbole, onomatopoeia,personification, and idioms.

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27 With your table discuss: 1.Choose a standard. 2.What is in the standard? 3.In your own words, paraphrase it, make notes on the page, highlight, etc… 4.Are there prerequisites? What is between the lines? 5.What can your students already do? How do you know?

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29 Think with the End in Mind Assessment – What will the student be able to do independently to be able to demonstrate proficiency in the indicator?

30 Course: Indicator: Content:Skills: (verb) How will this look in my classroom? Strategies:Activities:Resources:Assessments:

31 Course: Indicator: Content: State the content explicitly. Skills: (verb) How will this look in my classroom? Strategies: What methods will the teacher use to ENGAGE students? Examples: Explicit instruction Read Aloud Guided Practice Cooperative Learning Labs or Investigations Guided Inquiry Project-based learning Demonstrations Activities: What will students DO to learn the content; may include practice. Resources: Be specific! Examples: Textbook Pages Guest speakers Websites Supplementary Materials Assessments: How will the student independently demonstrate proficiency in the indicator?

32 Course: Indicator: Content: State the content explicitly. Skills: (verb) How will this look in my classroom? Strategies: What methods will the teacher use to ENGAGE students? Examples: Explicit instruction Read Aloud Guided Practice Cooperative Learning Labs or Investigations Guided Inquiry Project-based learning Demonstrations Activities: What will students DO to learn the content; may include practice. Resources: Be specific! Examples: Textbook Pages Guest speakers Websites Supplementary Materials Assessments: How will the student independently demonstrate proficiency in the indicator?

33 Course: Biology Indicator: The student understands cell functions involve specific chemical reactions. Content: E. Identify the monomers from which organic polymers are synthesized (i.e. polysaccharides from monosaccharides, proteins from amino acids, and nucleic acids from nucleotides). Skills: (verb) Identify +- Strategies: Labs Cooperative Learning Bell work Science Notebook Journal Vocabulary Strategies: word wall, vocabulary cards (adaptation of Foyer model) Possible Sentences Exit Questions EPR strategies Revisit throughout the year; cyclic review Activities: 1.Notes 2.Simplified diagrams 3.Vocabulary/definitions 4.Food labs; carbohydrates lab specifically (Lisa) 5.Build insulin molecule (Lisa) 6.Chewing soda crackers; polysaccharides can be broken down into a simple sugars (Bill/Lisa) 7.Concept map 8.Introduce nucleic acid Note: Teach nucleic acid with DNA unit; model building. Resources: Holt Biology textbook (chapters 7-9) Glencoe Biology textbook Teaching Biology with -+-- Assessments: 1.Common Assessment 2.Lab Write-ups 3.Fill in the concept map

34 Courtesy Auburn-Washburn School District, USD437

35 Civics Benchmark 1:2 (A) Investigate how the rule of law is used to protect the rights of people and to support the common good eminent domain martial law during disasters health and safety issues Civics Benchmark 2:2 (K) What are the civic values inherent in the US Constitution, Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence? 1 st Amendment Equality Human Dignity Civic Responsibility Sovereignty of the people

36 VocabularyKey ConceptsLesson Plan Ideas Other Standards VocabularyKey ConceptsLesson Plan Ideas Other Standards

37 VocabularyKey Concepts Questions I still have: VocabularyKey Concepts Questions I still have:

38 What does research tell us about standards-based classrooms? Marzano Strategies PERCENTILE GAIN Summarizing and note taking34 % Reinforcing effort and providing recognition 29% Homework and practice28% Nonlinguistic representations27% Cooperative learning27% Setting objectives and providing feedback 23% Questions, cues, and advance organizers 22% What Works in Classroom Instruction by Robert J. Marzano, et. al.

39 Insert graphic organizers

40 Insert Cats flashcards

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47 Its Your Turn!! Continuum of learning link


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