Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Evolution in Bioinformatics Training Programs ISMB Stockholm, WEB 09 June 30, 2009 Michelle D. Brazas Ontario Institute for Cancer Research.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Evolution in Bioinformatics Training Programs ISMB Stockholm, WEB 09 June 30, 2009 Michelle D. Brazas Ontario Institute for Cancer Research."— Presentation transcript:

1 Evolution in Bioinformatics Training Programs ISMB Stockholm, WEB 09 June 30, 2009 Michelle D. Brazas Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

2 Some Evolution Trees Look Like This… Darwin

3 In Bioinformatics, Trees Looks Like This…

4 The First Generation of CBW Bioinformatics Workshops 1999: Need for trained bioinformatic professionals –Only a few bioinformatics training programs existed –White paper: Bioinformatics Curriculum Recommendations for Undergraduate, Graduate and Professional programs (2002) The Canadian Bioinformatics Workshops (CBW) series was created in 1999 –Scientific Director: Francis Ouellette; Scientific Manager: Stephen Hearst –Core Faculty: Stephen Hearst, David Wishart, Chris Hogue, Francois Major, Christoph Sensen

5 Model for 1st Generation Workshops Workshops offered in various cities across Canada –Travel to participants to reach widest audience –Fredericton, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Windsor, Calgary, Edmonton, & Vancouver

6 Model for 1st Generation Workshops Workshops offered in various cities across Canada –Travel to participants to reach widest audience –Fredericton, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Windsor, Calgary, Edmonton, & Vancouver Class size limited to 50 participants per workshop –Lectures + hands-on labs to gain experience using the tools + marked assignments –Highly interactive courses which included events for participant & faculty networking

7 Model for 1st Generation Workshops Workshops offered in various cities across Canada –Travel to participants to reach widest audience –Fredericton, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Windsor, Calgary, Edmonton, & Vancouver Class size limited to 50 participants per workshop –Lectures + hands-on labs to gain experience using the tools + marked assignments –Highly interactive courses which included events for participant & faculty networking Taught by faculty prominent in their field –Faculty develop & deliver material –Material reviewed and updated yearly at stakeholder meetings –Assisted by trained teaching assistants

8 Model for 1st Generation Workshops Workshops offered in various cities across Canada –Travel to participants to reach widest audience –Fredericton, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Windsor, Calgary, Edmonton, & Vancouver Class size limited to 50 participants per workshop –Lectures + hands-on labs to gain experience using the tools + marked assignments –Highly interactive courses which included events for participant & faculty networking Taught by faculty prominent in their field –Faculty develop & deliver material –Material reviewed and updated yearly at stakeholder meetings –Assisted by trained teaching assistants Hardware & software provided for participants –Most did not own personal laptops

9 Model for 1st Generation Workshops Introductory courses offered –Introduction to Bioinformatics Workshop (2 weeks) –Genomics Workshop (1 week) –Proteomics Workshop (1 week) –Developing the Tools Workshop (1 week) Certificate in Bioinformatics –Required 110 hrs class time: –Certificate was accredited by University of Toronto, University of New Brunswick, and University of British Columbia since by 2003, still only 14 universities across Canada offered any material in bioinformatics Bioinformatics (2 weeks) Genomics (1wk) Proteomics (1wk) Developing the Tools (1wk)

10 Changing Landscape All major institutions have bioinformatics content –Introductory material now offered by universities + colleges –Degree programs –Independent courses –Integration of bioinformatics material in most life science courses –Other tutorials and online courses in bioinformatics Declining interest in 1st generation CBW workshops –Today, students already receive extensive exposure to introductory bioinformatics material –CBW saw declining enrolment in 1st generation workshops ( )

11 CBW: st generation CBW model was extremely successful –CBW addressed growing gap in scientific training –CBW filled niche market in new field of bioinformatics –Trained >1000 participants & granted >175 certificates –Participants ranged from graduate students to researchers from academia, government and industry –Participants were drawn from across Canada, US & international

12 Time for re-invention of bioinformatics workshops Mission and vision of CBW remain CBW Mission: To accelerate the use of bioinformatics as a tool in health and life sciences through education, networking and outreach CBW Vision: To become a world leader in bioinformatics education, networking and outreach CBW: Beyond 2007

13

14 Science 319: 1599 And the Bioinformatics Evolution Continues

15 The Second Generation of CBW Bioinformatics Workshops Many advances in genomic & proteomic technologies, resulting in new data and bioinformatics tools –Need for advanced training in these new bioinformatic topics –Need for continuing education style workshops New model & new CBW workshops introduced in day workshops on advanced bioinformatics topics –Interpretation of Gene Lists from -omics Studies –Informatics on High-Throughput Sequencing Data –Clinical Genomics and Biomarker Discovery –Systems and Network Biology –Essential Statistics in Biology

16

17 Model for 2nd Generation Workshops Workshops offered in one location –High awareness of bioinformatics need –Participants willing to travel to gain required training Taught by faculty prominent in their field –Same high quality instruction Class size limited to 30 participants –Same highly interactive formula: lectures + hands-on labs –Additional component: participants are required to bring their own data 2-day short course –Addresses time constraints of participants –Knowledgeable participants already experienced with the technology Personal laptops –Majority of students possess their own laptops & prefer their own environment

18 Sample 2nd Generation Workshop: Interpreting Gene Lists Faculty: Gary Bader, Quaid Morris and Wyeth Wasserman Day 1 Introduction to gene lists –Tools: GO Ontology, Cytoscape Finding over-represented gene functions –Tools: GSEA, GeneMania Lab time: Working with your own data Day 2 Predicting transcriptional regulation –Tools: oPOSSUM, Galaxy Pathway and network analysis –Tools: Cytoscape Lab time: Working with your own data

19 New Challenges in Bioinformatics Training Computational power required by large data sets and programs is more than the capacity of a personal laptop –High-throughput sequencing data sets are large & computationally intense –Cloud computing models or server clusters required 3.2PB storage 6,224 cores

20 New Challenges in Bioinformatics Training Participants are unfamiliar with command line –With new datasets & tools, having command line experience is necessary Statistical background is often weak –Compounded by larger and more complex datasets

21 New Opportunities Basics in bioinformatics –Command line familiarity and statistics basics Responsive development & delivery of new bioinformatics courses –New technologies will continue to arise, generating new datasets –To meet the need for bioinformatic training to accompany these advances, new bioinformatic courses will need to be rapidly generated & delivered Techniques in data integration –Future bioinformatic courses will need to teach data integration techniques rather than just techniques for individual data analysis –E.g. Pathways, Systems Biology, etc. Bioinformatics training programs can utilize new communication technologies to reach wider audiences –Podcasts and other live media streams

22 CBW Sponsors: Past & Present U dO

23 Many Thanks Francis Ouellette Past & present CBW contributors Ontario Institute for Cancer Research


Download ppt "Evolution in Bioinformatics Training Programs ISMB Stockholm, WEB 09 June 30, 2009 Michelle D. Brazas Ontario Institute for Cancer Research."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google