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Introduction What is the Difference between IT, ICT and E-Learning?

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction What is the Difference between IT, ICT and E-Learning?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction What is the Difference between IT, ICT and E-Learning?
Why is it so important to promote E-Learning? What do we mean by IT and ICT? In this definition, IT can be taken to refer to the hardware, software and skills that surround a single stand-alone computer or laptop. Hardware refers to the basic box and add-ons such as printers, scanners, CD-ROM, DVD drive and so forth. Software associated with this definition includes productivity software such as word processors, spreadsheets, databases, and graphics and presentation packages, familiar to most users as Microsoft products such as Word, Excel, Access, Publisher and PowerPoint. In addition there are subject/topic/occupation-specific packages for computer-assisted design, accountancy and a range of other commercial applications. Developing skills in the personal use of IT typically consists of acquiring proficiency in basic Windows operations and increasing degrees of expertise in the use of one or more packages. Training programmes, such as PC Passport, ECDL and Computer Literacy and Information Technology (CLAIT) qualification, focus on taking users through a low-level set of fundamental operations in three packages (most typically a word processor, a spreadsheet application and one other) as a basis for subsequent development. As an initial engagement with computers and their applications, such programmes are often highly motivating and personally rewarding. How do I start using E-Learning?

2 IT, ICT, Elearning - 1 IT (Information Technology)
I T refers to the lowest level of involvement in the use of computer technology Support personal productivity, produce handouts/worksheets Applications Computer user skills, Windows, package training (Word, Excel, Sage) Skills Office/productivity/specific function Software The basic kit: stand-alone computer or laptop with peripherals (printer, scanner, CD-ROM/DVD) Hardware Definition Item using basic stand-alone machines for office/productivity/non-integrated job-specific functions such as computer-assisted design (CAD) or accountancy. The computer is a tool for performing tasks. It supports the lecturer's role by facilitating materials production and class administration. Computers can greatly improve the quality of materials and thus enhance the traditional teaching approach, for example PowerPoint-type presentations with the use of data projectors to display content on the computer monitor on to an overhead projector screen.

3 ICT (Information and Communications Technology)
IT, ICT, Elearning - 2 ICT (Information and Communications Technology) Machines are networked together allowing communication with others on the network and in the outside world via and the Internet. Interaction with peers/students and external bodies. Sharing of software and materials via network/intranet Applications Use of /communications technology, web browsing/web authoring Skills Microsoft Outlook, Internet Explorer/Netscape, Dreamweaver Software Networking together of machines, ideally into a single unified network with access to server-based materials and functions including , intranet, college information systems and the Internet Hardware Definition Item The notion of information and communications technology (ICT) incorporates the networking together of computers. This allows computers to do stand-alone type tasks more effectively, insofar as it potentially makes available a wider range of shared software held centrally on servers and can make management of the system easier and more efficient. The key to ICT, however, is in the possibilities for communication, both within and between institutions. Within a college, the most obvious immediate impact is likely to come from between staff and access to college databases, notably student and course information, together with full management information system data. Externally, there are possibilities for links with other colleges, validating and funding agencies, and with the vast information and communication resources of the World Wide Web. The software added into the mix by the move from IT to ICT includes communications software, such as Microsoft Outlook, browser software such as Internet Explorer and Netscape, and web authoring packages such as Dreamweaver. The capability to produce and maintain a college web site, or its internal equivalent, an intranet, opens new opportunities for communications. The people skills involved can be classified as user/receiver (browsing, reading ) or creator/sender (web authoring, sending )

4 IT, ICT, Elearning - 3 E-Learning
This is the application of IT/ICT to the core business of further education. E-Learning is characterised by the use of ICT to deliver learning experiences and may extend to on-line guidance, assessment and recording of progress. Enhancing the learning experience and creating alternative forms of delivery. Applications Using IT/ICT to facilitate learning and to administer and manage learning and the business activities of the college; exploiting communications technology to create learning and teaching media that exploits the possibilities of on-line education Skills Those used for IT/ICT, Virtual Learning Environments, CD-ROM/web-based learning materials and knowledge resources Software In its simplest form, any networked systems used for IT/ICT. There are endless possibilities for incorporating other systems, for example data projection hardware. Hardware Definition Item Why is it so important to promote elearning? ILT is about the application of IT/ICT to education. So it begins with an understanding of the needs and possibilities for learning. By first considering what students wish to accomplish, it is then possible to look at how the new technologies might make this more possible, by widening participation or increasing engagement, and how they might contribute to raising standards of attainment and the quality of learner experience. It is also possible to look at how the professional skills of tutors and all those supporting learning can be enhanced by adding these new tools to those that already exist, and how the business of the college can be more effectively conducted by all staff. The current state of development of IT/ICT, and particularly the growth of internet-based information services, gives us a significant opportunity to change the way we work to the benefit of all. ILT is about choices that we make for our learners and our colleges that will change the culture. This is most readily illustrated by looking at staff training and skills. The ILT perspective tells us that IT training, such as CLAIT, or qualifications with an ICT flavour such as the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) may enhance the basic skills of staff. Staff will not change the culture or drive forward the college ILT strategy until further work is done that addresses the issue of application of these new skills to learning situations. Evidence from Becta surveys of further education in the UK suggests that between one third and one quarter of college staff whose personal use of IT is competent or advanced would describe themselves as beginners regarding its application to learning. The ILT perspective asks: 'What do we want to do with IT/ICT to improve the learning experience?

5 Click the on the black space to view video
Getting Started Why is it so important to promote elearning? ILT is about the application of IT/ICT to education. So it begins with an understanding of the needs and possibilities for learning. By first considering what students wish to accomplish, it is then possible to look at how the new technologies might make this more possible, by widening participation or increasing engagement, and how they might contribute to raising standards of attainment and the quality of learner experience. It is also possible to look at how the professional skills of tutors and all those supporting learning can be enhanced by adding these new tools to those that already exist, and how the business of the college can be more effectively conducted by all staff. The current state of development of IT/ICT, and particularly the growth of internet-based information services, gives us a significant opportunity to change the way we work to the benefit of all. ILT is about choices that we make for our learners and our colleges that will change the culture. This is most readily illustrated by looking at staff training and skills. The ILT perspective tells us that IT training, such as CLAIT, or qualifications with an ICT flavour such as the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) may enhance the basic skills of staff. Staff will not change the culture or drive forward the college ILT strategy until further work is done that addresses the issue of application of these new skills to learning situations. Evidence from Becta surveys of further education in the UK suggests that between one third and one quarter of college staff whose personal use of IT is competent or advanced would describe themselves as beginners regarding its application to learning. The ILT perspective asks: 'What do we want to do with IT/ICT to improve the learning experience? Click the on the black space to view video

6

7 supporting Supporting learning
Activity outside scheduled learning that complements or supports the main programme, e.g. research on the Web, reinforcement or revision exercises, additional practice, peer and tutor communication. Supporting learning A way of supporting learners that is common practice in a large number of colleges is to provide learners with resources and activities outside scheduled learning time: giving them handouts, assignments, revision exercises, and offering them the opportunity to talk to other learners and members of staff. This type of opportunity is still very much immersed in, and tied to, traditional methods of teaching. E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

8 traditional Traditional teaching tool Supporting learning
Supplementing and supporting traditional teaching, e.g. using PowerPoint as OHP, data projectors and interactive whiteboards for simple display, spreadsheets or handouts from a word processor. Supporting learning Next, there are the traditional methods used by practitioners to deliver learning. At this stage, these traditional methods might be supplemented by electronic media such as a computer, data projector and interactive whiteboard, or may include handouts produced with a word processor rather than hand-written ones, or perhaps even use presentation technology to replace the overhead projector. Here, a number of technologies are used to supplement the teacher-centred approach. This is where many practitioners start: by enhancing practice they know, feel confident with and are familiar with. E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

9 blended Blended learning Traditional teaching tool Supporting learning
Bringing together traditional resources with ILT-based opportunities to create a coherent planned approach, across a whole programme or towards a given learning outcome. Blended learning may reach out to a more direct engagement with learner-support services than is customary with traditional approaches. Traditional teaching tool Supporting learning In some cases, when practitioners have had a chance to experiment and use technologies in the traditional classroom setting, they might want to start using other learner-support mechanisms to supplement the direct face-to-face contact they have with learners. They might begin using to communicate with other members of staff and with their groups of learners, or they might start to place digital resources in a shared folder on the network where learners can access them. E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

10 pace Differentiated pace Blended learning Traditional teaching tool
Using ILT to enable individuals to proceed at their own pace through the common programme, with ILT supporting the process of facilitating individual practitioner support and tracking the progress of individual learners. Supporting learning Whereas blended learning takes place in an environment that assumes that all learners progress towards common learning objectives at the same time, when learning at a differentiated pace, account can be taken of the differing learning speeds and abilities of learners within the framework of learning programmes. Additional electronic resources and computer-based support can be made available to those learners that are struggling, whereas more capable learners can be provided with more challenging activities and assignments. If practitioners are lucky, the college might even have electronic tracking processes in place that enable staff to monitor the progress of groups or individual learners. This certainly facilitates learning at a differentiated pace. E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

11 pathway Differentiated Differentiated pathway pace Blended learning
Using ILT to enable the planning and delivery of an agreed individualised pathway for each learner, with ILT supporting the process of tracking individual progress and facilitating individual tutor support. Such a pathway may benefit from the blended use of other resources, including access to taught sessions. Traditional teaching tool Supporting learning The big leap is to jump from the four opportunities for learning represented so far to offering differentiated pathways. In this situation, learners are offered individualised routes through content and individualised learner support that meets their learning styles and needs (see Strand 2, Module K). In this scenario, a multitude of mechanisms might be in place to support the learner whilst they attend college: automated registration and payment for learning programmes; face-to-face or computer-based sessions; access to electronic resources ranging from simple materials to multimedia content; electronic methods of communication that might be -based or web-based; and automatic assessment and tracking systems that are tied to the college management information system, and hence tied to funding. E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

12 anytime Differentiated Differentiated pathway pace Anytime Blended
learning Anytime learning Traditional teaching tool Enabling learners to access some or all elements of their learning at any time that computers are available. Supporting learning The ability to offer differentiated pace in learning, and differentiated pathways to learning, is tied to our final situation: an environment that provides all the mechanisms of delivery and support mentioned so far, but which doesn’t necessarily require the learner to set foot in a college at all. The Martini concept of ‘anytime, anywhere’ is still with us as an ideal. Some colleges are further down this path than others, with most colleges offering a combination of programmes: learning that consists totally of traditional, direct face-to-face delivery and support learning that is a mixture of face-to-face and on-line delivery and support learning that is delivered and supported entirely on line. E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

13 remote Differentiated Differentiated pathway pace Anytime Blended
learning Anytime learning Traditional teaching tool Remote learning: anytime, anywhere Supporting learning To provide a truly comprehensive learning environment that can offer learning at any time and in any place, facilities have to be made available to learners and staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week (24/7). This doesn’t mean that practitioners and learners will have to work 24/7 - although this is the fear of some staff - only that elements of learning must be accessible when the college is shut. The only way to guarantee access to learning at any and all times is to enable access when college premises are closed. This demands remote access and would typically be supported by on-line peer and staff communication. E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

14 summary Traditional teaching tool Blended learning Remote learning: anytime, anywhere Supporting Differentiated pathway Anytime pace When it comes down to it - becoming more learner-centred means selecting, mixing and matching the most appropriate delivery and support to meet the learner’s needs at a given time and in a given situation. If this requires new creative and innovative approaches to teaching and learning, then to ignore technology as a tool would be both sad and a waste of a marvellous opportunity. It’s about selecting the most appropriate opportunity for the learner at a given time E-learning fan Scribbins & Powell

15 Some Scenarios Some Scenarios

16 good practice 1 Practitioner A Could ……
Make electronic copies of paper based materials available on the college intranet or VLE. - essay has good teaching skills but weak IT skills……. relies on face-to-face group work, role play and delivery of ideas through scenarios in paper-based activities Learn how to create interactive materials using simple applications such as Word or PowerPoint - motherboard – kew gdns Use on-line resources such as Websites or NLN materials pepes piza The learners are familiar with using a digital camera and the tutor is therefore able to set an assignment which involves the learners taking photographs of the college identifying potential health and safety risks. The learners then have to use these photographs, with their reasoning, in their assignments. A selection of the images is then placed on the college intranet or network so that those learners who were not present in the lesson are able to use those images to complete their assignments. ILT enables access to learning from outside the classroom and indeed outside the college. Work-based learners, for example, would find their learning experience enhanced if they were able to access supporting materials outside college. ILT allows learning to take place when and where required – that is, ILT offers flexible ways of delivery. Organise facilities for learners to create feedback electronically using PowerPoint, digital images, video & audio recordings, brainstorming

17 good practice 2 Practitioner B Could …..…
Use on-line resources such as Websites or NLN materials - dressing right has good IT skills and good subject knowledge ….. delivery does not actively engage learners, as it is too dependent on paper-based handouts and OHTs Use PowerPoint with animation, images and diagrams to highlight key points instead of traditional OHPs - cement example Create web quests to encourage discovery based learning prepare quizzes with the “castle toolkit” or “hot potatoes” to allow learners to test their own progress One of the easiest ways to get started with ILT is to take existing paper- based resources and convert these to ILT activities. For example, if you have paper-based assignments, quizzes or Overhead transparencies (OHT) diagrams, you could convert these into ILT activities. The question you will ask is ‘How?’ One example of how ILT enables paper-based activities to be transformed into interactive resources is to insert drop-down form fields in a Word document. This converts an inactive resource into an activity that learners can engage with. See how Joseph Kingsley-Nyinah of Kensington and Chelsea College created an interactive worksheet which he used with a group of English as a Second Language (ESOL) learners (http://ferl.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?page=13&resID=2248). 'It was a good reinforcement of what students are learning in the classroom' and, 'It was interesting to see students fascinated by pictures and text they could control and learn at their own pace' were some of the comments from the tutors delivering this activity. A powerful use of ILT is for reinforcement and revision. Converting paper-based quizzes into interactive on-line quizzes which learners can access independently or as part of a lesson is particularly effective. Use an interactive whiteboard with cordless mouse and keyboard to engage learners whiteboard

18 good practice 3 Practitioner C has good IT skills ….. Could …..…
place learning material on a VLE and provide on-line tutor support has good IT skills ….. Delivers face to face to small groups of learners on different sites repeats the same material with each group time saved can be used to address individual learners’ needs in the face-to-face sessions Use on-line resources such as Websites or NLN materials The scenario of Practitioner C is one that is common to tutors working in a college with multiple sites. Some colleges are therefore considering different approaches to supporting learners in these circumstances. ILT offers one such approach, whereby using the technology results in a saving of time and effort for the tutor but also enhances the learning experience of the group. The tutor is then able to use the face-to-face sessions to address specific areas where the learners require additional support. VLEs offer the facility of discussion boards or bulletin boards. This is a tool that the tutor could use to encourage discussion between two groups of learners on different sites. If you do not have access to a VLE in your organisation, you could use to facilitate a discussion. The learners’ experience is enhanced as they are also developing their communication skills. prepare electronic quizzes to allow learners to test their own progress and get feedback… Create web quests to encourage discovery based learning which can be shared between groups - toursim

19 Practitioner D Good practice 4 has basic IT skills ……
Could …..… Use on-line resources such as Websites or NLN materials & Games - example has basic IT skills …… Delivers face to face to small groups of learners with special needs. Create interactive materials using simple applications such as Word or PowerPoint incorporating images – example 1 example 2 Use digital videos and stills cameras to capture activities and create projects Learn what assistive technologies are available and learn how to use them - techdis Use an interactive whiteboard with cordless mouse and keyboard to engage learners

20 How Can Technology Empower
Empowering learning How Can Technology Empower The Learner ? How Technology Empowers Learning The use of technology empowers learning, extending opportunities and enabling learning to take place in ways that suit the needs of individual learners. Furthermore, using technology as part of everyday culture is a skill many learners bring with them into their formal learning. Skills for e-living can inform and broaden the skills used in e-learning and should be seen as an essential part of the 21st century learner's toolkit. The model in the next section, starts from 'traditional teaching tool' on the left and illustrates how e-learning can support teaching, training and learning in a formal managed learning context. The degree of learner autonomy increases as you move to the right, increasing reliance upon the resources to work effectively without external support. The lower semi-circle illustrates how activities undertaken autonomously by learners can support and underpin their learning in any formal managed learning environment and could be utilised to good effect in the delivery of teaching, training and learning in a formal context. The degree of learner autonomy decreases from the right to the left as the use of technology by individuals engaged in their own self-directed activities becomes more closely channelled into particular directions. It should not be assumed that any segment or half of the model represents better methods or modes of learning, or that learning only takes place in the upper part of the circle. The many forms of e-learning should rather be seen as a set of opportunities to meet the differing needs of individual learners in different contexts. Each segment of the circular model of e-living and e-learning lends itself to high quality, effective learning when it is appropriate to the needs of the learner and the context in which the learning takes place. Click the link to view video

21       This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.


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