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In Educational Contexts. Scenario should we address disruptive technologies?

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Presentation on theme: "In Educational Contexts. Scenario should we address disruptive technologies?"— Presentation transcript:

1 In Educational Contexts

2 Scenario

3 should we address disruptive technologies?

4 Realities

5 Learning & Split Attention The Problem

6 Technology is a Force for when it: Increases Productivity Increases Access Connects Us Helps Us to Create Makes Our Lives Easier Good the

7 Disruption is technologys Dark Side

8 Phonetic Pathway Visual Pathway

9 Phonetic Pathway Visual Pathway Looking at a PowerPoint Looking at a laptop screen

10 Listening to Lecture Listening to Phone Ring Phonetic Pathway

11 Multi-Tasking Distractions Ring

12 Un-intentional & Intermittent Disruptions Ring

13 Study by Jill T. Shelton, et al. (2009)

14 Exam ExperimentalControl Study by Jill T. Shelton, et al. (2009)

15 (Shelton, J.T. et al., 2009) Experimental Question Control Question

16 Visual and auditory disruptions decrease retention and comprehension of material Distractions Ring

17 Intentional & Extended Disruption

18 Open Laptop Group Closed Laptop Group Two Groups (Hembrooke and Gay, 2003)

19 Quiz (Hembrooke and Gay, 2003)

20

21 BrowsersSeekers Laptop Open Users Divided Into 2 Groups (Hembrooke and Gay, 2003)

22 Quick UseExtended Use BrowsersSeekers

23 (Hembrooke and Gay, 2003)

24 Multi-taskers learn less flexibly (Foerde, et al., 2006). Habit Declarative Multi-taskers Single-taskers

25 Heavy Media Multi-taskers exhibit reduced cognitive control Difficulty filtering out irrelevant stimuli Less effective task switchers (Ophir, et. al.,2009)

26 Multi-Tasking Less Accurate Learned less flexibly Worse at multi-tasking

27 The split attention caused by multi-tasking and momentary distractions like cellphone rings… Significantly reduces retention Results in less flexible use of retained information Distractions Multi-Tasking

28 should we address disruptive technologies? Because it diminishes the effectiveness of instruction

29 will I address disruptive technologies? 1.Inform You of Effects 2.Communicate Expectations 3.Address Disruptions

30 Inform You of Effects Communicate Expectations Address Disruptions

31 Silence or turn off electronic devices during class and put them away during class. Cell phones are prohibited in class rooms according to GPC Policy 206.GPC Policy 206 Be considerate of others and avoid distracting yourself and others with technology. If there is an emergency or urgent situation and you may need to respond to a call, inform the instructor, sit near the door, and discreetly and quickly exit before responding to the call. Students that continue to disrupt class will be asked to leave according to GPC Policy 113.GPC Policy 113 Delete Me (click on shape and press Delete) This version of ground rules is for instructors that want to eliminate the use of technology in the classroom.

32 Silence or turn off electronic devices during class Be considerate of others and avoid distracting yourself and others with technology. It is your choice whether you multi-task during class. If multi-tasking distracts others or appears to adversely affect your performance, you will be asked not to use the electronic device during class. If there is an emergency or urgent situation and you may need to respond to a call, inform the instructor, sit near the door, and discreetly and quickly exit before responding to the call. Students that continue to disrupt class will be asked to leave according to GPC Policy 113.GPC Policy 113 Delete Me (click on shape and press Delete) This version of ground rules is for instructors that will allow technology tools, but may ask individual students to discontinue use if it affects their performance

33 Silence or turn off electronic devices during class Be considerate of others and avoid distracting yourself and others with technology. It is your choice whether you multi-task during class. However, you are responsible for material taught, and the instructor will not repeat or review information missed due to multi-tasking. If there is an emergency or urgent situation and you may need to respond to a call, inform the instructor, sit near the door, and discreetly and quickly exit before responding to the call. Students that continue to disrupt class will be asked to leave according to GPC Policy 113GPC Policy 113 Delete Me (click on shape and press Delete) This version of ground rules is for instructors that will allow technology tools and will not address disruptive use if it only affects the individual making the choice to use it

34 Educate You of Effects Communicate Expectations Address Disruptions

35 You are allowed to choose whether to multi- task or to allow disruptive notifications as long as it doesnt disrupt other members of the class. If your choice dramatically affects your performance you will be asked to discontinue use of the problematic technology. Delete Me (click on shape and press Delete) This slide is for faculty that may ask a student to discontinue use of technology if it affects their individual performance

36 If a disruption affects more than one individual… Instruction will be paused (until the disruption has ended) The class will re-group by reviewing what was being discussed just before the disruption

37 Educate You of Effects Communicate Expectations Address Disruptions

38 Created by the OIT – Instructional Technology Services Heidi Beezley, Instructional Technologist August 2011 You are free to share and remix this work as long as your use is noncommercial, provides attribution, and share alike any derivative work

39 Benbennick, David. A left human ear. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ear.jpg. Web. 7 June 2011. (CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ear.jpg Enright, Andrew. Laptop – Closed.jpg. 2005. http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewcoulterenright/62884682/ Fri. 10 June 2011 (Attribution- NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic) http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewcoulterenright/62884682/ Euskalanto. Human Brain.jpg. 2004. http://www.flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971826491/. Web. 31 May 2011. (CC Attribution-NonCommercial Share Alike 2.0 Generic) Euskalanto. Human brain, medial view.jpg. 2004. http://www.flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971827663/. Web. Fri. 10 June 2011 (CC Attribution-NonCommercial Share Alike 2.0 Generic) http://www.flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971827663/ Euskalanto. Human brain, lateral view.jpg. 2004. http://www.flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971828859/in/photostream/. Web. Fri. 10 June 2011 (CC Attribution-NonCommercial Share Alike 2.0 Generic) http://www.flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971828859/in/photostream/ Felix 42 contra la censura. Armless Zombies? 2007. http://www.flickr.com/photos/felix42/453311029/. Web. Wed. 10 Aug 2011 (CC Attribution- NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic) http://www.flickr.com/photos/felix42/453311029/ NASA. A Swarm of Ancient Stars. http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/IMAGES/SMALL/GPN-2000-000930.jpg/. Web. 31 May 2011.http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/IMAGES/SMALL/GPN-2000-000930.jpg/ Ryantron. Caffeinating, calculating, computerating.jpg. 2010. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryantron/4453018910/ Web. 13 June 2011. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryantron/4453018910/

40 Bugeja, M. (2007). Distractions in the Wireless Classroom. Chronicle of Higher Education, 53(21), C1-C4. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. http://proxygsu- dek1.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN =23897140&site=ehost-livehttp://proxygsu- dek1.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN =23897140&site=ehost-live Bugeja, M. (2008). The Age of Distraction: The Professor or the Processor?. Futurist, 42(1), 68-66. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Cole, S., & Kosc, G. (2010). Quit Surfing and Start "Clicking": One Professor's Effort to Combat the Problems of Teaching the U.S. Survey in a Large Lecture Hall. History Teacher, 43(3), 397-410. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Fink III, J. L. (2010). Why We Banned Use of Laptops and "Scribe Notes" in Our Classroom. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 74(6), 1-2. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Foerde, K., Knowlton, B. J., & Poldrack, R. A. (2006). Modulation of competing memory systems by distraction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(31), 11778-11783. doi:10.1073/pnas.0602659103 Glenn, D. (2010). Divided Attention. Chronicle of Higher Education, 56(21), B6-B8. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. http://proxygsu- dek1.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN =48278407&site=ehost-livehttp://proxygsu- dek1.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN =48278407&site=ehost-live Hembrooke, H. & Gay, Geri. (2003). The Laptop and the Lecture: The Effects of Multitasking in Learning Environments. Journal of Computing in Higher Education. 15(1), ?-?. Jill T. Shelton et al., The distracting effects of a ringing cell phone: An investigation of the laboratory and..., Journal of Environmental Psychology (2009), doi:10.1016/j.jenvp.2009.03.001

41 Makany, T., Kemp, J., & Dror, I. E. (2009). Optimising the use of note-taking as an external cognitive aid for increasing learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 40(4), 619-635. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8535.2008.00906.x Markel, G. (2009). HOW LEARNING PROFESSIONALS CAN Keep Technology Distractions at Bay. T+D, 63(9), 68-69. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Murray, K. E. (2011). LET THEM USE LAPTOPS: DEBUNKING THE ASSUMPTIONS UNDERLYING THE DEBATE OVER LAPTOPS IN THE CLASSROOM. Oklahoma City University Law Review, 185- 229. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Ophir, E., Nass, C., & Wagner, A. D. (2009). Cognitive control in media multitaskers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106(37), 15583-15587. doi:10.1073/pnas.0903620106 Paridon, H. M., & Kaufmann, M. (2010). Multitasking in work-related situations and its relevance for occupational health and safety: Effects on performance, subjective strain and physiological parameters. Europe's Journal of Psychology, 110-124. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Stephens, B. R. (2005). Laptops in psychology: Conducting flexible in-class research and writing laboratories. New directions for teaching and learning, 2005(101), 15-26. Waitskin, J. (n.d.). Distractions and Multitasking Virus in Our Classrooms. Building healthy relationships and letting go of unhealthy relationships. Retrieved June 1, 2011, from http://www.support4change.com/general/books/excerpt/distracted.html http://www.support4change.com/general/books/excerpt/distracted.html Young, J. R. (2006). The Fight for Classroom Attention: Professor vs. Laptop. Chronicle of Higher Education, 52(39), A27-A29. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. http://proxygsu- dek1.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN =21116420&site=ehost-livehttp://proxygsu- dek1.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN =21116420&site=ehost-live


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