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Overview of Student Intern Expectations WSU Student Intern Meeting: December 8, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Overview of Student Intern Expectations WSU Student Intern Meeting: December 8, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Overview of Student Intern Expectations WSU Student Intern Meeting: December 8, 2011

2 Student Intern Guidelines Communicate with cooperating teacher and university supervisor routinely Adhere to all placement school policies Demonstrate academic and professional integrity Complete all assignments/ projects

3 Absences: Notify CT, US, building principal, and school contact person Limit absences to emergency situations ONLY Extended absences – documentation needed (field experience extensions given if necessary) Lesson plans must be provided

4 Demonstrate sensitivity to students needs Demonstrate responsiveness to feedback Transport oneself to and from placement school Maintain confidentiality all school records Remain cautious of social networks May not be hired to begin full-time teaching until last day of WSU semester May not act as a substitute teacher May not transport children at any time

5 Be the TEACHER

6 Lesson Planning By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail. Benjamin Franklin

7 Importance of Planning and Preparation Documentation – Evidence of content – Evidence of content pedagogy – Knowledge of students and contextual information Quality is critical Continuance is essential Depth will foster successfulness – Cooperating teachers – see Box 2.1 on page 17 of Maximum Mentoring for ways you can help

8 WSU Expectations of Planning What is expected in terms of lesson planning? – For all formal observations, each teacher candidate must use the WSU format with standards written out See handbook for template Other lessons should include Essential Elements 8-10 formal lesson plans: cooperating teacher; 5-6 formal lessons: university supervisor (WSU template) Attached copy of lesson to the formal observation form CT needs to see a lesson plan prior to teaching- timeframe should be an individual discussion

9 NameGradeSchool Title of LessonDateContent Area(s) Student Standards (list by numbers here, attach full written) Content Objective(s) Language Objective(s) Key VocabularyTeacher Materials Engaging the Learner Focus (ELF):What will explain to students as to why they should learn this? Instructional Sequence- Closure to lesson? How will you know they learned (assessment)? Instruction includes: __Adaptations? differentiating for diverse needs __Blooms: highest level_________ __Problem solving/inquiry included? __Parental involvement needed? __Safety issues addressed? __ State Assessment Indicators: Adaptations for Differentiating Reflection (What comes next? What will you do different? What worked best?) Wichita State University Elementary Education Lesson Plan

10 Essential Elements of Planning (1) What do you want the students to learn? – Standards must be there – use Common Core Standards if possible – Follow USD #259 pacing guide (2) How are you going to deliver it and differentiate for your students needs? – Consider the contextual factors – What instructional strategies will you use? (3) How will you know they got it? (assessment)

11 Highly Effective Teachers They know how to design lessons to help students reach mastery. (Wong, 2005) – Depth and alignment on non-observed plans Page 27 IS NOT a lesson plan Moderation: TLW recognize the essential elements of expectations for writing lesson plans. Standard: NCTQ 2 The program requires teacher candidates to design and adjust instruction to enhance the academic performance of all students. Using visual and written examples with shoulder partner review. Assess by the lesson plan rubric score of 3 or more

12 Suggested Procedures Organization – Reference CTs model and his/her expectation of when he or she wants to review them. – US expectations-ask them – Resources, check out pages MM – Daily routines pg. 77 MM – Long range semester plan for teaching handbook pg

13 Suggested Procedures Use your time well Recognize that ALL planning and preparing cannot be completed between 8:50 a.m. and 4:20 p.m. for a novice teacher Communicate – Ask questions; seek help; research and know curriculum resources Be a professional – Planning and preparing is what effective teachers do before they teach

14 Closure What are three essential things in ALL lessons? You and your CT tell each other: – Standards – Instructional strategies being used – Ways to assess the learning that occurred Why Bother? The Big Three: Preparation, Preparation, Preparation! LouAnne Johnson, teacher & author of the book that inspired: Dangerous Minds

15 References Danielson, C. (2009). Enhancing professionalism: A framework for teaching. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Rudney, G. L., & Guillaume, A. M. (2003). Maximum mentoring: An action guide for teacher trainers and cooperating teachers. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc. Wong, H. K., & Wong, R. T. (2005). How to be a an effective teacher: The first days of school. Mountain View, CA: Harry K. Wong Publications.

16 Examples of Co-Teaching – interns/cooperating teachers

17 Name Keely Hazelton Grade 4 th School Woodman Title of Lesson Roadrunners: Surprising birds Vocabulary and Authors Purpose Date Content Area(s) Language Arts Student Standards Standard 1-Reading: The student reads and comprehends text across the curriculum. Benchmark 4: The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive). Indicator 9: Identifies the authors purpose (to persuade, to entertain, to inform) Content Objective(s): TSW be able to correctly identify what the authors purpose is in the story Roadrunners: Surprising Birds and show reasoning as to why they think it is that. *Language Objective(s): TSW repeat the vocabulary words and definitions as well as read aloud when instructed to. Students will communicate with partners about what they believe the authors purpose is. Key vocabulary Authors purpose: Why the author wrote the passage Awkward: Moving without grace and ease Proclaimed: Speaking about something loudly and publicly Agile: Moving quickly and easily Guardian: Someone who watches over or protects people and things Tottered: Moved unsteadily back and forth Interfere: Stopping something or getting in the way Student and Teacher Materials Teacher: Treasures Unit 3 book Roadrunners: Surprising Birds Student Checklist Vocabulary word cards with definitions Matching vocab cards for matching activity Students: Star Notebooks containing Authors purpose worksheets Pencil Engaging the Learner Focus: Today, we are going to be reading a short story, but to prepare for it, we need to learn a few new words. I am going to show you ONE of the words with my actions… So, first, here is the list of the words. Now, watch me (dramatize tottered). What actions did you so that gave you a clue as to what I was doing? How did you know? Great, tottered means to be unsteady and wobbly. We have a few more words to go over… see if you recognize these words… What will explain to students as to why they should learn this? Students will be reading all kinds of writings throughout their lives. It is important for them to be aware of what type of writing they are reading. This will help them identify if the writing in question is factual or entertaining. They will also need to be able to discern anothers perspective and this skill builds to that understanding. Instructional Sequence 1.***Rotations last 30 minutes. Two 15 minute rotations, 1 with computers and 1 phonics lesson with CT at back table. 15 minutes for computer rotation and CT rotation, 30 minutes for main lesson*** 2.ELF (See above) 3.First we are going to introduce our vocabulary words for the week. 4.Using the I do we do model, read the vocabulary word and have the students repeat the word back to you. Explain the definition to the students and have them repeat the definition back to you. (Vocabulary) 5.Now that you have some recognition of our vocabulary words, lets play a matching game with our new vocabulary words. Each of you will get a card and it is your job to find your match. There are 6 vocabulary words and 6 definitions. Each of you will get either a definition or vocabulary word. It is your job to match your card to the definition or word. (If there are less than 12 people in the group then the teacher will be given a card) To be Addressed in the Instruction: _x_Adaptations, differentiating for diverse needs __Application of learning _x_Assessment of learning _x_Blooms: highest level Knowledge _x_Checking for understanding _x_Correct content __Critical thinking _x_Closure _x_Meaningful-purpose of learning __Problem solving __Parental involvement _x_Reading _x_Social interactions __Safety issues x_Vocabulary (tottered, awk ward, agile, proclaimed, guardian, interfered, authors purpose) Wichita State University Elementary Education Lesson Plan Date_________

18 Name Dyan Morland Grade 2 nd School: Chisholm Trail Elementary Methods Instructor: Gayla Lohfink Title of Lesson Cause & Effect – Unit 3 Week 1 Comprehension If You Give a Mouse a Cookie Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Date 11/10/11 Content Area(s) Reading (Comprehension: Cause & Effect) Student Standards (list by numbers here, attach full written) Ks. St. 2 nd grade Reading Standard 1: The student reads and comprehends text across curriculum. Benchmark 4: The student comprehends a variety of texts (narrative, expository, technical, and persuasive) Indicator 2: The student identifies cause-effect relationships in narrative and expository texts. Content Objective(s) *Given various tasks, TSW correctly identify and visually represent the cause and effect relationships of four or more narrative texts. Language Objective(s) TSW listen to cause and effect statements and will write on wipe off boards to identify causes from effects. TSW listen to narrative text, discuss events of the story with peers, and write/record cause and effect relationships using graphic organizers TSW use sorting cards and maps to read cause and effect relationships to themselves, identify causes and effects, and place them in appropriate categories. Key Vocabulary Cause- The reason why something happens Effect- Something that happens in real life or a story Teacher Materials Students: dry erase board, markers, erasers real-life cause & effect examples (from quiz, quiz, trade cards) If You Give a Mouse a Cookie Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day graphic organizers-15 copies each (A & B) sorting cards-15 copies each (A & B) 30 sorting mats (cause & effect) student pencils, scissors, glue Engaging the Learner Focus (ELF): This week weve been learning about cause and effect relationships. Why is it important to learn about causes and effects? Have you ever wondered why you couldnt go outside and play when it was raining? The effect was staying inside because the cause was the rain! Causes and effects are all around us in real life and in many of the stories that we read. Cause and effect skills can help us determine the relationship between things that happen and why things happen. When we understand cause and effect, we better understand events in stories and in our lives. Lets listen to some real-life examples of cause and effect and see if we can figure out what happens the effect and why it happens, the cause. Listen very carefully to the examples that I read. I will read both the cause and the effect. Then Ill read one of the statements again. If you think what I say is a cause, write a C on your dry erase board. If you think what I say is the effect, write an E on your dry erase board. 1, 2, 3, show me! Now, Ill read a statement and you can help me think of a cause or an effect to go along with it. Ready? (Ex: I decide to bake some cookies, but I forget to set a timer and leave them in the oven…what is my effect? What caused this to happen?) In what way(s) will students understand the purpose and relevancy of the lesson? What will you say to them? Have you ever wondered why you couldnt go outside and play when it was raining? The effect was staying inside because the cause was the rain! Causes and effects are all around us in real life and in many of the stories that we read. Cause and effect skills can help us determine the relationship between things that happen and why things happen. When we understand cause and effect, we better understand events in stories and in our lives. Instructional Sequence- 1. (T) I need active listening so I can tell you what today will look like. In just a little we will split you into two groups. One group will be with Mrs. Rock and one group will be with me. Both groups will be reading a story together and listening for examples of cause and effect in our story. Well be keeping track of the causes and effects in our story using a graphic organizer that looks like this. If you hear a cause in the story, well write it here (point to corresponding box on paper). If you hear an effect in the story, well write it here (point to corresponding box on paper). Well talk about this a little bit more when we are in our groups. After we finish our stories, well come back to our seats and play a game so that we can practice all that weve learned about cause and effect. While we are walking to our groups our voices are at a 0 and our hands our to ourselves. While we are in our groups, our eyes are watching the instructor and the story, ears are listening for causes and effects, and hands are kept to ourselves. Voices are at a 0 while we are listening to the story. If you are helping read the story, our voice can be a level 2 so that we dont interrupt the other group. We will know we are successful when we have read our stories and identified some cause and effects. Are you ready to hear which group you will go to? Great! Please listen carefully to your group because we will not switch groups today. If you hear your name please stand with your voice at a 0. (T) Read names (Mrs. Rocks group) On Level/Below Level: If you are standing and you are a girl, please take your pencil and a board to write on and quietly travel to the smart board carpet. Ok, now boys in Mrs. Rocks group may move to the carpet. Thank for moving so quietly! My group, (On Level/Above Level): Please show me what your best looks like. Please stand with voices at a 0. Boys, please bring a pencil and a board to write on and find a quiet seat on the map rug. Thank you. Girls, please join us. Parallel Direct Instruction (Differentiated Groups w/ Mrs. Rock & Ms. Morland) (Both Groups will do the following) 1. Quickly review the meaning of a cause and an effect. Remind me what an effect would be? Good! An effect is something that happens in the story. Ok, what would a cause be? Yes, the cause is why the effect happens! The effect happens because of the cause! 2. (Teacher think aloud) Boys and girls, the graphic organizer is going to help us with organizing whether we hear causes or effects in the story. We will be using it as we read. It looks like this. (Hold up graphic organizer) When I listen to the story and hear an effect, or something that happens in the story, I will write it in this box (point to effect box). When I hear the cause, or the reason why something happened in the story, I will write it in this box (point to cause box). Some of our boxes already give us effects that happen in the story and we will need to listen for the cause. Just think to yourself, The effect happened because of the cause. The word because is a keyword that can help us find causes in the story. If you see or hear the word because in a story, it might help you discover the cause. Some of our boxes give us the cause and we will need to listen for what happened in the story because of this cause. If you find a cause in the story first and then need to discover the effect, you can use the keyword so to help you. For example, just ask yourself, I know this happened so the effect is this. The word so is a keyword that can help us find effects in the story. If you see or hear the word so in a story, it might help you discover the effect. Finally, some boxes on our graphic organizer are empty so we can write our very own cause and effect from the story! (On Level/Below Level) Mrs. Rocks Group 3. Teacher Read aloud If You Give a Mouse a Cookie (I do, we do, you do: filling out graphic organizer A for cause & effect while reading) 4. Guided & Independent Practice (I do, we do, you do with graphic organizer A) Discuss cause and effects of the story while reading. Use I do, we do, you do. Teacher think aloud for the first cause and effect. I remember that the boy in the story gave the mouse a cookie so then the effect was that the mouse wanted some milk. Or, if I read that the mouse wanted some milk in the story first, then I can look back in the story to see that this happened because the boy gave the mouse a cookie! This tells me that the boy giving the mouse a cookie is a cause and the mouse wanting milk is the effect. Did you notice that I said the words so and because? These are CLUE WORDS we can look and listen for when we are trying to find causes and effects. It is kind of like a light that goes off in our story that says look at me. I am important. If I wanted to write this cause and effect on my organizer it would look like this. (model filling in the first boxes of the organizer for students). Lets look at our next box and read it together. It already gives us some information on the cause and effect. Read aloud together. Lets listen in our story for the cause/effect that goes with this box. Stop after reading the cause/effect that might go in the box. Have students turn to a shoulder partner and discuss what they think the answer is. Why do they think this is the answer? Call on quiet, raised hands to have student groups share out their ideas and reasoning. Use discussion to fill in the next cause/effe(ct box together. Read the cause and effect aloud together and say the effect happened because of the cause. Fill out remaining boxes while reading the story. Have students fill in their own cause and effect relationship for the final, empty boxes. Have students share the cause and effect relationships they used in the final boxes. 5. (T) Collect cause and effect organizers to be used to check for understanding/assessment (formative assessment) (On Level/Above Level) Ms. Morlands Group 3. Teacher Read aloud Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (verbal I do, we do, you do: filling out graphic organizer B for cause & effect while reading) 4. Guided & Independent Practice (verbal I do, we do, you do) Discuss cause and effects of the story while reading. Use a verbal I do, then complete a we do, finally asking students to complete an independent you do with graphic organizer B. Teacher think aloud for the first cause and effect. Im thinking that the boy went to sleep with gum in his mouth, so the effect it had is that he woke up with gum in his hair. Or, if I read that the boy woke up with gum in his hair first, then I can look back in the story to see that this happened because the boy went to sleep with gum in his mouth. This tells me that the boy going to sleep with gum in his hair is the cause and the boy waking up with gum in his hair is the effect. Did you notice that I said the words so and because? These are CLUE WORDS we can look and listen for when we are trying to find causes and effects. It is kind of like a light that goes off in our story that says look at me. I am important. Since I found a cause and effect in my story I need to record it (fill in appropriate boxes on graphic organizer). Continue to read the story aloud while students listen for more examples of cause and effect. Stop on the carsick page. Show the pictures of these pages to students and ask them to turn to a shoulder partner to discuss the cause and effect. Call on quiet, raised hands to have student groups share out their ideas. Fill in the next set of cause and effect boxes together. Next, stop on dentist page, crying page, and shoe page. Have students listen for the cause and effects on these pages and fill in the remaining boxes on their graphic organizer. 5. (T) Collect cause and effect organizers to be used to check for understanding/assessment (formative assessment). Closure to lesson? (T) Explain that now we will use our knowledge about cause and effect to sort causes from effects at our desks. Each person will receive a mat and cards that they will need to cut out, sort, and glue. Each card will have either a cause or an effect. 6. Independent Practice/Assessment *(sorting cards differentiated by leveled groups: Mrs. Rocks Group- sorting cards A with statements and pictures Ms. Morland Group- sorting cards B with statements only Model for students how to sort cards by reading their statements or looking at pictures to decide which cards go together and which cards are a cause or an effect. Choose a few statements to read together with students. Discuss that statements have the same topics and go together. Read statements aloud to determine the cause and the effect. Model for students how to place cards on mats so that they correspond to appropriate topics and cause/effect categories. Remind students to ask themselves why something happened to figure out this cause. Tell students to think to themselves, This happened because… The keyword because will help students find the cause to an effect. Remember the cause happens first! Or, students can use the keyword so. This keyword helps us find the effect, the events that occur after the cause. Tell students to think to themselves, This happened so what comes next? If these keywords are found in the text they will be like a light going off that says the text is important and may contain the cause and effect. Or, remind students they can always use the words so and because while reading parts of texts out loud. Tell students to say the words so and because out loud today while reading and sorting statements. This will help students sort the causes from the effects. Remind students that while working at their seats they may work with a level 0 or 1 voice if they need to read the causes and effects to themselves. Remind students that we want them to practice what they know about cause and effect so it is important that they do their own work. If they have any questions or think theyve matched all the cards, they can raise a quiet hand before gluing cause and effect cards to their sorting mat. Ask students what questions they have. Pass out a sorting mat and a set of cause/effect cards to each student. Dismiss girls and then boys back to their seats, walking with a level 0 voice. 7. (T) Collect finished sorting mats to be used for summative assessment. Voice check and prepare for next reading core lesson. How will you know what they learned (assessment)? Formative Assessment: Observe student show me answers on wipe boards identifying causes and effects and record student names who struggle with specific cause/effect identification. Collect graphic organizers and check for student understanding of cause and effect relationships. Summative Assessment: Collect sorting mats. Assess tudents on correct identification of at least four cause and effect examples and relationships derived from given statements. Instruction includes: _X_ Differentiation for diverse needs? _X_ Higher level thinking (Bloom): -highest level Analysis _X_ Problem solving/inquiry? __ Parental involvement? _X_ Safety issues addressed as needed? _X_ State Assessment Indicators: Ks. St. 2 nd grade Reading Differentiation Tools/Strategies (list tools or strategies for scaffolding, modifying, and/or extending instruction) Mrs. Rocks Group (Cheyenne, Gage, Alaura, Livia, Connor, Effrem, Jadin J., Trinity, Peyton, Angela, Malakai, Tiera, Trevor) (Below and On Level Readers) Modeling for students- I Do, We Do, You Do graphic organizer A- scaffolded practice with cause and effect relationships Sorting Cards A- statements and pictures (dual-coding) for reading support with cause & effect Level-appropriate story Ms. Morlands Group (Dalyn, Jaden C., Alex, Averie, Onnika, Sophie, Jameer, Amery, Marecia, Laisa, Toby, Peyton, Bradlynn, R.J., Gavin) (Above and On Level Readers) Modeling for students- verbal I Do with practiced We Do and You Do increased independent practice level- appropriate story (increased difficulty) graphic organizer B- scaffolded practice with cause and effect relationships, increased content amount and difficulty Sorting Cards B- statements only with increased difficulty of vocabulary and amount of text Reflection (What comes next? What would you do differently? What worked best?)


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