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Addressing Academic Avoidance at Tier II My thanks to: Cynthia M. Anderson, PhD, BCBA-D University of Oregon Presented by Lea Brown, KY PBIS Network.

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Presentation on theme: "Addressing Academic Avoidance at Tier II My thanks to: Cynthia M. Anderson, PhD, BCBA-D University of Oregon Presented by Lea Brown, KY PBIS Network."— Presentation transcript:

1 Addressing Academic Avoidance at Tier II My thanks to: Cynthia M. Anderson, PhD, BCBA-D University of Oregon Presented by Lea Brown, KY PBIS Network

2 Agenda Point card interventionsrationale and background Point cards within a multi-tiered system Tier II interventionsenhancing systems for positive and durable outcomes CICOa foundation for Tier II interventions Breaks are Better Academic Behavior CICO

3 Point Card Interventions in Schools Target behaviors operationally defined Assessment of student behavior – Pre-determined times – Numerical scale with defined values Contingencies for target behavior Home component Robust research base (e.g., Chafoulas et al., 2002, 2005; Dougherty & Dougherty, 1977; Fabiano et al., 2010; Schumaker et al., 1977)

4 Reliance on home contingencies Selection process inconsistent Individualized – Target responses – Evaluation metric and schedule – contingencies Traditional home-school notes may be difficult to scale up

5 5 Tier I Intervention for ALL students Effective: 80% or more meeting benchmarks 5

6 Tier I Intervention – Explicit instruction – Opportunities to practice in target settings – Feedback Systems – Defined and measurable outcomes – Student progress monitored – Team-based problem solving, coaching

7 Considerations Simply having Tier I doesnt guarantee – Teachers are implementing – All students have access At risk students need proactive behavior management Before implementing more intensive support, ask yourself… Is the Student Receiving an Adequate DOSE of the Universal Intervention? Is the Tier I intervention 1.Fully in place 2.Implemented with fidelity 3.Resulting in desired outcomes?

8 8 At least 80% of students are successful…what about the rest? 8

9 9 Tier III 9

10 10 Core + Supplemental Tier II 10

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12 Tier II Interventions Match needs of school Are implemented rapidly – Similar across students – Staff trained in intervention – Materials on hand Match problem – Intensity – Mechanism (skill, fluency, or contingency deficit Use data-based decision-making – Who will likely benefit? – Is the intervention working? – Next steps Enhance fidelity Tier II Assessm ent Tool Tier II Assessm ent Tool

13 CHECK-IN/CHECK-OUT: TIER II BEHAVIOR REPORT CARDS

14 Student Recommended for CICO CICO is Implemented CICO Coordinator summarizes data for decision making Bi-weekly coordination Meeting to assess student progress Parent feedback Regular teacher feedback Afternoon check-out Morning check-in

15 Empirical Support 10 studies to date Elementary school (7) & middle school (3) Decrease disruptive behavior & enhance academic engagement (e.g.,Campbell & Anderson, in press; Fairbanks et al., 2007; Hawken & Horner, 2003; Simonsen et al., 2010; Todd et al.,2008) CICO most effective for students emitting attention-maintained problem behavior (Campbell & Anderson, 2008; March & Horner, 2007; McIntosh et al., 2009)

16 ACADEMIC BEHAVIOR CICO J. Turtura

17 Academic Behavior CICO Shares several features with CICO – Morning and afternoon checks in and out – Daily point card is foundation – Similar across students receiving intervention – Data guide decision-making Modifications designed to – Increase structure and feedback around recording assignments – Provide specific feedback for academic-related expectations – Decrease likelihood of being set up for a bad day – Provide incentives for positive academic behavior

18 Components of ABC Morning check-in Daily feedback sessions Afternoon check-out Home session

19 Morning Check-in Student meets with coordinator/mentor Is student prepared? Are assignments complete? Review home note Provide point card & tracker 2 points possible

20 Daily Feedback Sessions Student keeps point card (or separate tracker and have student turn in to teacher) Student meets academic expectations Student completes assignment tracker Feedback at end of class period – Academic expectations – Homework recorded accurately 3 points per expectation & 1 point for tracker use

21 Afternoon Check-out Student meets with coordinator/mentor Review point card--% points earned – Provide incentives if using – Positive verbal feedback Review homework trackerplan for work completion Complete home note End with encouragement 2 points possible

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24 Activity Morning Check-inFeedbackHomework TrackerAfternoon Check-out Points Possible 2 Up to 3 per expectation 1 per feedback session2 How Points are Earned Student has materials (1) and work is complete (1) Meet behavioral and academic expectations Assignments recorded correctly Attend checkout (1) and have teacher(s) signature (1)

25 Morning Check-in Logistics Location Materials available – Minimum: pencils, paper, erasers, etc. – Consider individual items such as textbooks Homework completion – Complete nowget pass to be late to class – Complete laterreceive homework pass – 3 or more incompletes in 2-week period: consider new intervention

26 Home Component Parent workshop first!

27 Parent Workshop Approximately 20 min Overview of ABC Establishing a homework routine Planning for long-term projects Organizing for success

28 Home Component Parents do: – Review Assignments – Problem-solve homework completion/study plan – Complete home note Parents do not: – Complete work for child – Argue, use continued reminders – Offer additional incentives or negative consequences

29 BREAKS ARE BETTER Justin Boyd

30 Breaks are Better (BrB) Shares several features with CICO – Morning and afternoon checks in and out – Daily point card is foundation – Similar across students receiving intervention – Data guide decision-making Modifications designed to – Provide specific feedback for academic-related expectations – Decrease likelihood of being set up for a bad day – Provide incentives for positive academic behavior – Provide replacement skill to obtain brief break

31 Morning Check-in Student meets with coordinator/mentor Is student prepared? Review home note Provide point card, timer, & tracker 2 points possible

32 Daily Feedback Sessions Student keeps point card Student meets academic & social behavior expectations Student takes breaks when needed Feedback at end of class period – Meeting expectations – Taking breaks if needed 3 points per expectation & 1 point for tracker use

33 Afternoon Check-out Student meets with coordinator/mentor Review point card--% points earned – Provide incentives if using – Positive verbal feedback Complete home note Student turns in timer End with encouragement 2 points possible

34 BrB During Academic Routines Student engages in academic routines Student can request a break 2 min break Specific activities during break Student returns to work after break Breaks are Bettter

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37 Common Questions/Concerns Why should we allow breaks? Three breaks is too many!

38 Activity Morning Check-inFeedbackBreak TrackerAfternoon Check-out Points Possible 2 Up to 3 per expectation 1 per feedback session2 How Points are Earned Student attends check- in (1) and has materials (1) Meet behavioral and academic expectations Taking breaks appropriately if needed Attend checkout (1) and have teacher(s) ratings (1)

39 WORK TIME: PLANNING FOR IMPLEMENTATION

40 Implementation Planning Planning for ABC and BrB Developing daily progress report Progress monitoring Implementing ABC and BrB

41 Planning for Implementation Selecting coordinator(s) Modifying school-wide expectations

42 Intervention Coordinator Roles and responsibilities – Ensure materials are available – Maintain staff buy-in – Train teachers, students – Inform parents – Monitor outcomes – Problem-solve Key characteristics – Fluent with ABC or BrB – Respected by adults and students – Time and skills to make things happen

43 Coordinator options One coordinator for whole school (CICO, BrB, ABC) One coordinator for each intervention Multiple roles per or across interventions – One person monitors data and trains across intervention(s) – One or more individuals perform check in and out – One or more individuals enter data*

44 Liberty Elementary School300 students, 18 on CICO, 14 on BrB Organize Materials Train staff, student, families Graph data Oversee progress monitoring Check students in and out Counselor Counselor ddddddddd Counselor Counselor ddddddddd Counselor

45 Oceanside Middle520 students 28 on CICO, 24 on ABC Organize Materials ccccddddd Train staff, student, families Graph data Oversee progress monitoring Check students in and out – Program graduate/parent volunteer Counselor dddddbbbbbddd IA Counselor/IPBS team Counselor ( 12 ABC, 5 advanced CICO ) Librarian (12 ABC), CICO: head receptionist, vice principal, grandparent volunteer

46 Action Plan (ABC p 4, BRB p 5)

47 Selecting coordinator Modifying school-wide expectations

48 Expectations are… Linked to school-wide expectations All students have same academic expectations – Easy to implement – May not always match each students needs Students have individualized expectations – Easier to match student needs – May reduce fidelity p. 5 ABC; p 6, BrB

49 Implementation Planning Planning for ABC Developing daily progress report Progress monitoring Implementing

50 Designing Daily Progress Reports School-wide expectations AND academic expectations Age appropriate rating scale Teacher friendly Data easy to summarize and determine if goal is met

51 DPR Variations to Consider Morning check in –Points tied to specific behaviors? –Plan if homework isnt completed Daily feedback –BrB: how many breaks to be allotted? –ABC: points for assignments after each class (1,0 or 2,1,0) Afternoon check out –Points tied to specific behaviors –Home component

52 Workbook (ABC, p 5; BrB, p 6)

53 Develop Progress Report (Appendix A) Modify point card to fit your school Homework tracker?

54 Using Incentives in ABC and BrB Rationale: Enhance strength of intervention Ideal: Positive adult interaction functions as reinforcer Options – No incentives, just adult contact/relationship – Add incentive system for all – Incentives are for participation only – Students earn incentive for meeting point goal on 4/5 days – Incentives purchased for varying points

55 Acknowledgement Ideas Small tangible items (e.g., stickers, snack, art supplies) Secret teacher note Extra time in preferred activity (e.g., library, computer) Seat choice at lunch SWPBS points, trip to treasure chest Free ticket to school event (e.g., sports game) Parking pass for a day Lunch with principal or favorite teacher/staff

56 ABC P 6; BrB P 8

57 Implementation Planning Planning for ABC Developing ABC daily progress report Progress monitoring ABC Implementing ABC

58 Data-Based Decision-Making at Tier II Standardized assessment/SpEd eligibility Group conversations Best guess

59 Monitoring Student Progress Determine progress goals Identify measurement system Set timeline for achieving goals 80% of points for 4 out of 5 days within two weeks Work book p 8

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61 Options for Progress Monitoring CICO/SWIS IPBS spreadsheet (http://coe.uoregon.edu/ipbs/)http://coe.uoregon.edu/ipbs/ Make your own spreadsheet BrB ABC

62 Selecting Students for Intervention Standard selection criteria Consider – Students not succeeding on CICO – Students recommended by others – Teacher referral indicates work avoidance – Off-task behavior is key problem

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64 Implementation Planning Planning for ABC Developing ABC daily progress report Progress monitoring ABC Implementing ABC

65 Introduce ABC to Parents ABC Parents Guide (http://coe.uoregon.edu/ipbs/)http://coe.uoregon.edu/ipbs/ Hold parent meeting – Purpose of ABC and why child was selected – Develop homework routine with parents – Review positive ways to respond to child when Daily goals are or are not met Homework is or is not completed

66 Introduce ABC to Students Provide rationale Obtain student buy-in – Student is eager – Student uncertain – Student unwilling Student contract (Appendix C, p. 15)

67 GETTING STARTED: A FEW TIPS

68 What Not to Do Start with ALL possible candidates Begin with the most difficult students Begin with students of most challenging teachers Begin with 3-5 students Students and teachers most likely to succeed

69 Resources http://coe.uoregon.edu/ipbs/ Click on Tools


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