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USDA School Breakfast & National School Lunch Program Requirements 2013-14 Developed By: Linda Boyer, R.D., M.P.H. Nutrition Specialist, LAUSD Food Services.

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Presentation on theme: "USDA School Breakfast & National School Lunch Program Requirements 2013-14 Developed By: Linda Boyer, R.D., M.P.H. Nutrition Specialist, LAUSD Food Services."— Presentation transcript:

1 USDA School Breakfast & National School Lunch Program Requirements Developed By: Linda Boyer, R.D., M.P.H. Nutrition Specialist, LAUSD Food Services Division

2 Introduction & Agenda Overview Objectives The School Breakfast and National School Lunch Programs: A Brief History Obesity: A National Epidemic Initiatives for Change: Dietary Guidelines for Americans MyPlate Lets Move Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act 2010 Definitions

3 Introduction & Agenda Overview (continued) Breakfast Changes and Requirements Breakfast Meal Pattern 2012 Lunch Requirements- a Review Lunch Meal Pattern Components Vegetable Subgroups NSLP Secondary Lunch Pattern Requirements Offer vs. Serve Signage

4 Objectives To recognize the historical significance of the School Breakfast and National School Lunch Programs. To understand how the prevalence of obesity in this country has led to changes in nutrition policy and the School Breakfast and National school Lunch Programs To identify the major initiatives that led to changes in USDA school meal programs nutrition standards. To recognize key definitions used in school meal programs. To understand food components vs. food items and the requirements of each in reimbursable meals.

5 Objectives (continued) To understand the new regulations for the School Breakfast Program (SBP)and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Changes that have occurred and will be continuing Meal Patterns Reimbursable Meals Point of Service To be able to identify vegetables within each vegetable subgroup. To be able to clearly identify reimbursable meals under Offer vs. Serve for both breakfast and lunch. To understand what signage is required in school cafeterias.

6 School Breakfast Program (SBP): A Brief History The School Breakfast Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It was started in 1966 as a two year pilot projected designed to provide grants to assist schools serving breakfasts to nutritionally needy children. First priority was given to schools located in poor areas or in areas where children had to travel a great distance to school. During the first year of operation, the SBP served about 80,000 children at a federal cost of $573,000

7 School Breakfast Program (SBP): A Brief History (continued) The SBP became permanent in The SBP is administered at the Federal Level by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service, and at the State level by the California Department of Education. School Districts that choose to take part in the SBP receive cash subsidies (reimbursement) from the USDA for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve breakfasts that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price breakfasts to eligible children.

8 School Breakfast Program (SBP): A Brief History (continued) The SBP requirements have changed over the years as more data has been received about science and nutrition. The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 directed the USDA to update the SBPs meal pattern and nutrition standards based on the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Changes to the SBPs meal pattern will take place gradually beginning in SY (July 1, 2013).

9 School Breakfast Program (SBP): A Brief History (continued) More whole grains will be offered; meals will supply appropriate calorie levels based on grade level, and the sodium content of meals will gradually be reduced. In SY , the requirement for more fruit will be implemented.

10 School Breakfast Program (SBP): A Brief History (continued) Participation in the SBP has increased dramatically over the years. In Fiscal Year 2011, over 12.1 million participated every day nationwide. Of those, over 10.1 million received their meals free or at a reduced-price. Participation has slowly but steadily grown over the years: 1970:½ million children 1980:3.6 million children 1990:4 million children 2000:7.5 million children 2011:12.1 million children

11 National School Lunch Program (NSLP): A Brief History Like the SBP, the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 100,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It was started in Part of the Federal Food Safety Net. Again like the SBP, the NSLP is administered at the Federal Level by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service, and at the State level by the California Department of Education.

12 National School Lunch Program (NSLP): A Brief History (continued) Just as for Breakfast, School Districts that choose to take part in the NSLP receive cash subsidies from the USDA for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve lunches that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price lunches to eligible children. In 1998, Congress expanded the NSLP to include reimbursement for snacks to children in afterschool educational and enrichment programs to include children through 18 years of age.

13 National School Lunch Program (NSLP): A Brief History (continued) As for breakfast, The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 also directed the USDA to update the NSLPs meal pattern and nutrition standards based on the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The latest NSLP regulation updates became effective beginning July, 2012, and increased the amounts of fruit, vegetables and whole grains in school menus, and set specific grade level calorie requirements. Other changes will include a gradual reduction in the sodium content of meals beginning in SY and continuing through SY This will give vendors time to find new products and reformulate existing products to meet the reduced sodium levels. It will also give students time to adjust to the flavor profile changes.

14 School Breakfast and National School Lunch Reimbursement Participation in the NSLP has also increased. Nationally in 2011, the NSLP provided nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 31 million children each day. Any student at a participating school may purchase a meal through the School Breakfast or National School Lunch Programs. Families with incomes at or below 130% of the poverty level receive free meals Those families with incomes between 130% and 185% of the poverty level are eligible for reduced-price meals (for which students can be charged no more than 40 cents). Children from families with incomes over 185% of the poverty level pay full price although their meals are still subsidized to some extent.

15 CHALLENGE QUESTIONS True or False: 1.The SBP was started in 1946 as a 2 year pilot designed to insure schools in wealthy areas were feeding full priced students properly. False 2.The SBP and NSLP are administered at the Federal Level by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service, and at the State level by the California Department of Education. True 3.Requirements are considered just guidelines, so therefore, we receive reimbursements for all meals served whether or not our meals meet federal requirements. False

16 Obesity – A National Epidemic According to recent statistics: More than 1/3 (78 million) of adults in the United States are obese. In the past 20 years, childhood obesity rates have more than tripled, and a recent study by the Center for Disease Control predicts that, unless current trends change, one in three adults will have Type II Diabetes by the year More than 1/3 of children and adolescents aged 2-19 in the United States are obese. In LA County more than 42% of children are affected.

17 Obesity – A National Epidemic (continued) Obesity is associated with a number of health conditions. Hypertension Heart Disease Diabetes Certain types of cancer Joint and bone problems Sleep apnea Social and psychological problems

18 Obesity – A National Epidemic (continued) Obese children and teenagers are at greater risk for developing these, and other health conditions. LAUSD is committed to providing an environment where students can learn to make healthy choices for life long health. Among the programs that promote this commitment are: The Good Food Procurement Resolution which (among other things) promotes health and well being by increasing students access to fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains. IM IN Campaign which is designed, in part, to raise awareness about the Districts healthy meals to help fight childhood obesity. Urban School Food Alliance- (NYC, L.A., Chicago, Miami-Dade, Dallas & Orlando)- to offer student nutritious and delicious meals while keeping costs down.

19 Initiatives for Change in SBP and NSLP There are major changes to the USDA Nutrition Standards. There were several initiatives for these changes: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010: Focuses on balancing calories with physical activity Encourages Americans to consume more healthy foods MyPlate -A simple tool designed to: Support the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Promote healthy eating Use the 5 food groups arranged like a place setting to make choosing a healthy diet easier Lets Move : Launched by First Lady Michelle Obama in February 2010 with a goal of solving childhood obesity within a generation so that children born today will reach adulthood at a healthy weight. It encourages: Healthier foods in schools Better food labeling More physical activity for children Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010: Updates school meal nutrition standards Reflects the most current 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

20 MyPyramid is now updated to…

21 …MyPlate Foods to Increase Fruits Vegetables Whole Grains Legumes Make half your plate: Fruits and Vegetables Foods to Decrease Sodium Added Sugars Refined Grains Balance Calories Enjoy your food Eat less Avoid oversized portions Get regular physical activity

22 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) Championed by First Lady Michelle Obama, and signed into law by President Obama on December 13, The HHFKA authorizes funding for federal school meal and child nutrition programs and increases access to healthy food for low- income children. Over 31 million children receive meals through the school lunch program and many children receive most of their meals at school. With over 17 million children living in food insecure households, and one of every three children in America now considered overweight or obese, schools are often on the front lines of our national challenge to combat childhood obesity and improve childrens overall health.

23 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) (continued) The Act: Instructs the USDA to establish standards consistent with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans Strengthens school food nutrition standards for all foods regularly sold in schools during the school day, including vending machines, a la carte sales, and student stores. Increases funding to schools that meet the updated nutritional standards Increases technical assistance to schools Strengthens school wellness policies Improves farm to school programs Builds on the USDAs work to improve the nutritional quality of commodity foods Promotes nutrition and wellness in child care settings

24 Definitions A food component is: One of the three food groups comprising a reimbursable breakfast for K- 12, which are: Grains Fruits, and Milk or One of the five food groups comprising a reimbursable lunch for K-12, which are: Meat/Meat Alternates Grains Vegetables Fruits, and Milk

25 Definitions (continued) A food item is: A specific food offered within the food components. A food item may contain one or more food items and/or food components. Examples: o An apple is a food item offered in the Fruit component. o Broccoli is a food item offered within the Vegetable component. o A muffin is the food item offered within the Grain component. It often counts as 2 items if it is a 2 G muffin. A serving is the minimum quantity of a food item that must be offered to meet FBMP requirements for age/grade groups.

26 Definitions (continued) The Point of Service is that point in the food service line where it can be accurately determined that a reimbursable free, reduced, or paid lunch and/or breakfast has been served to an eligible child. The end of the serving line is considered to be the Point of service. This is after all foods that contribute to the meal pattern, including salad or food bars, have been offered to students.

27 CHALLENGE QUESTIONS True or False: 1.The Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 was a major force behind updating school meal standards. True 2.There are now 4 required food group components at Breakfast: Meat/Meat Alternate, Grain, Fruit, and Milk. False 3.For lunch, Seasoned Chicken would be considered a food item within the Meat/Meat Alternate component. True

28 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) BREAKFAST CHANGES Become effective beginning July 2013 Food-Based Menu Planning Grade Groups: K-5, 6-8, 9-12 (LAUSD will use K-8 & 9-12) Half of weekly grains must be whole grain-rich Offer daily and weekly grain range minimums Meat/meat alternate may substitute for grains (at breakfast only)

29 BREAKFAST CHANGES (continued) Calorie ranges, minimum and maximum Offer Versus Serve (OVS) requirements 3-year administrative review cycle includes breakfast State Agency conducts weighted nutrient analysis one week NSLP and SBP menus

30 Grades K-8Grades 9-12 Calories Saturated Fat<10% of calories Fruit (cups per week)2 ½ (1/2 cup per day) Grains (oz. eq.)8-10 (1 per day minimum)9-10 (1 per day minimum) Milk (cups)5 (1 cup per day) Breakfast Meal Pattern

31 CHALLENGE QUESTIONS 1. What are the required food components for breakfast? A.Grain, Milk B.Grain, Fruit, Milk C.Grain, Meat/Meat Alternate, Milk D.Grain, Meat/Meat Alternate, Fruit, Milk Answer: B. Grain, Fruit, Milk 2.What component is no longer required at breakfast? Answer: Meat/Meat Alternate

32 Breakfast - Fruit School Years 2012–13 and 2013–14 K-12 – 1/2 cup Fresh, frozen, canned, and dried fruit allowed Temporary allowance for frozen fruit with added sugar –School Years and No fruit juice limit SY No maximum limit fruit/vegetables

33 Breakfast- Grains Grades K-8:8-10 (minimum 1 per day) Grades 9-12:9-10 (minimum 1 per day) School Year , half of the grains offered must be whole grain- rich (WGR) USDA Foods offers WGR flour, oats, pancakes, tortillas, rice, and pasta Once the 1 oz. Grain requirement per day has been met, Meat/Meat Alternates may be offered, and count towards the weekly GRAIN requirement. Remember, there is no Meat/Meat Alternate requirement for Breakfast.

34 Breakfast - Milk Allowable milk options: -Fat-free (unflavored or flavored) -Low-fat (unflavored only) -Fat-free or low-fat (lactose-reduced or lactose- free) Must offer at least two choices at meals Student may decline milk under OVS

35 Breakfast Component Examples Menu #1: Café LA Coffee Cake (2 G) Fresh Apple (F) Milk (Milk) There are 3 components offered: Grain, Fruit, and Milk Menu #2: Egg & Cheese Burrito (2 G) Orange Juice (F) Milk (Milk) There are 3 components offered: Grain (The tortilla counts as the 1 oz. of required Grain. Since there is no longer a requirement for Meat/Meat Alternate at breakfast, the Egg & Cheese(M/MA) is substituted as Grain and counts towards the weekly grain requirement), Fruit, and Milk. Menu #3: Quaker Oatmeal Bar (1 G) Chicken Sausage Patty (1 G) Fresh Apple (F) Milk There are 3 components offered: Grain (The Quaker Oatmeal Bar counts as the 1 oz. of required Grain. Since there is no longer a requirement for Meat/Meat Alternate at breakfast, the Chicken Sausage Patty (M/MA) is substituted as Grain and counts towards the weekly grain requirement), Fruit, and Milk.

36 CHALLENGE QUESTIONS True or False: 1.The requirement for Fruit at breakfast is 1 cup for all age groups. False 2.There is no longer a Meat/Meat Alternate requirement at breakfast. Therefore, Meat/Meat Alternates offered are now counted towards the weekly Grain requirement. True 3.At least two different types of milk must be offered at breakfast. True

37 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) New Lunch Requirements at a Glance Became effective beginning July 2012 Menu Planning Food-Based Menu Planning – like breakfast, is the only menu planning approach allowed. Age/Grade Groups At LAUSD, Grades K-5 and 6-8 are combined, so there is: One menu for grades K-8 One menu for grades 9-12 Fruit Components Fruits are a separate meal component from vegetables There is a daily fruit requirement One serving must provide a minimum of ½ cup to be reimbursable No more than half of the weekly fruit offered may be juice Vegetable Components Vegetables are a separate meal component from fruits There is a daily vegetable requirement There is a weekly requirement for dark green, red/orange, beans/peas (legumes), starch & other vegetables One serving must provide a minimum of ½ cup to be reimbursable

38 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) New Lunch Requirements at a Glance Effective July 2012 (continued) Grain Component There is a daily grain/bread requirement There is a weekly minimum requirement Half of the grains offered must be whole-grain rich Whole grain-rich foods must contain at least 50% whole grains Meat/Meat Alternate Component There is a daily meat/meat alternate requirement Plus a weekly requirement (minimum and maximum) Milk Component 2 different types of milk must be offered Calorie Requirement There are calorie minimum and maximum levels for each grade group Calories must be met when averaged over a week Offer versus Serve A ½ cup fruit or vegetable component must be selected as part of the reimbursable lunch meal Monitoring There is a 3-year administrative review cycle to monitor compliance with meal requirements

39 Menu Planning Approach Changes The Food Based Menu Planning (FBMP) is the only menu planning approach allowed. Food Based Menu Planning requires: Specific food group components be offered Portions based according to age/grade groups Five food components are required at lunch Multiple lines must make all required food components available to all students on a weekly basis.

40 Lunch Meal Pattern Grades K-8Grades 9-12 Calories Saturated Fat<10% of Calories Fruit (cups per week)2 ½ (1/2 cup per day)5 ( 1 cup per day) Vegetables (cups per week)3 ¾ (3/4 cup per day)5 (1 cup per day) Dark Green½½ Red/Orange¾1 ¼ Beans/Peas½½ Starchy½½ Other½¾ Additional Vegetable to reach total 11 ½ Grains (oz. eq.)8-9 (1 per day min.)10-12 (2 per day min.) Meat/Meat Alternate (oz. eq)9-10 (1 oz. per day min.)10-12 (2oz. per day min.) Milk5 (1 cup per day)

41 Components ComponentFood Source Meat/Meat Alternate (M/MA)Meat, poultry, fish, cheese, peanut butter or other nut or seed butters, nuts, eggs, dry beans, yogurt, and alternate protein products Grain (G)Bread, tortillas, bagels, rice, pasta, rolls, and other products made from whole-grain meal or flour, bran or germ Vegetables (V)Raw, cooked, fresh, dried, canned or frozen carrots, green beans, zucchini, celery, cucumbers, potatoes, etc. Fruit (F)Raw, cooked, fresh, dried, canned or frozen apples, oranges, bananas, plums, pears, grapes, etc., and 100% full strength fruit juice (Juice can only be served when on the menu) MilkFluid, served as beverage

42 Vegetable Subgroups To increase variety, the new regulations require schools to offer all of the vegetable subgroups identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 1. Dark Green Vegetables Arugula Boy choy Broccoli and broccoli rabe Butterhead lettuce (Boston, bibb), raw Chard Cilantro Collard greens Dark green leafy lettuce Kale Mesclun Mixed dark leafy (includes romaine, chicory, escarole and endive Mustard greens Parsley Red leaf lettuces Romaine lettuce Seaweed Spinach Turnip greens Watercress REQUIREMENT: ½ CUP PER WEEK 2. Red/Orange Vegetables Acorn squash Butternut squash Carrots and carrot juice Hubbard squash Orange and red peppers Pumpkin Sweet potatoes and yellow yams Tomatoes and tomato juice REQUIREMENT: ¾ cup grades K-8, 1 ¼ cups grades 9-12 per week

43 Vegetable Subgroups (continued) 3. Beans/Peas: Black beans Black eyed peas (mature, dry) Edamame Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) Kidney beans Lentils Lima beans (mature) including fava and mung Navy beans Pinto beans Soy beans Split peas White beans REQUIREMENT: ½ cup per week 4. Starchy Vegetables Cassava Corn French fries (potatoes, French fried, all types) Fresh cowpeas, field peas, or black-eyed peas (not dry) Green bananas Green lima beans Green peas Lima beans, immature Plantains Taro Water chestnuts White potatoes White yams REQUIREMENT: ½ cup per week

44 Vegetable Subgroups (continued) 5. Other Vegetables Artichokes Asparagus Avocado Bamboo shoots Bean sprouts Beets Brussels sprouts Cabbage Cactus Cauliflower Celery Chives Cucumbers and pickles Eggplant Garlic Green beans Green peppers Iceberg (head) lettuce Jalapenos Mung Bean sprouts Mushrooms Okra Olives Onions Parsnips Purple bell peppers Radishes Seaweed (wakame) Snow peas Summer squash (i.e. zucchini, yellow, spaghetti) Turnips Yellow peppers Plus any vegetables from list 1, 2, and 3 REQUIREMENT: ½ cup grades K-8, ¾ cup grades 9-12 per week

45 National School Lunch Program Secondary Meal Pattern MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY MEAT/MEAT ALTERNATE 2 OZ. GRAINS22222 FRUIT½ C8 OZ. 100% FRUIT JUICE ½ C 8 OZ. 100% FRUIT JUICE ½ C FRUIT½ C VEGETABLEVEG 1 C (RED/ORANGE) BABY CARROTS VEG ½ C (DARK GREEN) CAESAR SALAD VEG 1 C (BEANS/PEAS) PINTO BEANS VEG ½ C (OTHER) CORN VEG 1 C (STARCHY) POTATO VEGETABLEVEG ½ C (OTHER) (Ex: CUCUMBER COINS) VEG ½ C (OTHER) (EX:CELERY STICKS) MILK8 OZ. = Meat/Meat Alternate = Grains = Fruit = Vegetable = Milk

46 CHALLENGE QUESTIONS True or False: 1.Juice may be offered every day for lunch. False 2.A ½ cup Fruit or Vegetable must be selected by students as part of a reimbursable lunch. True 3.To increase variety, the new regulations require schools to offer all of the vegetable subgroups identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. True

47 Part 2: MyPlate & Offer vs. Serve F = Fruit Component V = Vegetable Component G = Grain Component M = Meat/Meat Alternate Component (Protein) Milk = Milk Component

48 Offer versus Serve (OVS): What Must Be Offered at Breakfast? In the daily breakfast meal pattern, 3 menu components must be offered. Once again, a food component is 1 of the food groups that comprise reimbursable meals under Food Based Menu Planning. For Breakfast, those required components are: Grains Fruit Milk

49 An food item is a specific food within a food group. At breakfast, 4 menu ITEMS must be offered for Offer vs. Serve to be used. A Quaker Oatmeal Bar is a 1G menu item. Café LA Coffee Cake is a 2G menu item. A Breakfast Burrito (Bean & Cheese) is a 2G item. (Remember, as there is no requirement for M/MA at breakfast, M/MAs count as a G) An Orange is a 1 F menu item. Milk is 1 menu item: Milk. Offer versus Serve (OVS): What Must Be Offered at Breakfast? (continued)

50 Offer vs. Serve - Breakfast Offer vs. Serve is not used for Breakfast in the Classroom (BIC) Offer vs. Serve must be followed in Grades 9-12 For Offer vs. Serve, you must offer: All 3 food components and At least 4 menu items If offering only 3 menu items, Offer vs. Serve may not be used.

51 Offer vs. Serve – Breakfast- Examples Example #1: The following menu would not be allowed under Offer vs. Serve: Quaker Oatmeal Bar (1 G) 100% Fruit Juice (F) Milk (Milk) Why? 3 components are offered (Grain, Fruit & Milk), but only 3 items are also offered (Quaker Oatmeal Bar, Juice & Milk). Four items must be offered for menu to be Offer vs. Serve. Example #2: The following menu would be allowed under Offer vs. Serve: Café LA Coffee Cake (2 G) 100% Fruit Juice (F) Milk (Milk) Why? 3 components are offered (Grain, Fruit & Milk), and 4 items are offered (Café LA Coffee Cake (2 oz. Coffee Cake counts as 2 G, Juice & Milk). The required four items have been offered for Offer vs. Serve. You will be able to tell by looking at your menu how many items are offered, as we designate them as G, 2G, F, V, and Milk. If it has a 2 before it, it counts as 2 MENU ITEMS.

52 Sample Breakfast Menu French Toast V WG 2G 100% Apple Juice (4 oz) F Milk White, 1% or Fat Free Milk In this sample menu, we have: 3 Menu Components (Grain, Fruit, and Milk) 4 Menu Items (The French Toast has a 2 after it, so it counts as 2 items), Fruit, and Milk

53 Sample Breakfast Menu (continued) At Breakfast, if you are offering 4 or more items, the student may only decline ONE item. This is true whether you offer 4,5,6, or more items. Example#1, Menu as offered: French Toast V WG 2G 100% Apple Juice (4 oz) F Milk White, 1% or Fat Free Milk Since the student may only decline ONE item, they can only decline the juice or the milk. They may NOT decline the pancakes, as that is 2 items.

54 The following menu is offered to students: Maple Whole Grain Waffle 2G Fresh Banana F Milk Can this menu be Offer vs. Serve? Why or why not? Answer: Yes. There are: 3 components- Grain, Fruit and Milk AND 4 food ITEMS: Waffle (counts as 2 items since it is 2 G, Banana, and Milk) Student # 1 chooses: Fresh Banana F Milk Reimbursable? No. The student has only selected 2 components (Fruit and Milk), and only 2 food items, (Fresh Banana and Milk). Student # 2 chooses:Maple Whole Grain Waffle 2G Fresh Banana F Reimbursable? Yes. The student has now chosen 2 components (Grain and Fruit), but has chosen 3 food items, Maple Whole Grain Waffle (counts as 2 items since it is 2G, and Banana. Offer vs. Serve - Breakfast

55 The following menu is offered to students: Italian Cheese Bagel 2G Fresh Orange F Milk Can this menu be Offer vs. Serve? Answer: Yes. There are: 3 components- Grain, Fruit and Milk AND 4 food ITEMS: Italian Cheese Bagel (counts as 2 items since it is 2 G, Orange, and Milk) Student # 1 chooses: Italian Cheese Bagel 2G Reimbursable? No. The student has only selected 1component (Grain), and 2 food items, (). Student # 2 chooses:Maple Whole Grain Waffle 2G Fresh Banana F Reimbursable? Yes. The student has now chosen 2 components (Grain and Fruit), but has chosen 3 food items, Maple Whole Grain Waffle (counts as 2 items since it is 2G, and Banana. Offer vs. Serve – Breakfast (continued)

56 The following menu is offered to students: Cheese Omelet Fresh Orange F Milk Can this menu be offered? Answer: No. There must first be a 1 oz. Grain equivalent offered before a Meat item can be offered and substituted as a grain. We cannot count the Cheese Omelet as 2 G. In this case, a Grain would need to be offered first: Example: Quaker Oatmeal Bar G Cheese Omelet 2G (can now be 2G since we have offered the Quaker Oatmeal Bar first) Fresh Orange F Milk Milk From this example, remember, the student may only decline ONE item at breakfast, so they cannot decline the Cheese Omelet which is 2G.

57 Breakfast Menu:Sweet Potato Pancakes 2G 100% Apple Juice F Milk White, 1% or Fat Free Milk Student selects: Sweet Potato Pancakes 2G and Juice F Reimbursable? Yes. The student has selected 3 menu items: Sweet Potato Pancakes which counts as 2 menu items, and Juice. Student selects: Apple Juice F and Milk Milk Reimbursable? No. The student has only 2 menu items, Juice and Milk. Student selects: Sweet Potato Pancakes 2G Reimbursable? No. The student only has 2 menu items (Sweet Potato Pancakes -2 G). Challenge Questions

58 1. For Breakfast, how many COMPONENTS must be offered daily? A.2 B.3. C.4. ANSWER: B (3) 2.For Breakfast to be Offer vs Serve, how many ITEMS must be offered? A.2 B.3 C.4 ANSWER: C (4) 3.If you offered seven menu items for breakfast, how many can the student decline? A.6 B.4 C.1 ANSWER: C (1) NO MATTER HOW MANY ITEMS ARE OFFERED AT BREAKFAST, THE STUDENT MAY ONLY DECLINE ONE.

59 What Must Be Offered at Lunch? In the daily lunch meal pattern, all 5 menu components must be offered. A component is 1 of the food groups that comprise reimbursable meals under FBMP. These 5 components are: Meat/Meat Alternate Grain Vegetables Fruit Fluid Milk

60 An item is a specific food within a food group. Examples: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger Slider is a menu item that contains 2 components – Meat/Meat Alternate and Grain: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger M Whole Wheat Bun G Wings of Fire is a menu item that contains 1 component – Meat M An Apple is a menu item that contains 1 component – Fruit F Milk is a menu item that contains 1 component - Milk What Must Be Offered? (continued)

61 A serving is the minimum quantity of a food item that must be offered to meet FBMP requirements for age/grade groups. You must follow menus, recipes and portion sizes to make sure the daily and weekly requirements are met.

62 Offer Versus Serve – Lunch For a reimbursable lunch meal: All five menu components must be offered Students must select 3 components, and one component MUST be either a fruit OR a vegetable component, and o The serving size of the fruit or vegetable component must equal a minimum of ½ cup Full component fruit and vegetable portions MUST be offered to students. By following the recipes, you will ensure that you are serving the correct portion. To ensure that all vegetable subgroups are met, you must serve the vegetables that are listed on the daily menu.

63 Offer versus Serve – Lunch K-8 Sites The following menu is offered to K-8 students: Seasoned Chicken M Whole Wheat Roll G Seasoned Deli Roasters V Fresh Apple F Milk, 1% or Fat Free Milk Student # 1 chooses: Seasoned Chicken M Fresh Apple F Reimbursable? No. The student has only selected 2 components, Meat and Fruit. A third component must be selected. Student # 2 chooses: Whole Wheat Roll G Seasoned Deli Roasters V Milk, 1% Milk Reimbursable? Yes. The student has now chosen 3 different components, Grain, Vegetable, and Milk.

64 The following menu is offered to K-8 students: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger Slider: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger M Whole Wheat Bun G Seasoned Baked Wedges V Grapes F Milk, 1% or Fat Free Milk Student # 1 chooses: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger Slider: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger M Whole Wheat Bun G Milk, 1% Milk Reimbursable? No. Although the student has selected 3 components (Meat, Grain, and Milk), they did not select the required Fruit or Vegetable component. They must take a Fruit or Vegetable for the meal to be reimbursable. Student # 2 chooses: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger Slider: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger M Whole Wheat Bun G Seasoned Baked Wedges V Reimbursable? Yes. The student has chosen 3 components – Meat, Grain and Vegetable. Offer versus Serve- Lunch K-8 Sites (continued)

65 The following menu is offered to K-8 students: Enchiladas M G Pinto Beans V Orange F Milk, 1% or Fat-Free Milk Student #1 chooses:Enchiladas M G Orange F Reimbursable? Yes. The student selected 2 items and 3 components, Meat/Meat Alternate, Grain, and Fruit. Student #2 chooses: Pinto Beans V Milk, Fat Free Milk Reimbursable? No. The student has only selected 2 items and 2 components, Vegetable and Milk. The student must take either the Baja Burrito, the Orange, or both. Offer versus Serve- Lunch K-8 Sites (continued)

66 The following menu is offered to 9-12 students: Seasoned Chicken M Whole Wheat Roll G Seasoned Deli Roasters -1/2 cup V Baby Carrots -1/2 cup V Wildberry Juice -8 oz. F Milk, 1% or Fat Free Milk Student # 1 chooses: Whole Wheat Roll G Wildberry Juice F Milk, Fat Free Milk Reimbursable? Yes. The student has selected 3 items and 3 components, Grain, the required Fruit, and Milk. Student # 2 chooses: Seasoned Deli Roasters V Baby Carrots V Milk, 1% Milk Reimbursable? No. Although the student has selected 3 items, they have only selected 2 components, Vegetable and Milk. A third component must be selected. Offer versus Serve - Lunch 9-12 Sites

67 The following menu is offered to 9-12 students: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger Slider: 100% Charbroiled Beef Burger M Whole Wheat Bun G Seasoned Baked Wedges – 1 cup V Apple F Pear F Milk, 1% or Fat Free Milk Student # 1 chooses: Seasoned Baked Wedges V Apple F Pear F Reimbursable? No. Although the student has selected 3 items, they have only selected 2 components, Vegetable and Fruit. A third component must be selected. Student # 2 chooses: Apple F Pear F Milk, 1% Milk Reimbursable? No. The student has chosen 3 items, but only 2 components – Fruit, and Milk. They must select one more component. Offer versus Serve - Lunch 9-12 Sites (continued)

68 The following menu is offered to 9-12 students: Enchiladas M G Pinto Beans- ½ cup V Romaine Salad – ½ cup V Wildberry Juice – 8 oz. F Milk, 1% or Fat Free Milk Student #1 chooses:Pinto Beans V Wildberry Juice F Reimbursable? No. The student has only taken 2 items and 2 components-Vegetable and Fruit. The student must take another different component, either the Enchiladas or the Milk. If the student were to choose the Wildberry Juice or Romaine Salad, even though it would be 3 items, it would still be only 2 components, Vegetable and Fruit. Student #2 chooses:Enchiladas M G Pinto Beans V Romaine Salad V Wildberry Juice F Milk, 1% or Fat Free Milk Reimbursable? Yes. The student has chosen the entire meal offered. Offer versus Serve 9-12 Sites (continued)

69 F = Fruit Component V = Vegetable Component G = Grain Component M = Meat/Meat Alternate Component (Protein) Milk = Milk Component Remember…… 5 components must be offered Students MUST select 3 different colors At least one of the components must be a Fruit or Vegetable

70 THE LAST OF THE CHALLENGE QUESTIONS!! Are the following meals reimbursable? Student selects: Spaghetti & Meatballs M G and Grapes F Yes. The student has selected 3 different components, and one of them is the required Vegetable or Fruit. Student selects: Spaghetti and Meatballs M G and Milk Milk No. The student has 3 different components, but they did not take the required Vegetable or Fruit. Student selects: BBQ Chicken, M Homestyle Wheat Bread, G and Celery Sticks V Yes. The student has 3 different components, and one of them is a Vegetable or Fruit. M F G

71 Student selects: Green Salad, V Baby Carrots, V and Milk Milk No. The student has selected 3 items, but only 2 components, Vegetable and Milk. The student must choose one additional different component. Student selects: Wings of Fire, M Apple, F Orange, F and Milk Milk Yes, the student has chosen 4 items and has 3 different components, Meat, Fruit, and Milk. Student selects: Lean Turkey Deli Sandwich, M G, and Milk Milk No. The student has selected 2 items and 3 components, but has not selected the required fruit or vegetable component. They must select either a fruit, a vegetable, or both. Are the following reimbursable meals?

72 Student selects: BBQ Chicken, M Homestyle Wheat Bread, G and Milk Milk No. The student has 3 different components, but they did not take the required Vegetable or Fruit. Student selects: Baby Carrots V Apple F and Milk Milk Yes. The student has 3 different components- Vegetable, Fruit, and Milk. Student selects: Teriyaki Bowl M G V Yes. The student has 3 different components- Meat, Grain, and Vegetable.

73 Signage School Districts are required to have signage for breakfast and lunch meals. Signage needs to be placed in a visible location at or near the beginning of the serving line. The signage must indicate what foods are part of the reimbursable meal so that the student can easily choose all of the required components in the correct portion size. The signage should include: The number of choices of fruits and grains the student may select and The minimum requirements for Offer versus Serve

74 Signage Samples Todays Breakfast Menu Offered:Banana Bread Apple Juice Milk Student may select: Banana Bread, Apple Juice, and Milk Banana Bread and Apple Juice or Banana Bread and Milk

75 Signage Samples K-8 Lunch (continued) Todays Lunch Menu Offered:Seasoned Chicken Whole Wheat Naan Baby Carrots Fresh Banana Milk White, 1% or Fat Free Possible Signage: Student must select: Entire menu offered (Seasoned Chicken, WW Naan, Baby Carrots, Fresh Banana, and Milk) or Baby Carrots or Banana and 2 or 3 other components offered or Baby Carrots and Banana and 1 or 2 other component offered

76 Signage Samples 9-12 Lunch (continued) Todays Lunch Menu Offered:Seasoned Chicken Whole Wheat Naan Caesar Salad Cucumber Coins 100% Apple Juice Milk White, 1% or Fat Free Possible Signage: Student must select: Entire menu offered (Seasoned Chicken, WW Naan, Caesar Salad, Cucumber Coins, Apple Juice and Milk) or Caesar Salad OR Cucumber Coins and 2, 3 or 4 other components offered or Caesar Salad AND Cucumber Coins and 2, 3 or 4 other components or Apple Juice and 2, 3 or 4 other components. If student chooses both vegetable options and apple juice, one additional item must be chosen.

77 Los Angeles Unified School District Food Services Division Thank You!!


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