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Game Design with Kodu Game Lab. Introductions Richard Olsen Assistant Director, ideasLAB Ashley Spagnol Eltham Primary School.

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Presentation on theme: "Game Design with Kodu Game Lab. Introductions Richard Olsen Assistant Director, ideasLAB Ashley Spagnol Eltham Primary School."— Presentation transcript:

1 Game Design with Kodu Game Lab

2 Introductions Richard Olsen Assistant Director, ideasLAB Ashley Spagnol Eltham Primary School

3 Kourse Overview Module 1 What is Kodu Game Lab What is a Game Module 2 Solve three tutorials Learn about bots and objects Write our first program

4 Kourse Overview Module 3 Generate Game Ideas Look at School Examples from Australia Design templates used by students Module 4 Design Patterns and Code Recipes Game Space

5 Kourse Overview Module 5 Game Progress Game Play Game Communication Module 6 Design Process Debugging and Troubleshooting

6 Kourse Overview Module 7 Next Steps Getting Help Online Kodu Kup

7 Module 1

8 Kodu Team Hello

9 Activity 1.1 Introduce Yourself If you were a game character what would you be like?

10 Activity 1.1 Name: Imberius Powers: The ability to steal food from others without being detected. 3 Things that make me special: 1.Stealth 2.Pick pocketing 3.Charm

11 Activity 1.2 Kodu is a visual programming language made specifically for creating games. It is designed to be accessible for children and enjoyable for anyone. The visual nature of the language allows for rapid design iteration using only an Xbox game controller for input (mouse/keyboard input is also supported).

12 What is Kodu Game LAB? Visual programming language aimed at kids for rapid game development 3D worlds and game play Xbox Controller or Keyboard and Mouse Currently in Technical Preview Small Games

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16 What does it take to teach kids to program? What has been excluded: –Loops –Branching –Variables –Typing –Syntax Errors

17 What does it take to teach kids to program? So what has been left in? –Objects –Message Passing –Sensors –Filters –Actuators –Modifiers

18 Huh?

19 What CAN YOU MAKE?

20 Activity 1.3 What is a game? Record the names of five (5) of your favourite games in the space provided in your manual.

21 Activity 1.3 What are the key factors that makes a game, a game?

22 Activity 1.3 Games are fun. Games have rules. Games have an objective. Games have winners and losers. Games require players to make decisions and require skill. Games are an experience.

23 Activity 1.3 If youve written a software subroutine that takes more than ten arguments, look again. You probably missed a few. Alan Kay A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playful attitude. Jesse Schell

24 Activity 1.4 Game Review Name: Bonk-Out Objective: Knock over the castles while protecting the sticks. Rules: The A button launches the pucks. Push bots can also launch pucks. Pucks destroy everything but the player. The player can control the pucks by bouncing them away. Why is it fun? The game is fun because it is simple and fast moving.

25 Activity 1.4 Share what you find……

26 Module 1: Recap We have covered: -Rationale for using Kodu Game Lab -The definition of a game -Examples of games made with Kodu Game Lab

27 Module 2

28 Activity 2.1: Tutorial 1 Objective: Kodu wants to visit the castle.

29 Activity 2.2: Tutorial 2

30 Activity 2.2: Tutorial 3

31 Activity 2.3: Getting to Know the Bots and Objects

32 Activity 2.4: Programming Bots Physical Sensors

33 Activity 2.4: Programming Bots Physical Actions

34 Activity 2.4: Programming Bots WHEN sensor filter DO action modifier

35 Activity 2.5: Programming Bots Our first game: Ideas Tag Treasure Hunt Requirements 1 bot that the player controls 1 bot controlled with AI

36 Activity 2.5: Programming Bots

37 Module 2: Recap We have covered: We have completed Tutorials 1,2 & 3 We met the bots and objects We have an understanding of the Kodu Game Lab programming language We have written our first program

38 Module 3

39 Activity 3.1: Generating Game Ideas If we were going to start making our first second Kodu Game Lab game now (were not), what would you make? Think of an idea for a Kodu Game Lab game, record your idea in your manual.

40 Activity 3.2: Game Ideas

41 Activity 3.3: School Case Studies Yarra Road Primary School Grade 5 and 2 students working together in pairs Cyber safety theme Requirement to include a maze

42 Activity 3.3: School Case Studies Laurimar Primary School Worked in pairs Provided assessment criteria

43 Activity 3.3: School Case Studies Eltham Primary School

44 Activity 3.3: School Case Studies Elsternwick Primary School

45 Module 3: Recap We have covered: We have started thinking about the games we may make. We have learnt how some schools have used Kodu Game Lab We have

46 Module 4

47 Activity 4.1: Designing Games

48 Activity 4.2: Game Design Patterns A way to describe design choices that reoccur in many games An explanation to why these design choices have been made A guide of how to make similar design choices in your own game project –What is required to make the pattern emerge –What consequences can the pattern have on game play?

49 Activity 4.2: Game Design Patterns Name Problem Solution Consequences

50 Activity 4.2: Kodu Game Lab Recipes Code Recipes Are language specific solutions to common coding problems.

51 Activity 4.2: Kodu Game Lab Recipes Game Space Game Progress Game Play Game Information

52 Activity 4.3: Game Space Patterns Open World Games using the open world design patterns allow the player to roam wherever they want. Open world games usually involve non-linear game play with players able choose the sequence in which they complete game tasks. The camera follows the player (which is the default with Kodu Game Lab) and therefore open world games are more suitable for single player games.

53 Activity 4.3: Game Space Patterns

54 Race Racing games require the player to race around a pre-defined track or space. Often there are checkpoints, with goal either to beat opponents or register a fast time. Racing games closely mirror real life races and are therefore a simple pattern to understand and to play.

55 Activity 4.3: Game Space Patterns

56 Side Scrolling A platform game is a game that the player can only move in 2D dimensions, it also called a side scroller. Side Scrolling games usually require the player to do lots of jumping, over gaps and over other obstacles that may or may not be moving. Side scrolling games were extremely popular in the 80s and have a nostalgic feel when played.

57 Activity 4.3: Game Space Patterns

58 Maze Using a maze as your game world turns your game into a puzzle requiring the player to use skill to find the correct route. Some mazes have a single route that needs to be discovered while other mazes have multiple possible routes.

59 Activity 4.3: Game Space Patterns

60 Fixed Board Some games spaces are small fixed areas. These game spaces are more suited to multiplayer games without split screen functionality. By having a set space and a fixed camera all players have the same perspective.

61 Activity 4.3: Game Space Patterns

62 Module 4: Recap We have covered: The importance of the game space The role of game design patterns The role of Kodu Game Lab Recipes Explored common game space patterns and recipes

63 Module 5

64 Activity 5.1: Game Progress Patterns Time Limit Time Limits require a player to complete an action or achieve a goal or alternatively sets a time that the player must survive in the game in order to win. Countdown clocks usually display the time remaining to give the game a sense of urgency. Some games feature time bonuses that are gained through achieving certain tasks.

65 Activity 5.1: Game Progress Patterns

66 Scores Scores are a numerical representation of a players success. Points can be added to a players score for achieving certain goals or deducted for failed activities. A players score is usually displayed at all times during a game, often points achieved are displayed as an overlay as the goal is achieved adding to the sense of achievement and progress.

67 Activity 5.1: Game Progress Patterns

68 Health The health of the players bot can also be used to indicate progress within the game. A health bar shows the current health of the character and provides immediate feedback to player.

69 Activity 5.1: Game Progress Patterns

70 Save Points Save Points (also called Check Points) are convenient points in a game, usually after a hard section of the game has been completed where the game is either saved automatically or given the option. If the user fails during the next section of the game, the game is restarted from the save point rather than returning the player to the beginning of the game. This alleviates the problem of players needing to replay easier sections of the game in order to reach their sticking point.

71 Activity 5.1: Game Progress Patterns

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75 Multiple Levels Having multiple levels in a game is a great way to convey a sense of progress to the player. Games also use levels to increase the difficulty and/or introduce new game mechanics.

76 Activity 5.1: Game Progress Patterns Video: Halox Dual

77 Activity 5.1: Game Progress Patterns

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80 Activity 5.2: Game Play Patterns Power Ups Power-Ups give a time limited advantage to the player that picks them up. Power Ups require players to make strategic decisions about when to use them as power up need to be earned or require time to recharge. Power Ups solve the problem of having to complete a variety of tasks of varying difficultly as they let the user have increased abilities to face harder challenges without making the tasks (without power ups) too easy.

81 Activity 5.2: Game Progress Patterns

82 Activity 5.2: Game Play Patterns Transfer of Control Some games allow the player to control different characters at different stages of the game. This could include when a players character enters a car or boards a boat. The new character would usually have different abilities and therefore the game play would be different resulting in greater interest for the player.

83 Activity 5.2: Game Play Patterns

84 Big Boss Games or levels in games often finish with a battle with a Big Boss. The Big Boss is a much more difficult opponent and often has different abilities to the previous opponents. Battling the Big Boss is a great way to build a sense of progress and to give closure to game.

85 Activity 5.2: Game Play Patterns

86 Activity 5.2: Game Information Patterns Alarms Alarms can be used in games to warn players of danger. They can be used indicate that a phase of the game is about to begin or end. Different sounding alarms can be used to notify the player of different events.

87 Activity 5.2: Game Information Patterns

88 In Game Information Dialog boxes can be used to display information to the user, this information may simply notify the user of their progress in the game or it may provide information that the player needs to successful complete the game.

89 Activity 5.2: Game Information Patterns

90 Module 5 Recap We have covered: Game Progress Design Patterns and Recipes Game Play Patterns and Recipes In Game Information Patterns and Recipes

91 Module 6

92 Activity 6.1: Game Ideas

93 Activity 6.2: Troubleshooting and Debugging Identifying risks: Can we do this in Kodu? There are many things that are possible or impossible to create with Kodu Game Lab. When designing a new game it is crucial that the game designer identifies the parts of the game that may not be possible and creates them first, that way if the game is impossible to create time has been wasted creating the other parts.

94 Activity 6.2: Troubleshooting and Debugging Debugging: Why isnt this working? When the game is playing as expected there are debugging lines that can be turned on. As the name suggests the Debugging Lines of Sights and Sounds will show where the bot can and cant see and hear and is very useful in discovering why any code is not working as expected.

95 Activity 6.2: Troubleshooting and Debugging Copy, Paste, Clone: Is there a quicker way to do this? When creating multiple bots with the same programming it is quicker and easier to clone and paste the bot or object. Bots and objects can also be cut and pasted between projects.

96 Activity 6.2: Troubleshooting and Debugging Using Versioning: Whoops I changed something I shouldnt have! When saving major changes to Kodu Game Lab games it useful to save it as a new version. This effectively creates backups of your game which is useful if you happen to make changes that cause your game to stop working.

97 Activity 6.2: Troubleshooting and Debugging Using the Resource Meter: Why is my game running so slowly? Kodu Game Lab is for making small games and when games get too large Kodu starts to slow down, often making the game unenjoyable and unplayable.

98 Activity 7.1: Next Steps How do you plan to use Kodu Game Lab at your school?

99 Activity 7.2: Getting Help Online Workshop Resources Planet Kodu Kodu Kwestions

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101 HELP?? Download Kodu Game Lab Join the Kodu community at:


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