Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Class Name Instructor Name Date, Semester Foundations of Cost Control Daniel Traster Recipe Costing chapter 5.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Class Name Instructor Name Date, Semester Foundations of Cost Control Daniel Traster Recipe Costing chapter 5."— Presentation transcript:

1 Class Name Instructor Name Date, Semester Foundations of Cost Control Daniel Traster Recipe Costing chapter 5

2 The Costing Sheet To complete, it requires: A recipe with a list of ingredients and their quantities Y% for each ingredient as it is to be prepped AP$ for each ingredient EP$ for any item requiring a butchers test The goal of the costing sheet is to determine the total recipe cost and cost per portion. 2

3 Costing Sheet: Heading Recipe Name Number of Portions (Yield) for the recipe Cost per Portion (calculated in the costing sheet) Spice Factor and Q Factor FC% and Selling Price (covered in next chapter) The costing sheet heading includes the following: 3

4 Sample Costing Sheet before Calculations Recipe: Cous Cous with Carrots and Raisins Spice Factor: Portions: 8 Q Factor: Cost per portion: FC% Selling Price: IngredientQuantityY%AP$AP$ converted EP$Extended $ Cous 2 cups100%$4.20/Qt Carrot, diced 4 oz77%$0.68/# Raisins4 oz100%$4.37/# Chicken Stock 16 oz100%$0.84/Qt Parsley, chopped 2 Tbsp1 bun = 8 Tbsp $0.72/bun Salt/PepperTo taste Spice Factor 4

5 Converting Units in Costing Sheet Units in price per unit must match the units in the ingredient list. Invoice units and ingredient units dont often match. 5

6 Common Invoice Pricing Invoices often list prices per case size, which may be broken down as number of units in a case and size per unit. Examples: 12/1Qt 40# 8/5# 6/#10 cans 80 count Written as number/number with unit the first number is the number of containers in a case. The second is the size of each container. 6

7 Making Invoice Pricing Useable 1) Calculate total weight or volume as: Total wt. = number of units X weight per unit 2) For volume, substitute volume for weight. 3) Next, calculate AP$ (per unit) as: AP$ = total cost ÷ total weight (or vol.) 7

8 Example 5a 6# 6oz = 102 oz Total wt. = units X wt/unit = 6 X 102oz = 612oz Cost/unit = cost ÷ total wt. = $16.54 ÷ 612oz = $0.027/oz Diced tomato costs $16.54 for a case of 6/#10 cans. Kitchen tests show a #10 can contains 6# 6oz of product. What is the cost per oz? 8

9 Example 5b 1 Gal = 16 cups Total vol. = 4 units X 16 c/unit = 64 cups Cost/unit = cost ($31.80) ÷ vol. (64c) =$0.497/c Vinegar costs $31.80 for 4/1Gal. What is the cost per cup? 9

10 Possible Complications in Unit Conversion 1.Weight listed on can is not the same as products drained weight. Solution : test a can and use the drained weight for the calculation. 2.Container measures contents in weight but recipe measures in volume or vice-versa. Solution : Open container to measure volume (or weight) and use this figure for calculations. Note: In both cases, Y% is accounted for by test, so Y% becomes 100% on costing sheet. See Figure 5.1b 10

11 Calculating EP$ for Costing Sheet EP$ = AP$ ÷ Y% Y% in decimal form. Only use AP$ with units that match the ingredients units. For items from a butchers yield test, just enter the EP$ from the test and convert to units that match the ingredients units. For items with Y% = 100%, AP$ = EP$ See Figure 5.1c 11

12 Calculating Extended Costs or Extension Extension = Ingredient Quantity x EP$/unit See Figure 5.1d Extended cost or extension is the total amount of money that each ingredient contributes to the total cost of the recipe. 12

13 Total Recipe Cost Sum of all ingredient extended costs 13

14 Cous Cous Recipe: Part II Recipe: Cous Cous with Carrots and Raisins Spice Factor: Portions: 8 Q Factor: Cost per portion: FC% Selling Price: IngredientQuantityY%AP$AP$ converted EP$Extended Cost Cous 2 cups100%$4.20/Qt$1.05/c $2.10 Carrot, diced 4 oz77%$0.68/#$0.043/oz$0.056/oz$0.224 Raisins4 oz100%$4.37/#$0.273/oz $1.092 Chicken Stock 16 oz100%$0.84/Qt$0.026/oz $0.416 Parsley, chopped 2 Tbsp1 bun = 8 Tbsp $0.72/bun$0.09/Tbs $0.18 Salt/PepperTo taste Spice Factor S.FS.F.N/A TOTAL $

15 Spice Factor (S.F.) Adjusts recipe cost for ingredients like spices, herbs, and seasonings. Each operation decides what ingredients are included in Spice Factor. Saves time on costing each spice or herb separately in a recipe. Allows for seasoning to taste. 15

16 Spice Factor S.F.) Divides cost of spices and seasoning across all dishes rather than making heavily spices ones extremely expensive. Can be used to account for garnishes and reject dishes returned by customer Can be applied either to recipes total cost or to cost per portion 16

17 Determining the Spice Factor 1.Decide which items will be included in spice factor. Calculate cost spent on those items over a period of time. 2.If desired, include value of reject or ruined dishes over the same period. S.F. = value of S.F. items ÷ value of total food purchases (over the same period) 3.Convert S.F. to % form. 17

18 Example 5c SF = Value of SF items ÷ total food purchases = $2,600 ÷ $120,000 = or 2.2% Restaurant purchases $120,000 in food over 3 months. Spice factor items over that period are valued at $2,600. What is the restaurants spice factor? 18

19 Adjusting Recipes Cost Using S.F. SF-adjusted recipe cost = Recipe Cost x (1+S.F. in decimal form) Use this equation on all recipes regardless of spice or herb use If dish contains multiple components, adjust each recipe for SF. 19

20 Example 5d SF-adjusted cost = recipe cost X (1+SF) = $27.72 X ( ) = $27.72 X = $28.33 A recipes total cost is $ SF = 2.2%. What is the SF-adjusted cost for the recipe? 20

21 Q Factor Applies only to entrées Accounts for add-ons, side dishes, or other freebies that come with an entrée Added (not multiplied) to the entrée price 21

22 Process to determine Q Factor 1.Complete costing sheet for all possible add-ons (soup, salad, bread, butter, dessert, etc.), if any, that come with the purchase of an entrée. 2.Select the most expensive cost per portion among each set of choices the customer gets. Q Factor Sum of all of the most expensive options for each choice 22

23 Why Q Factor? If guest orders the most expensive add-ons with his/her dish, the cost is covered in the entrées cost (and thus, sales price). If guest chooses cheaper add-ons, the restaurant realizes extra profit. 23

24 Example 5e Chicken Noodle Soup = $0.58 Cream of Broccoli Soup = $0.53 House Salad = $0.85 Spinach Salad = $0.97 Bread = $0.12 Butter = $0.08 Restaurant includes choice of soup or salad and bread and butter with each entrée. What is restaurants Q Factor if: 24

25 Example 5e (cont.) Most expensive choice for soup or salad is Spinach Salad at $0.97. Bread is $0.12 and butter is $0.08 Q Factor = total of most expensive choices = $ $ $0.08 = $

26 Calculating True Cost Per Portion For an entrée, the true cost per portion is the dishs cost per portion + Q Factor 26

27 Example 5f True cost per portion = Cost per portion (S.F. adjusted) + Q Factor = $ $1.17 = $7.39 Restaurants Q Factor is $1.17. If a particular entrée costs $6.22 per portion (S.F. adjusted), what is the true cost per portion? 27

28 To Calculate True Cost Per Portion from a Costing Sheet 1.Divide total recipe cost by the recipes yield Cost per portion = total recipe cost ÷ number of portions 2.Multiply cost per portion X (1+SF) to get spice factor adjusted cost per portion. (This is true cost per portion for non-entrées). 3.If applicable, add Q Factor to get the true cost per portion for an entrée. 28

29 Example 5g Cost per portion = recipe cost ÷ yield =$ ÷ 36 = $3.86 SF adjusted cost per portion = cost per portion x (1 + SF) =$3.86 X = $3.96 Entrée recipe serves 36 portions and costs $ total. Spice factor is 2.6% and Q Factor is $2.78. What is true cost per portion for this dish? 29

30 Example 5g (cont.) True cost per portion = SF adjust cost per portion + Q Factor = $ $2.78 = $

31 Cous Cous True Cost Per Portion Recipe: Cous Cous with Carrots and Raisins Spice Factor: 3.1% Portions: 8 Q Factor: N/A True Cost per portion: $0.52 FC% Selling Price: Total – sum of ingredient extensions (from earlier slide)$4.012 Cost per portion (total ÷ 8 portions)$0.502 SF adjusted cost per portion ($0.502 X ( ))$0.518 Q Factor – would be added to an entrée, but not relevant for a side dish, so True Cost per portion = SF adjusted cost per portion $

32 Summarized Costing Process 3. Calculate EP$ = AP$ (converted) ÷ Y% for each ingredient. 2. Convert AP$ from invoice to AP$ with units that match the ingredient units. 1. Enter into costing sheet: recipe name and portion yield, ingredient list with quantities, Y% for each ingredient, AP$ for each ingredient from invoice. 32

33 Summarized Costing Process 6. Calculate Cost per portion = total recipe cost ÷ recipe yield. 5. Calculate total recipe cost = sum of all extended costs. 4. Calculate Extended Cost = Ingredient Quantity X EP$ for each ingredient. 33

34 Summarized Costing Process (cont.) 8. Calculate Q Factor and add it to the entrées SF- adjusted cost per portion, if applicable. (Note: this calculation may be applied to the total recipe cost and performed before step 6 instead). 7. Calculate Spice Factor adjusted cost per portion = cost per portion X (1 + Spice factor). 34

35 Standardized Recipes Often includes grades and brands of ingredients type of pan cooking method portion size storage and prep information plating instructions diagram/photo of finished dish Standardized (or standard) recipe is a recipe written in sufficient detail that a range of cooks could prepare it as written and the results would be identical. It is the recipe that all cooks in the kitchen must follow when preparing a given dish. 35

36 Why Use Standardized Recipes? Critical to maintaining consistency for guests. A must if costing sheets are to be relevant to the dishs actual cost in the kitchen. They are the source for the ingredient quantities used on the costing sheets. They are a control tool – chefs may: post them prominently distribute computerized yield-adjusted versions daily and/or oversee production closely to confirm compliance 36

37 Portion and Quality Control Critical to meet guest expectations, which prevents customer and revenue loss. Keeps recipe costing accurate, which prevents excessive food cost and thus, profit loss. Often monitored by expediter or sous chef per the chefs standards. Portion control often allows a very small variance (+/- ¼ oz) to account for the real world. 37

38 Tools to Monitor Portion Size Weight: Spring, beam, or digital scales Volume: Measuring cups, ladles, portion scoops, ramekins, kitchen or slotted spoons (somewhat imprecise), or serving containers (like a coffee cup or beer mug) Count: The human eye to count by hand. No variance is acceptable for portion by count. 38

39 Quality Control Examples of quality errors: undercooked food incorrect garnish wilted or unattractive components sloppy plate presentation error on guests special request The expediter should catch and correct errors before they reach the customers 39


Download ppt "Class Name Instructor Name Date, Semester Foundations of Cost Control Daniel Traster Recipe Costing chapter 5."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google