Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Giving and Receiving Feedback Capgemini University Consulting Skills Workshop.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Giving and Receiving Feedback Capgemini University Consulting Skills Workshop."— Presentation transcript:

1 Giving and Receiving Feedback Capgemini University Consulting Skills Workshop

2 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 2 Objectives of this session Objectives To provide a framework for feedback which you will be using this week To identify how to give and receive feedback Benefit from using feedback Improves trust and communication Better performance from team members

3 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 3 Coaching and feedback are critical to successful change Coaching and feedback are fundamental tools to successfully embed behaviour and organisation change Coaching moves an individual from a position of dependence on others to self-reliance and confidence Coaching reinforces and supports other forms of development, such as training, reading etc. Feedback informs continual performance improvement Coaching and feedback both help a team member remove performance barriers and achieve aspirations

4 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 4 Coaching, generally looking forward, is most effective when used together with feedback after an event Specific Events e.g. workshop Feedback from coach Feedback from team members Feedback from others e.g. sponsors PLANREVIEW Aspirations and next steps for the future Team issues (e.g. resolving friction with other team members) Political issues (e.g. H2 deal with sponsors) Personal issues (e.g. addressing excessive workload) DO Anyone can give feedback – not just the coach COACHING Lessons learnt Agree next steps with coach Ensure trust exists prior to attempting to coach

5 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 5 What is feedback? Someones opinion regarding how well they believe you or others have performed. PLANREVIEWDO Regular feedback develops a teams self-awareness and builds trust between its members

6 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 6 T=Trust C=Credibility I=Intimacy R=Risk The Trust Formula: Feedback is key to building Trust T=T= R C x I

7 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 7 Feedback is essential to develop self-awareness Known to selfNot known to self Known to others Not known to others Public Self Blind Area Private self (Hidden Area) Area of Unknown Activity Area of Unknown Activity Our Behaviours THE JOHARI WINDOW

8 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 8 Bs before Cs There are two types of feedback... 1 Positive: strengths Catch people doing something right Identifies and reinforces behaviours that should be continued 2 Constructive: opportunities Supports the individual Points out behaviours that need to change Often you encounter two more (to be avoided!) NO feedback Poor feedback (negative or not specific enough to do anything with) The most important aspect of giving feedback is the intent of the giver

9 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 9 Good feedback is... Describing specific, observed behaviours and associated impact From direct observation vs. heard from someone else Descriptive – not evaluative Specific rather than general Aware of the needs of the giver AND receiver Focused on behaviours that can be changed Timely Checked to ensure communication Given in a caring and constructive manner

10 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 10 Constructive feedback must be handled with care Wording can make it or break it! It is therefore essential to use constructive phrasing: "How to (H2)… progress / improve," rather than "You did it wrong" "I wish I knew (IWIK)… what this means," rather than "This doesn't mean anything" Constructive feedback is not… Critical Waffle About winning or losing About venting Critical Waffle About winning or losing About venting Constructive feedback is risky… Often negative experience for both parties Can alienate Hostile Angry Generally non-cooperative Often negative experience for both parties Can alienate Hostile Angry Generally non-cooperative Mindset: How to help other person be successful

11 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 11 There are some simple guidelines to follow when giving feedback A Process Lessons Learned Give one or two headlines – dont produce a list Start with positive statements to relax the situation and give balance if you cannot think of anything positive, you are probably too angry Make the feedback specific Avoid general comments Dont exaggerate and avoid words like always or never Cite specific examples / data which means that you need to be well prepared Refer to things which can be changed Avoid the you are too short type of statements Give one or two headlines – dont produce a list Start with positive statements to relax the situation and give balance if you cannot think of anything positive, you are probably too angry Make the feedback specific Avoid general comments Dont exaggerate and avoid words like always or never Cite specific examples / data which means that you need to be well prepared Refer to things which can be changed Avoid the you are too short type of statements Ensure that the receiver is open Give the feedback Agree? Seek a solution together Agree to disagree Based on: Joanna Bisdee (1998), Realising Your Potential, Life Directions, Mayfair, London Find an appropriate time and space Yes No

12 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 12 A good feedback process is designed to help the person be successful in the future What the person thinks of his / her behaviour What are the facts? What you think of his / her behaviour What is the impactWhat needs to be changed in the future Think about why you are giving feedback – is it for you or the recipient?

13 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 13 To minimize resistance, ensure that constructive feedback... Is motivated by an honest attempt to help both the individual and the organization Is based on dialogue, not monologue – talk with the individual, not at him / her Is given at time / place individual is ready to receive Results in a consensus about the problem Focuses on behaviour / performance – not personality Offers specific suggestions for improvement Concludes with specific action plans Feedback is constructive when… The recipient has done something The recipient had a success or failure The recipient has time to listen … it is invited The recipient has done something The recipient had a success or failure The recipient has time to listen … it is invited

14 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 14 Follow some simple rules and you will give good feedback to others Prepare Check if the person is happy to receive feedback Find an appropriate time and place Ask and Listen Start with the positives Be specific Talk about opportunities – H2 / IWIK Avoid listing however tempting Give examples Check for understanding Getting the listener to review their own performance first, often covers 80% of the feedback you would have given them

15 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 15 The focus of feedback is not personal criticism Person Vs. Problem Examples of ErrorsCriticising Feedback Bill, you are a walking disaster General Vs. Specific You are rude to people Blame Vs. Change Mary, why did you let defects get so high? Personality Vs. Behaviour You are too quiet Bill you seemed to have a problem when tackling this. Lets understand where the problems are and see what I can do to help you move it forwards … When you said blah blah blah to Bob and stared him right in the eyes for 5 seconds, I felt you came across as aggressive and a bully Mary, lets talk about how we can get the defects back under control You have some really good ideas but you dont seem to share them with the team. How can we as a team work with you to help bring them out? Feedback should be targeted at behaviour, NOT personality and should always be constructive

16 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 16 There are some simple guidelines to follow when receiving feedback Lessons Learned It is easy to stop listening when you dont agree Show that you are listening by maintaining eye-contact When receiving feedback, stay calm and relaxed Dont become defensive too quickly Keep asking for specific examples / data until you are clear If necessary, agree to seek a second opinion from another source Always acknowledge that you have understood the feedback, even if you disagree with it It is easy to stop listening when you dont agree Show that you are listening by maintaining eye-contact When receiving feedback, stay calm and relaxed Dont become defensive too quickly Keep asking for specific examples / data until you are clear If necessary, agree to seek a second opinion from another source Always acknowledge that you have understood the feedback, even if you disagree with it A Process Listen Actively Is it valid? Seek a solution together Thank them and agree to disagree Based on: Joanna Bisdee (1998), Realising Your Potential, Life Directions, Mayfair, London Validate by asking for more information / examples YesNo

17 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 17 If you are receiving feedback … Use the process Dont take it personally Dont get defensive Use active listening skills Take advantage of the opportunity to improve Treat it as a gift Listen and keep on listening Make sure you are happy to receive feedback Ask for specifics and examples Ask for suggestions on what to do differently Seek second opinions if necessary Say Thank-you Its one persons perception. Its one data point

18 Capgemini University © 2005 Capgemini - All rights reserved CSW / Giving and Receiving Feedback / 18 Summary Feedback is essential to the way Capgemini work, both internally and with our clients Feedback must be given in a caring manner – the aim is to help the person who receives it develop and improve Always start with positive feedback (B's before C's). The recipient will more likely listen Effective feedback requires careful preparation – and follow the process


Download ppt "Giving and Receiving Feedback Capgemini University Consulting Skills Workshop."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google