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Developing Exceptional School Leaders

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1 Developing Exceptional School Leaders
July 10-11, 2012 Paul Bambrick-Santoyo

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4 NYS NAEP Scores Are Flat for 10 years:

5 Goals for Today’s Workshop
Establish a common language around the keys to student achievement and teacher development Manage and support leaders in developing teachers effectively and achieving stronger student achievement results

6 Norms: Start/end on time Hand raised
All technology is on-task (no mid-session breaks) Hold each other accountable Dive in to make this your own: no acting Write down burning questions as we go

7 The 1st Lever: A Primer on DDI
July 10, 2012 Paul Bambrick-Santoyo

8 Analysis of Assessment Items
Power of the Question Analysis of Assessment Items

9 Common Core Standard: Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems. (6.RP.3) Use ratio reasoning to convert measurement units; manipulate and transform units appropriately when multiplying or dividing quantities 9

10 Assessment Items: Joe can mow a lawn in 2 hours. How long will it take him to mow three lawns? Joe can mow three lawns in 4 hours. How long will it take him to move six lawns? If it took 7 hours to mow 4 lawns, then at that rate, how many lawns could be mowed in 35 hours? At what rate were lawns being mowed? If it took 2 hours to mow 3 lawns, how much can be mowed in 20 minutes? Jeremy has two 7-foot-long boards. He needs to cut pieces that are 15 inches long from the boards. What is the greatest number of 15-inch pieces he can cut from the two boards?

11 Assessment Big Ideas: Standards (and objectives) are meaningless until you define how to assess them. Because of this, assessments are the starting point for instruction, not the end. 11

12 Power of Analysis & Action
Role Plays of Data Analysis Meetings

13 Role Play Analysis What did you learn about the teachers?
How was this assessment analysis meeting different from a post-observation conference? 13

14 Impact of Data-Driven Instruction
Student Achievement Results

15 Comparison of 02-03 to 03-04: How one teacher improved

16 Comparison of 02-03 to 03-04: How 2nd teacher improved
6th Grade Percentage at or above grade level TERRANOVA 2002 2003 N=43 students 6th Grade Pre-Test 6th grade CHANGE Reading 53.7% 29.3% - 24.4 Language 51.2% 48.8% - 2.4 6th Grade Percentage at or above grade level 2004 N=42 students 5th grade 40.5% 44.2% + 3.7 79.1% + 38.6

17 North Star Middle Schools 2003 vs. 2008

18 K-3 Results: Percentile of All 3 Schools
Median National Percentile Ranking of all grades K-3 across 3 schools Updated – JMA 2011— Update this slide with data in slide 73 Delete Slide – Data in updated format on slide #73 – JMA ES2 – K & VES – K will both have their own slide that reflects this data.

19 SAT Best Scores—2005-2012 Change to grey for non nsa
*updated 08/04/11 – SL

20 AP Exam—History of % of Test Takers
% of Juniors & Seniors Taking AP Exams

21 AP Results—Six-Year Score Summary
Change to grey for non nsa *updated 08/04/11 – SL

22 Impact of Data-Driven Instruction
Sampling of Nationwide Results

23 Dodge Academy: Turnaround Through Transparency

24 Morell Park Elementary School:

25 Stevenson High School 1995-2005:
Year ACT Comp. #Students taking AP % of Students Passing AP 1985 21.9 162 83%

26 Stevenson High School 1995-2005:
Year ACT Comp. #Students taking AP % of Students Passing AP 1985 21.9 162 83% 1990 23.3 495 84%

27 Stevenson High School 1995-2005:
Year ACT Comp. #Students taking AP % of Students Passing AP 1985 21.9 162 83% 1990 23.3 495 84% 1996 24.2 1,375 88%

28 DATA-DRIVEN INSTRUCTION AT ITS ESSENCE: in a Data-driven CULTURE
The Four Keys: DATA-DRIVEN INSTRUCTION AT ITS ESSENCE: ASSESSMENTS ANALYSIS ACTION in a Data-driven CULTURE 28

29 Leading Effective Analysis Meetings
A Leader’s Key Action Leading Effective Analysis Meetings

30 HS English: What role does the leader play with this teacher?
What preparation has the teacher done for this meeting?

31 MS Math: How does Jesse lead Paul to a more explicit action plan? What are the key questions/prompts that he uses to guide Paul?

32 DDI Implementation Rubric
NETWORK TEAMS/INDIVIDUALS: Score a typical school in your district on the rubric. Where are the weakest areas that could be addressed first? NETWORK TEAMS/PARTNERS: Review “What to Do when There’s a 2” in your weakest areas. Identify which actions will be most effective. Decide when you will implement these actions. 32

33 The 2nd Lever: Observation & Feedback
The Key Lever for Teacher Development

34 Confronting the Brutal Facts
Current State of Observation & Feedback

35 Marzano’s Effective Supervision
Average number of observations for rookie teacher: 1-2 times per year Average number of observations for veteran teacher: Once every 2-3 years Bottom Line: Teachers aren’t receiving much coaching. Leaders receive even less.

36 Launch of Instructional Leadership Working Group
Call to Action Launch of Instructional Leadership Working Group

37 Project Goals Collect the best practices around instructional leadership from across network of high-achieving schools Codify them in a way that could be replicated more effectively in every school Do it all in one years () two

38 Seven Levers of Leadership--Instruction:
Data-Driven Instruction: Define the roadmap for rigor and adapt teaching to meet students’ needs Observation & Feedback: Coach teachers to improve the learning Planning: Prevent problems and guarantee strong lessons Professional Development: Strengthen culture and instruction with hands-on training that sticks

39 Seven Levers of Effective Schools--Culture:
Student Culture Creating a rigorous, joyful student culture that drives learning and character development Staff Culture Building a strong, supportive adult culture Managing and Developing Leadership Teams Developing and managed additional instructional leaders who can lead implementation of the instructional levers

40 A practical guide… 3/31/2017 9:23 PM
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41 Impact of Instructional Leadership Guide
Preliminary Results Impact of Instructional Leadership Guide

42 Preliminary Impact Instructional leadership: new leaders met or outpaced assessment results of their colleagues Instructional leadership: non-proficient teachers met proficiency on teacher evaluation rubric at twice the rate and speed Tripled in size and maintained or improved results Data-driven instruction—national impact

43 Goals for Remainder of Today’s Workshop
Establish a common language around observation & feedback to make it easier to coach leaders Understand how to implement all aspects of effective observation & feedback (and have a crack at doing so) Build schedules and leverage training to coach leaders in observation & feedback

44 Seven Levers of Leadership--Instruction:
Data-Driven Instruction: Define the roadmap for rigor and adapt teaching to meet students’ needs Observation & Feedback: Coach teachers to improve the learning Planning: Prevent problems and guarantee strong lessons Professional Development: Strengthen culture and instruction with hands-on training that sticks

45 Keys to Observation & Feedback & How to Coach for it
Our Agenda Keys to Observation & Feedback & How to Coach for it

46 Agenda: Content Introduction The Four Keys to Observation & Feedback
First Two Keys Identifying the Right Action Steps 3rd and 4th Key Effective Feedback Holding Teachers Accountable Feedback on Feedback Building a schedule to coaching leaders Setting agendas to monitor leaders’ feedback Putting it All Together: Leaving with an Action Plan

47 Time to Dive in! Introductory Video

48 Teaching Music: What does Yo-Yo Ma do to teach his musicians to play their instruments more effectively?

49 Big Idea: What is the key to making observations effective?
Bite-sized feedback that you practice to perfect it. 49

50 Obstacles: Write on a post-it and place on table tent in middle of table: What are the biggest challenges our leaders face in giving effective feedback and developing teachers?

51 Why Teacher Development is So Challenging
A Case Study

52 Failure Case Study: What positive attempts did the principal make to manage this teacher effectively? What went wrong in the principal’s attempts to manage this teacher?

53 Making Observation & Feedback Effective
Four Keys Making Observation & Feedback Effective

54 The Four Keys: Regular Observation The Right Action Steps
Effective Feedback Accountability

55 The Four Keys: Regular Observation: Right Action Steps:
Lock in frequent and regular observations Right Action Steps: Choose the best action steps for change in each classroom observation Effective Feedback: Give face-to-face feedback that practices the action step Accountability: Create systems to ensure feedback translates to practice

56 Regular Observation Building the Schedule of Instructional Leaders to Lock in Observations & Feedback

57 Building Your Principal’s Schedule:
PRE-WORK AT YOUR SEATS—PICK ONE SCHOOL: Count the # of instructional leaders in the school Figure out the leader-to-core teacher ratio Goal is to get to 15 to 1 for weekly observations, or 30 to 1 for bi-weekly observations If a large school: determine if principal will solely manage other instructional leaders or if principal will also manage some teachers directly ON YELLOW POST-ITS: If ratio is 8:1 or less: write “Teacher 1” through “Teacher 8” on each yellow post-it—one post-it for each teacher If ratio is between 8:1 and 15:1: write two teacher names on each yellow post-it (“Teacher 1-2”, “Teachers 3-4”, etc.) If ratio is more than 15:1: write four teacher names on each yellow post-it (“Teachers 1-4,” “Teachers 5-8”, etc.)

58 Building Your Principal’s Schedule:
TASK 1—GREEN: Block out all the time where principal will most often be busy with student/parent/external issues when principal must be with students, often have parent meetings, receive tours, etc. TASK 2—YELLOW: Write on post-its each non-teacher meeting principal will have in (individual, team, PD) Each post-it represents one hour YELLOW, PART II: Post each teacher principal will meet with weekly (you already made the post-its)

59 Building Your Principal’s Schedule:
TASK 3—ORANGE/PINK: Map out the core times when principal can do observations Goal: observation time occurs before principal will meet with the teacher each week Goal: min per teacher principal will observe Thus, one post-it (1 hr) represents 4 observations TASK 4—BLUE: Identify big picture work time (2-3 hrs): Block out 1-2 times in the week where principal can work uninterrupted If during day, principal need to be able to practically disappear (leave office) and have peers manage anything other than a crisis

60 Evaluate Your Principal’s Schedule:
Where might this schedule not work? Is there a change we could make to mitigate that?

61 Reflection: What about this schedule makes regular observation happen more consistently? What are the big takeaways for building your principal’s schedule and his/her leadership team’s schedules? 61

62 Rationale For Locked-in Teacher Meetings:
Face-to-face feedback is the most effective way to generate teacher improvement— s only work for teachers who are hungry Don’t waste time tracking down teachers to give feedback—that will translate to not giving the feedback over time Use the meeting to incentivize yourself to get the observation done

63 Core Idea: By receiving weekly observations and feedback,
a teacher gets as much development in one year as most receive in twenty. 63

64 Choosing the Right Action Step
Now that You’ve Observed, Where Do you Focus?

65 Adults can really only improve in 1-2 areas at a time.
Core Idea: Adults can really only improve in 1-2 areas at a time. The most effective coaches, then, narrow their focus to the highest leverage action steps—and nothing more. 65

66 Criteria for Right Action Steps:
Highest Leverage: Will this help the teacher to develop most quickly and effectively? Clear and Measurable: Can anyone understand the action? Can you easily measure if the teacher has made the change? What evidence will you have of mastery? Bite-sized: If you can’t make the change in a week, the action step isn’t small enough

67 Converting Long-Term Goals to Bite-Sized Action Steps--Management:
PD Goal--Too High to be an Action Step Increase on-task behavior during Opening Procedures Still Too High Improve Strong Voice Better Develop 3-word instructions to use during Opening Procedures Square Up & Stand Still during Opening Procedures

68 Converting Long-Term Goals to Bite-Sized Action Steps--Rigor:
PD Goal--Too High to be an Action Step Improve your questioning Still Too High Ask higher-order questions Better Script out inference questions on character motive into the lesson plans

69 Precise Action Steps Your Turn

70 Converting Professional Development Goals to Bite-Sized Action Steps--Management:
Too High Increase urgency Still Too High Improve pacing Better

71 Criteria for Right Action Steps:
Highest Leverage: Will it make the biggest impact the most quickly? Clear and Measurable: Can anyone understand the action? Can you easily measure if the teacher has made the change? Bite-sized: If you can’t make the change in a week, the action step isn’t small enough

72 Feedback on Effective Action Steps:
RECEIVE FEEDBACK (3 min) Share the final action steps for each slide Give feedback to the objectives based on the key questions: Is it high-leverage: will it make a significant impact? Is it clear & observable: does it refer to something a teacher will be able to do when they walk out of the meeting? Will you be able to easily evaluate if they accomplished the lever? Is it bite-sized: can a teacher accomplish this in one week?

73 Converting Professional Development Goals to Bite-Sized Action Steps--Rigor
Too High Increase rigor in in-class writing Still Too High Improve rigor in the Do Now Better

74 Criteria for Right Action Steps:
Highest Leverage: Will this help the teacher to develop most quickly and effectively? Clear and Measurable: Can anyone understand the action? Can you easily measure if the teacher has made the change? What evidence will you have of mastery? Bite-sized: If you can’t make the change in a week, the action step isn’t small enough

75 Feedback on Effective Action Steps:
RECEIVE FEEDBACK (3 min) Share the final action steps for each slide Give feedback to the objectives based on the key questions: Is it high-leverage: will it make a significant impact? Is it clear & observable: does it refer to something a teacher will be able to do when they walk out of the meeting? Will you be able to easily evaluate if they accomplished the lever? Is it bite-sized: can a teacher accomplish this in one week?

76 Reflection: What are your big takeaways for how to write quality action steps? Why could it be valuable to have principals write out their action step before going into a feedback meeting with a teacher?

77 Core Idea: Writing down the action step builds the road map
for effective feedback. When we aren’t clear where we’re headed, teachers won’t be either. 77

78 Choosing the Right Action Steps
Video Case Study #1

79 Case Study #1—Debrief: IDENTIFY ROLES: timer, facilitator, recorder (1 min) Recorder: write a T-chart with “management” and “content/rigor” BRAINSTORM: Identify possible action steps (10 min) Go in order around the circle: each person has 30 secs to propose an action step and justify why they think it’s highest leverage (no one may comment!) If you don’t have an idea, say “Pass” If you like an idea, when it’s your turn simply say, “I would like to add to that idea by…” Even if 4-5 people pass in a row, keep going for 10 min Recorder: Put responses in “management” or “rigor”

80 Write Final Action Steps (10 min):
Discuss & choose top 2 actions steps Write them as precisely as you can Criteria for selection of the 2 action steps: Highest Leverage: Will it make the biggest impact the most quickly? Clear and Measurable: Can you easily measure if the teacher has made the change? Bite-sized: If you can’t make the change in a week, the action step isn’t small enough

81 Reflection: What are your big takeaways for how to write quality action steps?

82 The right action step is the first domino.
Core Idea: The right action step is the first domino. Once you knock it down correctly, you’ll see the next domino behind it, and the chain of improvement begins. 82

83 Top Ten Areas for Action Steps to use with Teachers
Julie’s Top Ten Top Ten Areas for Action Steps to use with Teachers

84 Reflection: Which of these areas for action steps would be most fruitful for me in my work with leaders and teachers next year?

85 Giving Feedback Effectively
What NOT to Do

86 Six Steps of Effective Feedback
Breaking it Down Six Steps of Effective Feedback

87 Coaching Quarterbacks:
How did Jon Gruden coach Andrew Luck to improve?

88 Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
PRAISE: narrate the positive with precise praise PROBE: Use targeted open-ended question and scaffolds to identify the core issue ACTION STEP: state concrete action step PRACTICE: Role play/simulate how to improve current class PLAN AHEAD: Design/revise upcoming lesson plan to implement action FOLLOW-UP: Establish timeline when action step will be completed

89 Breaking Down the Components of Effective Feedback
Taking a Closer Look Breaking Down the Components of Effective Feedback

90 Precise Praise: What makes Serena’s praise effective?

91 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
Precise Praise Genuine—heart-felt, authentic Precise--targets a specific action the teacher took Reinforce Positive Actions, particularly those that are connected to the teacher’s development goal

92 Probe, Identify Problem & Action Step:
How does Julie guide Carly to identify the problem in her class?

93 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
Probe—State a targeted question about the core issue Data-driven: rooted in the end goal of the lesson Data-gathering: figuring out why they took the action Precise focus: narrows the talk to one part of the lesson RIGOR EXAMPLE: “What was the end goal—what should students know and be able to do at the end of your lesson?” MANAGEMENT EXAMPLE: “How long do you want your “You Do” to be during the lesson?”

94 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
CONCRETE ACTION STEP—Get teacher to identify the problem & how to address it: Level 1: teacher comes to issue by self & states clear action step to address it Level 2: leader uses a series of scaffolded questions to lead teacher to the answer Level 3: leader presents data from the observation; then teacher realizes the issue & states action step Level 4: leader states the problem and action step clearly to the teacher

95 Probe, Identify Problem & Action Step:
How does Aja guide Alison to identify her action step?

96 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
CONCRETE ACTION STEP—Get teacher to identify the problem & how to address it: Level 1: teacher comes to issue by self & states clear action step to address it Level 2: leader uses a series of scaffolded questions to lead teacher to the answer Level 3: leader presents data from the observation; then teacher realizes the issue & states action step Level 4: leader states the problem and action step clearly to the teacher

97 Probe, Identify Problem & Action Step:
How does Aja work with Dibran to build the right, precise action step?

98 Probe, Identify Problem & Action Step:
How does Aja work with Dibran to build the right, precise action step?

99 Generate Effective Questions to Guide Feedback
Time to Practice! Generate Effective Questions to Guide Feedback

100 Preparation for Giving Feedback:
Assume you are about to give feedback to the opening video that you observed this morning Generate: PRECISE PRAISE (genuine, narrate positive) PROBE—OPENING QUESTION (targeted, data-gathering) SCAFFOLDED QUESTIONS/DATA TO PRESENT if teacher struggles to analyze his/her weakness

101 Feedback Simulation, Round 1:
IDENTIFY ROLES: Teacher, Principal ROLE PLAY GIVING FEEDBACK (4 min): Begin from beginning of conversation, cut off after 4 min Attempt to follow the three steps: Precise Praise, Probing opening question ID problem and concrete action step

102 Feedback Simulation, Round 1:
DEBRIEF THE ROLE PLAY (3 min) Teacher responds to how they felt during conversation about the tone Did the leader: Praise effectively? Use an appropriate targeted opening question? Use scaffolded questions or data effectively to get you to the right action step? ID what went well and what to improve

103 Feedback Simulation, Round 2:
IDENTIFY ROLES: Teacher, Principal ROLE PLAY GIVING FEEDBACK (4 min): Begin from beginning of conversation, cut off after 4 min Attempt to follow the three steps: Precise Praise, Probing opening question ID problem and concrete action step

104 Feedback Simulation, Round 2:
DEBRIEF THE ROLE PLAY (3 min) Teacher responds to how they felt during conversation about the tone Did the leader: Praise effectively? Use an appropriate targeted opening question? Use scaffolded questions or data effectively to get you to the right action step? ID what went well and what to improve

105 Reflection: What are your major takeaways for how to give feedback effectively based on implementing the first three steps?

106 Practice, Plan Ahead, & Follow-up
Getting to Action Practice, Plan Ahead, & Follow-up

107 Plan Ahead: What does Serena do to support Eric in planning his next lesson?

108 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
PRACTICE---Role play/simulate how teacher could have improved the current class with this action step; Concrete: generate the actual language or actions teacher could have taken Teacher-centered: teacher does the practice (don’t just talk about it! Levels 1: leader takes role of the student or the teacher; serves as thought partner in the practice

109 Practice: What does Aja do to lead Desiree in practicing her questioning?

110 Core Idea: Actual practice makes perfect;
you can’t just talk about it. 110

111 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
PRACTICE---Role play/simulate how teacher could have improved the current class with this action step; Concrete: generate the actual language or actions teacher could have taken Teacher-centered: teacher does the practice (don’t just talk about it! Levels 1: leader takes role of the student or the teacher; serves as thought partner in the practice Levels 2-4: leader plays the student, teacher role plays his/her actions

112 Plan Ahead: What actions does Juliana take to make her planning with Sarah effective?

113 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
PRACTICE---Role play/simulate how teacher could have improved the current class with this action step; Concrete: generate the actual language or actions teacher could have taken Teacher-centered: teacher does the practice (don’t just talk about it! Levels 1-2: principal and teacher brainstorm together, then teacher does lesson plans Levels 3-4: principal models, then teacher follows

114 Follow-up: What are all the things that Julie has in place to make her follow-up with Rachel effective?

115 The Six Steps to Effective Feedback:
FOLLOW-UP--Set time when action should be accomplished and how teacher will show that it’s done Teacher and leader write down the timeline: “ it to me by 5 pm tomorrow.” Observe teachers: write when you’ll observe them (e.g., Thursday Oral Drill) Observe master teacher: write when you’ll observe master teacher doing the same skill

116 Developing A Common Language
Summary Guide to Six Steps of Feedback

117 Reflection: What is the value of having a common language around giving feedback?

118 Practice, Plan Ahead & Set Timeline
Time to Practice, Part 2! Practice, Plan Ahead & Set Timeline

119 Preparation for Giving Feedback:
Prepare For The Role Play Plan how you’ll implement the last three steps: practice, plan ahead, and timeline Use the One-Pager “Six Steps of Feedback: use the prompts that work best

120 Feedback Simulation, Round 1:
IDENTIFY ROLES: Teacher, Principal ROLE PLAY GIVING FEEDBACK (5 min) Begin from the identified action step Attempt to follow the three steps: Practice, plan ahead, state timeline

121 Feedback Simulation, Round 1:
DEBRIEF THE ROLE PLAY (3 min) Teacher responds to how they felt during conversation about the tone Did the leader: Get you to practice effectively? Get you to plan ahead effectively? Have follow-up actions to hold you accountable? Get you to write it down—and wrote it down as a leader ID what went well and what to improve

122 Feedback Simulation, Round 2:
IDENTIFY ROLES: Teacher, Principal ROLE PLAY GIVING FEEDBACK (5 min) Begin from the identified action step Attempt to follow the three steps: Practice, plan ahead, state timeline

123 Feedback Simulation, Round 2:
DEBRIEF THE ROLE PLAY (3 min) Teacher responds to how they felt during conversation about the tone Did the leader: Get you to practice effectively? Get you to plan head effectively? Have follow-up actions to hold you accountable? Get you to write it down—and wrote it down as a leader ID what went well and what to improve

124 Reflection: What are your biggest takeaways for giving effective feedback?

125 Staying on Top of your Principals
Accountability Staying on Top of your Principals

126 The Four Keys: Regular Observation: Right Action Steps:
Lock in frequent and regular observations Right Action Steps: Choose the best action steps for change in each classroom observation Effective Feedback: Give face-to-face feedback that practices the action step Accountability: Create systems to ensure feedback translates to practice

127 System #1—Observation Tracker:
ONE TRACKER FOR ALL TEACHER INTERACTIONS Tab for each teacher: date, type of interaction, 1-2 action steps from each meeting, evidence of accomplishment Summary tab with all teachers and most recent actions PURPOSE Make sure all teachers are receiving the right proportion of teacher observations according to their needs Track action steps more systematically to be able to hold teachers accountable to implementation Set specific goal for teacher success & accurately track progress toward that goal See trends in recommendations through the year

128 Sample Observation Tracker—Individual Teacher Tab:

129 Sample Obs. Tracker—Global Summary:

130 Accountability in Action
Coaching Leaders on Observation & Feedback

131 The Four Keys: Regular Observation: Right Action Steps:
Lock in frequent and regular observations Right Action Steps: Choose the best action steps for change in each classroom observation Effective Feedback: Give face-to-face feedback that practices the action step Accountability: Create systems to ensure feedback translates to practice

132 Build Schedule of Principal Managers/Supts to Develop Principals
Coach Continuously Build Schedule of Principal Managers/Supts to Develop Principals

133 Building Schedule of Principal Mgrs:
PRE-WORK: Count the # of instructional leaders on your team that could manage principals Figure out the principal manager-to-principal ratio Goal: 8 to 1 for weekly check-ins, or 15 to 1 for bi- weekly check-ins Determine: who will you manage? Your deputy? Other ILs? TASK 1—GREEN POST-ITS: Block out these time when you will have non-school based meetings or external issues CELA meetings, other CPS meetings, etc..

134 Building Your Schedule:
TASK 2—YELLOW: Write each principal you will meet with weekly (2 post-its) For bi-weekly principals, write the names of two principals on the post-its TASK 3—PURPLE POST-ITS: Map out the core times when you can do walkthroughs of the schools TASK 4—BLUE POST-ITS: Identify big picture work time (2-3 hrs): Block out 1-2 times in the week where you can work uninterrupted

135 Evaluate Your Principal Mgr’s Schedule:
Where might this schedule not work? What changes could be made (personally or at the network level) to make this function more effectively?

136 Reflection: How can this schedule make your principal support more effective? What are the big takeaways for building your principal schedule and your leadership team’s schedules? 136

137 Coaching Leaders Video Case Study

138 Case Study of Ineffective Feedback:
Context/Pre-Work: Assume you have trained your principals and developed a common language around six steps of feedback Review leader’s observation tracker: what is the frequency of feedback and quality of action steps? Observe Feedback: Use the One-Pager “Six Steps of Feedback” Where could they most improve their feedback?

139 Pairs—Plan feedback for principal:
ID Action Steps: Virtual: decide what you think the core action step is for the teacher in question (we haven’t seen video, so make up a plausible action step based on what you heard!) ID core action step for the principal: what do you want principal to do differently when giving feedback? Plan Feedback Using Six Steps (use template): Praise Probe: opening question & scaffolds (questions & data) Practice & Plan Ahead Follow-up

140 Putting it Into Practice
Role Play Coaching Leaders

141 Feedback Simulation, Round 1:
FORM PAIRS: Work with people with whom you haven’t yet worked ROLE PLAY CONVERSATION WITH PRINCIPAL (6 min) Follow the Six Steps of Effective Feedback

142 Feedback Simulation, Round 1:
DEBRIEF THE ROLE PLAY (3 min) Principal responds to how they felt during conversation about the tone Did the principal manager: Offer effective praise? Get you to the right action step effectively? Get you to practice and plan ahead effectively? Plan follow-up actions to hold you accountable? Get you to write it down—and also wrote it down? Had effective follow-up steps? ID what went well and what to improve

143 Feedback Simulation, Round 2:
FORM PAIRS: Work with people with whom you haven’t yet worked ROLE PLAY CONVERSATION WITH PRINCIPAL (6 min) Follow the Six Steps of Effective Feedback

144 Feedback Simulation, Round 2:
DEBRIEF THE ROLE PLAY (3 min) Principal responds to how they felt during conversation about the tone Did the principal manager: Offer effective praise? Get you to the right action step effectively? Get you to practice and plan ahead effectively? Plan follow-up actions to hold you accountable? Get you to write it down—and also wrote it down? Had effective follow-up steps? ID what went well and what to improve

145 Reflection: What are your major takeaways for how to give feedback effectively to your principals?

146 Core Idea: How to make principals better: observe them,
give real-time feedback, and get them to practice. Effective feedback and practice changes results. 146

147 Setting up a Scope & Sequence for Principal Check-ins
Building the Content Setting up a Scope & Sequence for Principal Check-ins

148 Core Idea: If you want to assess the quality of a leader,
evaluate them on the seven levers. Not only will you be able to predict their future success, you’ll also know what to do to improve that outcome. . 148

149 Principal-Chief Check-ins— Six-week Cycle:
Review observation tracker: have they observed enough? Are the action steps measurable and bite-sized? Are teachers making progress? Observe teachers with the leader: does action step in tracker match what you observe? Week 2: Review Observation Tracker Plan and role play upcoming feedback session for teacher Week 3: Observe live feedback: how well does principal implement six steps? Role Play improving the feedback meeting and plan for next one

150 Principal-Chief Check-ins— Six-week Cycle:
Student Culture Walkthrough: where is the school succeeding and needs to grow on student culture? Observe/review PD: what is quality of school’s PD? Week 5: Spot check—Curriculum and Lesson Plans: what are implications for improving teacher planning? Week 6—Interim Assessment Cycle: Analyze data from interim assessments Plan & role play analysis meetings with teachers Debrief core teacher actions based on data

151 Putting it All Together
Developing Principals for Results

152 Train Your Principals:
24 hours of training materials: agendas, PPTs, handouts, etc. Training Modules: Obs/Feedback, Planning, Leading PD, Student Culture, Finding the Time 30 videos of leaders in action June 2012

153 Observation & Feedback
Next Steps Observation & Feedback

154 Next Steps—Prior to Starting the School Year:
Set up training of principals around DDI & Obs/Feedback Set up observation tracker for each principal Set up principal’s schedules Plan the Roll Out: How to Share Change in Approach with Staff Set up cycle of agenda items for principal check-ins

155 Applying to Your Own School:
What are the next steps we want to take as a network or region?

156 Observation & Feedback
Conclusions Observation & Feedback


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