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This material was produced and/or reviewed under grant SH20859SHO from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It.

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Presentation on theme: "This material was produced and/or reviewed under grant SH20859SHO from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It."— Presentation transcript:

1 This material was produced and/or reviewed under grant SH20859SHO from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. ACHIEVING A TOTAL SAFETY CULTURE

2 Course Objectives Identify Your role in the Total Safety Culture Identify the elements of Total Safety Culture Explain the importance of the three sides of the safety triangle Learn the advantages of Observation and Feedback

3 Agenda A Total Safety Culture Overview What it is Why it is important Motivation - how it affects you The Observation and Feedback Process Supervisor Responsibilities Giving and Receiving Feedback

4 The Characteristics of a Successful Total Safety Culture Safety is held as a value by all employees Each employee feels a sense of responsibility for the safety of their co-worker as well as themselves Each employee Actively Cares Each employee realizes their responsibility to speak- up when a fellow employee is at risk

5 Values, Intentions and Behaviors Cautioning co-workers about performing unsafe acts

6 Safety Triangle 3 Behavior 2 Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, Intelligence, Motives, Attitude, Personality Person Putting on PPE, Lifting properly, Following procedures, Locking out power, Cleaning up a spill, Sweeping floor, Coaching co-workers 1 Environment Equipment, Tools, Machines, Housekeeping, Heat/Cold, Engineering

7 Focus: Accident Prevention At-Risk Work Practices Near Miss Minor Injury Serious Injury Fatality Total Safety Culture

8 Developing Safe Habits Unconsciously Incompetent

9 Developing Safe Habits Consciously Incompetent Unconsciously Incompetent

10 Developing Safe Habits Consciously Competent Consciously Incompetent Unconsciously Incompetent

11 Developing Safe Habits Unconsciously Competent Consciously Competent Consciously Incompetent Unconsciously Incompetent

12 Direction Is NOT Enough Direction Motivation Behavior

13 Understanding Motivation

14 ABC Model What Motivates Behavior? ACB A ctivators B ehavior C onsequences Guides or directs behavior Signs Policies Directive Feedback Training/demonstrations Goal Setting Modeling Lectures

15 ABC Model What Motivates Behavior? ACB A ctivators B ehavior C onsequences Actions Driving the speed limit Putting on PPE Locking out power Using equipment guards Giving a safety talk Cleaning up spills Coaching others about safe work practices Guides or directs behavior Signs Policies Directive Feedback Training/demonstrations Goal Setting Modeling Lectures

16 ABC Model What Motivates Behavior? ACB A ctivators B ehavior C onsequences Motivates the future occurrence of behaviors Self-approval Supervisor approval Reinforcing feedback No injury Pizza Lunch Co-worker approval Thank You Actions Driving the speed limit Putting on PPE Locking out power Using equipment guards Giving a safety talk Cleaning up spills Coaching others about safe work practices Guides or directs behavior Signs Policies Directive Feedback Training/demonstrations Goal Setting Modeling Lectures

17 Effective Activators Activators must be Specific Used sparingly Clear Vary Imply immediate consequences

18 Actively Caring Increases Effectiveness Please hold handrail when going up and down stairs Caution! Stairs may be wet. Please hold handrail on stairs. Set a safe example for others. Please hold handrail on stairs

19 Activators are NOT Enough Activators Motivation Behavior

20 The consequences that motivate behavior are: Certain to happen Happen immediately Have significant impact Least effective consequences are: Uncertain- injury or discipline do not occur every time Delayed- loss of hearing happens over time so the consequence of not wearing ear plugs is delayed Insignificant Consequences that Motivate

21 Using the ABC Model Identify the consequences that encourage and discourage the at-risk work practices Identify the activators Consider changing and/or modifying both the consequences and/or the activators to create an unconsciously competent work practice

22 Positive VS. Negative Consequences What works best? Positive consequences Negative consequences How does each effect the employee?

23 Naturally Rewarding Consequences

24 This material was produced and/or reviewed under grant SH20859SHO from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Penny Exercise The Penny exercise is designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of different types of feedback. It involves a blindfolded volunteer tossing pennies into a box. In most cases constructive feedback and encouragement produces better results during the exercise than no feedback or negative non-constructive feedback.

25 Penny Exercise Directions: 1. Volunteer #1: say nothing as she/he tosses the pennies into the box. 2. Volunteer #2: respond negatively when she/he misses, say nothing when she/he gets the pennies into the box. 3. Volunteer #3: praise, give encouragement, hints as she/he tosses pennies.

26 Feedback Influences Work Practices Reinforcing feedback increases desired work practices Corrective feedback decreases undesirable work practices

27 Functions of Feedback Provides needed information Provides social support: co-worker support and acceptance manager/supervisor approval

28 Guidelines for Receiving Feedback Be open and receptive Think BEFORE you react Be objective/not defensive Avoid taking a position Ask for specifics Actively LISTEN Work together on potential solutions Reach an agreement Say thank you

29 2 Actively Caring and the Safety Triangle 3 Person Sharing skills and knowledge with each other. Listening, helping in a crisis, recognizing team member contributions. Behavior Observing co-workers, giving feedback, modeling behavior. 1 Environment Making sure needed equipment is available. Posting warning signs, housekeeping, cleaning others work area. Often neglected in traditional safety approaches. Little or no feedback on or encouragement of safe behavior.

30 Key Points of TSC Creating a Total Safety Culture requires: Safety is held as a value by all employees. A value is a belief that does not change with the situation Each employee feels a sense of responsibility for the safety of their co-worker as well as themselves Each employee performs Actively Caring Each employee is willing and able to go beyond the call of duty for others

31 Whats Next? What do employees need to do to support the shift to a Total Safety Culture?

32 Thank You! l Questions or comments?! These materials are derived, in full or in part, from the work of Safety Performance Solutions.


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