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New Urbanism. What is it? Urban design movement originating in the late 80s – early 90s. Aims to reform all aspects of real estate development. Involves:

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Presentation on theme: "New Urbanism. What is it? Urban design movement originating in the late 80s – early 90s. Aims to reform all aspects of real estate development. Involves:"— Presentation transcript:

1 New Urbanism

2 What is it? Urban design movement originating in the late 80s – early 90s. Aims to reform all aspects of real estate development. Involves: new development, urban retrofits, and suburban infill. Affects both regional and local plans. Supports the creation and restoration of diverse, walkable, compact, mixed-use communities. Currently 500 New Urbanist projects in the U.S. alone, half in urban areas.

3 Why do we need it? Disinvestments in central cities. Spread of placeless sprawl. Increasing separation of race and income. Environmental deterioration. Loss of agricultural lands and wilderness.

4 Root Causes: Changing household demographics. Land consumption without regard to natural features or physical limits. Federal and state policies that encourage low-density sprawl. Street standards are insensitive to human needs. Zoning codes leave little room for individualization.

5 Charter of New Urbanism The Region: Metropolis, city and town. On a regional scale: Finite places with geographic boundaries. Fragile relationship between urban area and hinterland. Development patterns should not blur edges of the metropolis. Infill development should be encouraged over peripheral expansion. Revenues and resources should be shared among the municipalities to avoid destructive competition.

6 Charter of New Urbanism Neighborhood: the district and the corridor. On a neighborhood scale: Neighborhoods should be compact, pedestrian- friendly and mixed-use. Broad range of housing types to bring diversity. Civic, institutional and commercial activity should be embedded in neighborhoods, not isolated. Public transportation should be a viable alternative to the automobile. Parks should be a viable alternative to the automobile.

7 Charter of New Urbanism The block, street and building. On a block scale: Individual architectural projects should be linked to their surroundings. Architecture and landscape design should grow from local climate, topography, history, and building practice. Development must adequately accommodate automobiles whiles being pedestrian-friendly. Streets should be safe, yet interesting and open to the pedestrian.

8 Principles of New Urbanism

9 #1: Walkability Most errands should be accomplished within a 10-min. walk from home or work. Pedestrian-friendly street design.

10 #2: Connectivity Interconnected street grid network disperses traffic and eases walking.

11 #3: Mixed-use and diversity A mix of shops, offices, apartments and homes. Mixed-use within neighborhood, within block, within buildings.

12 #4: Mixed-housing A range of types, sizes and prices in close proximity.

13 #5: Quality of architecture & urban design Emphasis on beauty, aesthetics, human comfort, and creating a sense of place. Human-scale architecture.

14 #6: Traditional neighborhood structure Highest density at town center; progressively less dense towards the edge. This urban-to-rural transect hierarchy has appropriate building and street types for each area along the continuum.

15 #7: Increased density More buildings, residences, shops and services closer together for easy walking. To enable a more efficient use of services and resources.

16 #8: Transportation A network of high-quality transit connecting cities and towns together. Pedestrian-friendly designs that encourage the use of bicycles, scooters and walking as daily transportation.

17 #9: Sustainability Minimal environmental impact of development. Less use of finite fuels. More local production.

18 Benefits of New Urbanism Less traffic congestion and driving. Healthier lifestyle: pedestrian-friendly communities. More freedom and independence for children, the elderly and the poor. More open space. Less tax money spent on infrastructure.

19 Ways to Implement New Urbanism 1. The single building 2. Groups of buildings 3. The urban block 4. The neighborhood 5. Networks of neighborhoods 6. Towns 7. Cities 8. Regions

20 Obstacles to Overcome Restrictive zoning

21 Obstacles to Overcome Lack of design standards Prospect, CO Celebration, FL

22 Obstacles to Overcome Lack of truly affordable housing

23 Examples of New Urbanism: Minneapolis, MN Located on the edge of the campus of the University of Minnesota, this new residential community will consist of more then 500 students and faculty. The housing development is complimented by a large street level retail component and a 280 stall heating parking facility.

24 Examples of Good New Urbanism: Oakland, CA An infill project that consists of 92 apts. and 15,000 sq. feet of retail. A model of both racial and ethnic cooperation Golden Nugget Award, Best of the West.


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