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Promoting vocations to the youth and young adults.

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1 Promoting vocations to the youth and young adults

2 Founded on May 16, 1897 The Rogationists of the Heart of Jesus is a pontifical clerical religious Institute. We dedicate our lives for the service of the Church following Christ of the Rogate. We received the Rogate as a gift from the Holy Spirit through Saint Hannibal Mary Di Francia.. We draw our inspiration from the Gospel of the Rogate,The harvest is great but the workers are few. Beg the Master of the harvest that he may send workers in his harvest. Mt. 9, 37-38,Lk. 10,2

3 "The entire Church must formally pray for this aim," he wrote, "because the purpose of the prayer to gain vocations must concern all the faithful, every Christian who has at heart the good of souls and, in a particular way, the Bishops who are the shepherds of the spiritual flock and to whom souls are entrusted. They are the living Apostles of Jesus Christ today." The annual World Day of Prayer for Vocations instituted by Pope Paul VI in 1964 can be considered a response to his intuition.

4 1. The Youth 2. Barriers to the Consideration of ones Vocation 3. Orientations 4. Persons-in-Charge of the Pastoral Care for Vocations A. Vocation Promoter B. Juniors / Religious in Theological Studies C. Aspirants / Seminarians / Postulants 5. Occasions and Places of Vocation Promotion 6. Addressee of the Vocation Promotion Desirable Qualities in Candidates to the Religious and Priestly Life 7. Strategies for promoting vocations among youth and young adults 8. General Procedure of Vocation Promotion A. Steps in Promoting Vocations B. Criteria for Admission C. Particular Cases 9. Vocation Discernment and Youth Spirituality 10. Important role of educators, catechists and ministers in nurturing vocations

5 The Church attributes special importance to the period of youth as a key stage in the life of every human being (JP II, Dilecti Amici, #1). It is the time of a particularly intense discovery of the human "I" and of the properties and capacities connected with it (op. cit., #3). The youth ask questions about the value and meaning of human life and manifest their search for truth, goodness and happiness in many different ways.

6 What keeps the youth and young adults from considering a vocation to the priesthood or consecrated life? Some issues: Secular values: Materialism (Internet), Consumerism, Secularism, Affluence, Individualism Internet: While the youth enjoy the benefits of internet, they are likewise exposed to changing views of human person and human life through it. Issues and problems associated with internet... can lead the youth to crisis of values as they get more and more confused about what is right and wrong, about what is true and good

7 What keeps the youth and young adults from considering a vocation to the priesthood or consecrated life? Some issues: Secular values: Materialism (Internet), Consumerism, Secularism, Affluence, Individualism Consumerism: As in the late 19th century Europe, profit seems to be now replacing the inherent dignity of the human person, and thus, the dignity of work.

8 What keeps the youth and young adults from considering a vocation to the priesthood or consecrated life? Some issues: Secular values: Materialism (Internet), Consumerism, Secularism, Affluence, Individualism Individualism: most of our youth turn to Television, the Inter-net,…etc., and tend to choose their own heroes and role models, and thus, follow some fictitious personalities or even notorious characters that are depicted there.

9 What keeps the youth and young adults from considering a vocation to the priesthood or consecrated life? Some issues: Secular values: Materialism (Internet), Consumerism, Secularism, Affluence, Individualism Lack of family and peer support When youth no longer find guidance and security at home and with their families, they can tend to resort to drugs and other means of escapism to deal with their own problems and cope with their pains, anxieties and sufferings.

10 What keeps the youth and young adults from considering a vocation to the priesthood or consecrated life? Some issues: Secular values: Materialism (Internet), Consumerism, Secularism, Affluence, Individualism Lack of family and peer support Celibacy Fear of commitment to the unknown Debt/college costs

11 What gives young adults hope about vocations? Spirituality of young adults Generosity of young adults as shown in service Eucharist, prayer Religious and Priests who: Give a positive witness Serve as role models Are willing to talk about vocations Campus ministry and youth ministry World (Diocesan) Youth Days

12 We acknowledge with gratitude the kindness of the Lord who deigned to bless our communities with Vocations. True to our specific identity and mission (charism) we cannot but continuously express our solicitude for Vocations, motivated not only by the scarcity of the workers in front of the harvest which still remains so vast, but by the conviction that our growth in number and quality means the growth of the Church.

13 For religious men: According to the nature of our Congregation, which is composed of Priests and Brothers, our Pastoral Care for Vocations should be focused on promoting Vocations both to the consecrated life and the Priesthood lived in the Congregation as Brothers and Priests. It is the special concern and challenge of this ministry to find ways to promote and encourage also the Vocation to Religious Brothers as a gracious and mysterious gift of God, valid in itself.

14 We firmly believe that all our efforts, activities or strategies, both personal and communitarian, to promote Vocations for the Church, and in particular for our respective Congregations, must always be accompanied by the irreplaceable value of a happy and courageous personal testimony of our specific identity.

15 By virtue of his calling, every religious men and women is a Vocation Promoter. Thus, in whatever place and assignment, each member of the community endeavors to promote Vocations to their Congregation. However, there should be an appointed Vocation Promoter who, together with other collaborators, forms a Committee (Commission) responsible in evaluating, suggesting, and setting directives for the promotions of vocations. Their work is closely coordinated with those in-charge of the Basic Formation.

16 There must be a Religious appointed by the competent authority (Superior) as a full-time Vocation Promoter who is entrusted with the task of fostering Vocations to the Congregation. Qualifications must be clear [example: should be a perpetually professed Religious, a member of the Sacred Order (for religious men), etc.].

17 Communicates with ecclesiastical and school authorities; Disseminate information about Vocation in general and about Rogationist Vocation; Establish communication with prospective candidates through vocation campaigns, talks, dialogue. Follow-up qualified candidates for eventual entrance to the seminary/convent. If the Vocation Promoter is not a member of the House Council, he/she is invited by the superior in the evaluation of acceptance or dismissal of candidates.

18 The Vocation Promoter is a member of the Formation Council; if the Vocation Promoter is not a member of the House Council the Superior will call him/her to attend the Council when it comes to the admission or dismissal of aspirants to ask for his opinion.

19 The Vocation Promoter will be provided a suitable place, furnished with necessary materials and equipments by the Delegation Office in his/her apostolate especially in meeting with applicants.

20 Far from delegating all the tasks to the Vocation Promoter alone, each community, besides offering its spiritual and material support, makes the necessary coordination with the Vocation Promoter, such as giving suggestions and counsels concerning all activities directly related to Vocation Promotion. The Vocation Promoter, on his/her part, shall always coordinate with the Superior of the House and his Council and update the Community about his work.

21 At the start of the school year, the Vocation Promoter presents his annual program to his Superior for approval.

22 The acceptance of the candidates to the seminary/convent will be decided by the Superior with the consultative vote of the House Councilors.

23 Vocation Promoters foster collaboration among themselves and at the same time, actively participate in the various vocational initiatives of the local Church. Periodic meetings among the Vocation Promoters of a congregation are highly recommended.

24 Juniors / Religious in Theological Studies The Religious Students by reason of their religious consecration will have a more active collaboration for Vocation Promotion.

25 Aspirants / Seminarians / Postulants Aspirants, seminarians, postulants will be gradually introduced to the work of Vocation Promotion as part of their formation. Hence, a Vocation Committee may be formed to assist the Vocation Promoter in the Vocation animation of the community as well as in coordinating the work of Vocation promotion.

26 It is important for respective Congregation to identify occasions connected to their traditions which are opportune moments to promote vocations (examples: National Vocation Awareness Week, World Day for Consecrated Life, etc.). For the Rogationists, the three most recommended initiatives to celebrate in a special way the gift of Vocations are the annual (1) World Day of Prayer for Vocations, (2) the Rogationist Mission Day, and (3) the Diocesan Vocation Month. The date and the dynamics of these activities must be established with proper coordination.

27 School Fertile grounds for fostering Vocations to our Congregation are the schools. Specifically, in our respective schools (High School and College Departments), all our Educators and Teachers, especially the Principals, Dean and Guidance Counselors, are called to collaborate in promoting Vocations among the students. The young can be led towards greater vocational awareness by emphasizing the vocational aspect of some subjects such as Catechism, Christian Living, Values Education, etc.

28 Parish The parishes, where we meet the Christian community particularly the young, are sources of Vocations. The youth pastoral program, especially in our parishes, shall be organized to lead the young to discover the beauty of their Christian Vocation and their specific calling. Following the directives of the Church as regards empowerment of the lay, the Parishes where we work should also establish vocation promoters among the lay people.

29 Addressee of the Vocation Promotion Identify the prospective candidates. (Example: High School graduates, college students and young professionals).

30 Desirable Qualities in Candidates to the Religious and Priestly Life One who considers a personal relationship with God as an important part of life. One who has an ability and willingness to talk about his/her faith life. One who has a desire to serve others and make a difference in people's lives. One who is willing to sacrifice personal or material gain for the service of the Gospel and the Church. One who is recognized as being approachable.

31 Desirable Qualities in Candidates to the Religious and Priestly Life One who enjoys life, people, and has a sense of humor. One who has the ability to lead and work with people of all ages. One who recognizes the importance of the Church. One who forms and maintains healthy relationships with both men and women. One who feels good about himself/herself, has average to above average intelligence, and has good physical, mental and emotional health.

32 Create a climate of vocational awareness 1. Pray for vocations (Holy Hour for vocations, weekly in some parishes) 2. Priests and religious should show they are happy and excited about their vocation, and joyfully invite others to join them 3. Involve seminary professors, vocations directors, and men and women religious in the life of the community (e.g., celebrating mass, if priests; giving presentations; providing spiritual direction) 4. Invite seminarians and religious in formation to share their stories 5. Publicize young adults from parish or campus ministry who have vocations 6. Preach about vocations 7. Have a vocations committee and involve young adults

33 Model and cultivate a love for the Church and its mission 1. Develop love and respect for the archbishop and the local Church; campus ministries should involve him at the center as much as possible 2. Form young adults in evangelization and apologetics 3. Cultivate a global perspective (catechesis, missionary works, etc.)

34 Cultivate a sense of meaningful sacrifice 1. Connect with young adult idealism 2. Speak of the sacrificial self-giving that is part of both marriage and celibacy 3. Catechize on stewardship 4. Promote short and long term volunteer opportunities

35 Retreats 1. Evangelizing retreats a. Busy Persons Retreat, with involvement of vocations directors b. Awakening retreats; includes leadership development and discernment 2. Vocations retreats a. Publicize the vocations retreats of dioceses and religious communities b. Life Awareness, for young adults seriously considering vocation

36 Make it personal 1. Identify young adults 2. Invite them personally a. To serve in leadership in parish activities b. To ordinations, chrism mass, profession masses c. To visit convents, monasteries and seminaries d. To retreats, discernment groups, and to consider spiritual direction. 3. Accompany them in the discerment process.

37 Invite the parents of priests, sisters and seminarians to give a talk at meetings or at the end of Mass about the joy of being the parent of a priest, sister or religious. Parents need to hear other parents speak on vocations. Speak to parents groups and parish organizations about their role in vocations. Vocation Posters and Bookmarks with information and contact numbers Create a Vocation Website – Maximize the internet

38 The method of Vocation Promotion, while respecting the tradition of the Congregation, should always be in line with the guidelines drawn by the local Church; by the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) through its Episcopal Commission on Vocations (ECV) and the Directors of Vocations in the Philippines (DVP).

39 [1] Sending letters to Ecclesiastical and School Authorities informing them about the planned vocation activities; [2] Preparing the General Vocation Calendar Plan for the whole year well coordinated with the schedule of the Seminary; [3] Securing the availability of Vocation materials; [4] Coordinating with the different school heads for the schedule of the Vocation Campaigns; [5] Visiting, whenever possible, the local Ordinary, Diocesan Vocation Director, and the Parish Priests in the Diocese;

40 [6] Visiting High Schools, Colleges and Universities, asking respective Principals, Deans or Guidance Councilors for the possibility of talking to the senior students about Vocation in general and about the Rogationist Congregation in particular; interested students are given Preliminary Examinations; those who pass the preliminary exams are asked to fill up the general information sheet and are invited for a dialogue; [7] Planning the vocation promotion itineraries involving the Seminary Community members at the middle of the academic year;

41 [8] Campaigning for vocations can also be done in a parish with the consent of the parish priest, preferably when most of the youth are present as on Sundays. Catechists or lay Rogationist vocation promoters of the parish youth organizations can be of great help in individuating possible candidates.

42 The Vocation Orientation Those who passed the preliminary exams are invited to attend a Vocation Orientation in the Seminary or in some other suitable venue usually during the Christmas break and Easter vacation period. The prepared schedule of activities which includes prayer encounters, conferences, workshops, interviews, and Entrance Examinations to the Rogationist Seminary College of Philosophy.

43 The Vocation Orientation Those who passed the preliminary exams are invited to attend a Vocation Orientation in the Seminary or in some other suitable venue usually during the Christmas break and Easter vacation period. The prepared schedule of activities which includes prayer encounters, conferences, workshops, interviews, and Entrance Examinations to the Rogationist Seminary College of Philosophy.

44 The Vocation Follow-up (Home Visits) The candidate who passed is informed through an official letter from the seminary addressed to the candidate and his parents; and will be visited by the Vocation Promoter or another designated Rogationist priest, to explain to the parents their important role in their sons vocation, and most especially, to know the family background and situation, and to discuss pertinent considerations connected to his entrance to the seminary. Further information about the candidate can be obtained through his Parish Priest, School Principal, Guidance Counselor, Teacher-Adviser, and Rogationist seminarians from the same area.

45 Criteria for Admission Capacity to stand firm for ones decision; Right motivation or intention; Physical and psychical fitness; Age bracket: For High School Graduates – 16-18 years old For Young Professionals: – 21-30 yrs old – [Preferably with job experience] Parents Consent [not applicable for RSS]; Caution to be taken for candidates coming from Rogationist Orphanages; Special caution to be taken for candidates born to families of difficult marital situation; At least with average IQ;

46 Personal Documents to be submitted (HS and College Students) Birth Certificate Baptismal Certificate Confirmation Certificate Parents Catholic/Civil Marriage Certificate (photocopy only) Letter of Parental Consent Form 137 (High School) [School to School Transaction] Form 138 (High School Card) Transcript of Records (for college students) Medical Certificate (plus Hepatitis B Vaccine, if possible) Recommendation Letters from Parish Priest and Bachelors Certificate Principals Recommendation Certificate of Good Moral Character ID Pictures (8 copies- 2x2 and 8 copies – 1x1) Lung X-Ray Barangay and Police Clearance

47 Personal Documents to be submitted (Professionals) Bio-data / Curriculum Vitae Birth Certificate Baptismal Certificate Confirmation Certificate Parents Catholic/Civil Marriage Certificate (photocopy only) Transcript of Records (for college students) Medical Certificate (plus Hepatitis B Vaccine, if possible) Recommendation Letters from Parish Priest ID Pictures (8 copies- 2x2 and 8 copies – 1x1) Lung X-Ray Barangay and Police Clearance Recommendation letter from recent schools, institutions, companies, affiliations) Authenticated single status from the National Statistic Office [CRS Form No. 4 (CENOMAR)]

48 The Superior with his Councilors will take extra caution in accepting candidates who are coming from other Seminaries or Religious Congregations. Possible exception will be regulated according to the indications given by the Congregation for the Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life and by the Rogationists Ratio Institutionis. For better accompaniment, some information from the former formators of the candidate may be obtained.

49 The candidates who are Firstborn, Only Child, and the Only Son, who are expected to be points of reference and hope of their families, must be taken into serious consideration for the problems arising during their formation.

50 I. We desire a Covenant relationship with our Church. Everything we ask of the Church we will offer in return. We ask for prayer and will pray in return for the Church. We seek wisdom and knowledge and will use those gifts in return to enrich our Church. Prayer is the first form of witness that awakens vocations. – Benedict XVI

51 II. As young people we seek answers to the many deep questions that dwell in the depths of our hearts. Please openly witness to your faith, by being available. Specifically, to you who live the consecrated life and serve as ordained ministers, offer us authentic joyful witnesses to your way of life, that we may experience the passion of your service. Invite us to share your excitement and deep love of Christ and the Church. Prayer is the first form of witness that awakens vocations. – Benedict XVI

52 III. We are one body in Christ: Inspire us with open dialogue, a dialogue where we will recognize our responsibility and accountability. Dialogue with us so that together we can work towards equality, healing the brokenness of sin and pain, and bring about authentic renewal. We are longing for honesty, respect and openness. Please recognize our gifts that we want to use in building with you, in consecrated life, a community of faith. Prayer is the first form of witness that awakens vocations. – Benedict XVI

53 IV. We request continued nurturing of our personal vocations as baptized Christians, inclusive of all vocations to the married, single, or religious life. Create discernment teams, in parishes and on college campuses, consisting of faith filled people who can support and nurture vocations. We invite the religious to share personal authentic stories with us, including their struggles and joys. We invite Spiritual Directors to share their skills, accept us unconditionally, offer us a safe place to seek answers and grow, and direct us towards a deeper spiritual life. Prayer is the first form of witness that awakens vocations. – Benedict XVI

54 IV. We request continued nurturing of our personal vocations as baptized Christians, inclusive of all vocations to the married, single, or religious life. Create discernment teams, in parishes and on college campuses, consisting of faith filled people who can support and nurture vocations. We invite the religious to share personal authentic stories with us, including their struggles and joys. We invite Spiritual Directors to share their skills, accept us unconditionally, offer us a safe place to seek answers and grow, and direct us towards a deeper spiritual life. Prayer is the first form of witness that awakens vocations. – Benedict XVI

55 "But the Lord said to me, Do not say, I am only a youth; for to all to whom I send you you shall go, and whatever I command you you shall speak. Be not afraid of them, for I am with you to deliver you says the Lord. Jeremiah 1:7-8 Prayer is the first form of witness that awakens vocations. – Benedict XVI

56 Educators, catechists, youth or campus ministers have an extremely important role in promoting vocations. The family is the seedbed of vocations, but without encouragement from those faithful working in the Church, the seeds planted may have difficulty taking root. They are in a unique position to see the potential in someone who may have a vocation to the priesthood or consecrated life or who may be considering service in lay ministry. They may be the one to help this individual, so loved by God, discern and decide wisely and prudently the path they should follow in life.

57 Concrete steps: Be clear about ones personal commitment to holiness; when others see Christ in us, they are drawn to a deeper relationship with the Lord. Recognize that this is Gods work and that we are cooperating with God in assisting others to follow His will. Look for ways to discuss what a vocation is with your students, youth or young adults in a practical and realistic way. If the parish, school or campus is lacking in vocation materials, contact the Vocation Office for information to assist your efforts.

58 Concrete steps: Develop a five point plan for helping those within the ministry discern their vocation through: 1. Prayer – develop a personal prayer life and one with your classroom or ministry; pray for an increase in vocations to the priesthood, consecrated life and lay ministry. 2. Evangelization – affirm and encourage Gospel principles in leadership, community, respect for life, and excellence in personal growth toward holiness. 3. Experience – ensure that activities promoted under your guidance reflect virtues and values that promote a Christian community of love, service and respect.

59 Concrete steps: Develop a five point plan for helping those within the ministry discern their vocation through: 4. Mentoring – witness to others your vocation and how you came to follow Gods will in your life. Be a role model for others. 5. Invitation – If you recognize in an individual the qualities and virtues that may indicate a vocation to the priesthood or religious life or to serve as a lay minister, do not hesitate to say: Have you ever thought about being a priest, or …? Invite students and youth to consider options for service and ministry in the parish or community.

60 Compassionate Heart of Jesus, graciously listen to our prayers. Give us generous hearts to respond to your call in our lives. Lift up courageous men and women willing to follow after your heart as priests, sisters, brothers, and deacons. Help parents and teachers to share the faith and to encourage young people to explore religious vocations. Guide all people, Lord, in your ways of compassion, truth, and peace, that we may find happiness in fulfilling our vocation. Amen.


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