Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Dr. Alan Seidman General & Self-Designed Specialization Coordinator Richard W. Riley College of Education & Leadership Walden University 155Fifth Avenue.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Dr. Alan Seidman General & Self-Designed Specialization Coordinator Richard W. Riley College of Education & Leadership Walden University 155Fifth Avenue."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dr. Alan Seidman General & Self-Designed Specialization Coordinator Richard W. Riley College of Education & Leadership Walden University 155Fifth Avenue South, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN © 2010 Seidman What We Know & Can Do To Improve College Student Retention

2 Visit: Journal of College Student Retention: Research Theory & Practice Retention References (over 1,700) Discussion Blog Issues Consulting Information for Companies Jobs/Conferences Affiliates Center for the Study of College Student Retention

3 Learn How To Really Help Students Persist Application of Current Theory & Practice to Local Problems Its Really All About The Teaching/Learning Process Its Also About Taking Action & Responsibility & Stop Just Talking About Retention Desired Outcomes

4 Why Worry About Retention? Obligation To Students Reasonable Expectation For Success Loss Of Time The Non-Renewable Resource 168 Hours Per Week Upgrading Of Skills For Job Advancement or Skills For Another Job Turned Off To Future Educational Opportunities Unhappy Students Tell Others Of Their Experience

5 Lost Tuition & Fees If tuition and fees are $5,000 per term If only 10 students leave after one term the loss per term is: - $50,000 per term or - $150,000 three terms - $350,000 for seven terms If 50 students leave after one term the loss per term is: - $250,000 per term or - $750,000 for three terms; - $1,750,000 for seven terms

6 Burden To Students & Parents Must Repay Any Loans Long time to repay May affect future borrowing May affect future credit rating

7 Undergraduate Student Aid, by Source Note: Nonfederal loans are not included here since they involve no subsidies of any kind. Source: The College Board

8 No debt Less than $10,000 $10,000 - $19,999 $20,000 - $29,999 $30,000 - $39,999 $40,000 or more Bachelor's34%14%19%15%9%10% Associate52%23%14%6%3%2% Certificate37%34%21%5%2%1% All undergraduates 41%20%18%11%6% Note: Figures reflect cumulative debt. They include U.S. citizens and residents and exclude PLUS Loans (which are taken out by parents), other loans from family and friends, and credit-card debt. Percentages are rounded and so may not add up to 100 percent. Source: College Board analysis of U.S. Department of Education data Distribution of Loan Debt Among Recipients of Undergraduate Degrees and Certificates, Many undergraduates leave college with no student-loan debt, but a small number graduate with significant bills totaling $40,000 or more. This chart shows the percentage of graduates who incurred debt in various ranges as of

9 Percentage growth since in average price for tuition, fees, room, and board, adjusted for inflation Source: College Board, Census Bureau

10 4-year public colleges4-year private colleges2-year public colleges ResidentCommuterOut of stateResidentCommuterResidentCommuter Tuition and fees$7,020 $18,548$26,273 $2,544 Room-and- board $8,193$7,969$8,193$9,363$8,163--$7,202 Books and supplies $1,122 $1,116 $1,098 Transportation$1,079$1,483$1,079$849$1,332--$1,445 Other$1,974$2,318$1,974$1,427$1,788--$1,996 Total*$19,388$19,912$30,916$39,028$38,672--$14,285 Note: These are enrollment-weighted averages. Weighted tuition and fees are derived by weighting the price charged by each institution in by the number of full-time undergraduates enrolled in ; room-and-board charges are weighted by the number of students residing on the campus. Estimates of other budget items are based on reports of institutional financial-aid offices. *Average total expenses include room-and-board costs for commuter students, which are average estimated living expenses for students living off the campus but not with parents. -- The sample is too small to provide meaningful information.. Source: The College Board Average College Costs,

11

12 GenderInstitutionStudent type TotalMaleFemale2-year4-yearUndergraduateGraduate Full-time students Percent employed45%42%49%53%43%45%48% Hours worked per week Less than 2016%13%18%14%16% 14% 20 to 3420%19%21%27%18%20%17% 35 or more9% 8%11%8% 16% Part-time students Percent employed79%78%81%75%84%78%90% Hours worked per week Less than 209%8%10% 8%10%* 20 to 3425%26%24%25%24%26%13% 35 or more44% 39%51%40%74% * Too few in survey for an accurate percentage Note: Percentages may not add up to totals because of rounding. The student population examined is between the ages of 16 and 24. A full-time student takes at least 12 hours of undergraduate courses or nine hours of graduate courses. Source: Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce Students and Employment, 2008

13 What We Know About College Student Retention

14 College is Cost Effective to Students Over Time

15 Unemployment Rates by Level of Education Less than high-school completion14.6%9.0%7.1% High school completion, no college 9.7%5.7%4.4% Some college, no degree 8.6%5.1%3.8% Associate degree 6.8%3.7%3.0% Bachelors degree or higher 4.6%2.6%2.0% Note: Figures are for people 25 years and older Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics The Chronicle of Higher Education, Almanac , p. 40.

16 Note: Figures include full- and part-time students. Numbers of graduate students include students pursuing professional degrees. Figures for private, two-year institutions are not shown separately but are included in totals shown. Figures are rounded. Source: Chronicle analysis of U.S. Department of Education data Enrollment Growth, : More Minorities, More Women

17 Note: Figures are based on fall enrollments. Source: U.S. Department of Education Undergraduate Enrollments by Type of College 10-year Growth,

18 United States: Estimate: 84.5 Percent, Margin of Error: +/-0.1 Percent Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Percent of People 25 Years and Over Who Have Completed High School (Includes Equivalency): 2008

19 United States: Estimate: 27.4 Percent, Margin of Error: +/-0.1 Percent Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Percent of People 25 Years and Over Who Have Completed a Bachelor's Degree: 2008

20 Student Pipeline from 9 th Grade to College Of th graders Graduate from HS on time Directly enter college Are still enrolled their 2 nd year Graduate within 150% % of population 25 or older with a bachelors degree or higher 2006* U.S Source: NCES: Common Core Data; IPEDS Residency and Migration, Fall Enrollment, and Graduation Rate Surveys *Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 American Community Survey

21

22 Academically Socially Student College Fit Source: Witt, P. H., Handal, P. J. (November 1984). Person-environment fit: Is satisfaction predicted by congruency, environment, or personality? Journal of College Student Personnel, 25, Pre College Selection Considerations

23 Academic Fit Low High Middle ChallengingChallenging But Easier Challenging But Difficult Some Extra TimeA Lot Of Extra Time Little Extra Time SAT/ACT/Assessment Range © 2008 Seidman

24 Social Fit A student fitting into the institution socially has been shown to be an important part of the retention equation. Social activities Clubs/special interest groups Athletic varsity/intramural activities How can commuter/on-line institutions promote college/student fit?

25 Academic & Social Fit College Characteristics or Environment are a reflection of the Institution set by administration/faculty/students Academic characteristics & standards Social characteristics & standards Community characteristics & standards State characteristics & standards

26

27 A Word About College Selectivity A College Is Only As Selective As The Number Of Applications It Receives For Example: Seidman University needs 1,000 new students each year to balance the budget ($) Seidman University needs to accept 2,000 new students each year to enroll 1,000 new students (Yield rate = 50%) Seidman University receives 10,000 applications and needs to accept 2,000 to yield 1,000 new students for a 20% acceptance rate. Seidman University is highly selective this year! Seidman University Old Main

28 Seidman University receives 4,000 applications and needs to accept 2,000 to yield 1,000 new students. The acceptance rate is now 50%. Seidman University Next Year

29 Distribution of Colleges by Acceptance Rates, Columns show the percentage of undergraduate institutions in each category that accept a certain proportion of applicants. PublicPrivateFor-profit Proportion of applicants accepted for admission4-year2-year4-year2-year4-year2-year Less than 10% accepted0.2%0.0%0.6%2.2%0.4%0.0% 10.0% to 24.9% accepted2.0%0.0%2.8%7.8%0.2% 25.0% to 49.9% accepted11.5%0.5%14.1%11.1%19.2%6.0% 50.0% to 74.9% accepted40.6%1.5%40.2%20.0%16.0%13.7% 75.0% to 89.9% accepted22.7%0.9%19.5%3.3%9.5%7.4% 90% or more accepted8.2%1.2%9.3%8.9%10.9%12.1% Institution has no application criteria14.9%96.0%13.5%46.7%43.7%60.6% Number of undergraduate institutions reporting application data 6091,0231, Note: Institutions include those enrolling first-time undergraduates seeking degrees or certificates. A small number of institutions did not report application information. Source: U.S. Department of Education

30 Total Men Women None14.13%15.3%13.1% 110.5%10.6%10.5% 213.3%13.5%13.2% 315.7%15.8%15.7% 413.3%13.2%13.4% 59.9%10.0%9.9% 67.1%6.8%7.5% 7 to %11.6%13.5% 11 or more3.3%3.1%3.5% College attended is student's: First choice60.7%61.3%60.2% Second choice25.9%25.3%26.4% Third choice8.7%8.8%8.6% Less than third choice4.7% Source: "The American Freshman: National Norms For Fall 2009," UCLA Higher Education Research Institute The Chronicle of Higher Education, Section: The Almanac, 57(1), 32. Additional Colleges Applied/Choice

31 What The Data Informs

32 Highest %Lowest %Current (2010) % Two-year public55.7 (10)51.3 (04)55.7 Two-year private72.6 (92)55.5 (08)58.6 BA/BS public70.0 (04)66.4 (96, 05)67.6 BA/BS private74.0 (89)68.7 (10)68.7 MA /MS public71.6 (06)67.3 (10)67.3 MA/MS private78.0 (85)71.4 (10)71.4 PhD public78.6 (10)72.9 (08)78.6 PhD private85.0 (85)80.3 (10)80.3 National66.7 Retention Trends: First to Second Year Source: ACT 2010 Retention/Completion Summary Tables

33 Highest %Lowest %Current (2010) % Two-year public 38.8 (89)25.5 (09)28.0 Two-year private 66.4 (90)50.2 (08)53.2 BA/BS public52.8 (86)39.6 (06, 10)39.6 BA/BS private57.5 (06)53.3 (01)55.1 MA/MS public46.7 (86)37.0 (00)39.0 MA/MS private58.4 (88)53.5 (01)54.4 PhD public50.6 (89, 90) 45.0 (01)47.8 PhD private68.8 (86)63.1 (05)64.7 Completion Rates Source: ACT 2010 Retention/Completion Summary Tables Completion of associates degree in 3years or less Completion of bachelors degree in 5 years or less

34 Admissions Selectivity Offering Bachelors Degrees Only Offering Bachelors and Masters Degree Only Offering Bachelors, Masters & Doctoral Degrees in 4yrs in 5yrs in 6yrsIn 4yrs in 5yrs in 6yrsin 4yrs in 5yrs in 6yrs Highly Select (act 25-30, sat ) Public Private Selective (act 21-26, sat ) Public Private Traditional (act 18-24, sat ) Public Private Liberal (act 17-22, sat ) Public Private Open (act 16-21, sat ) Public Private All Institutions Public Private Persistence to Degree Rates for Four-year Public & Private Colleges by Admission Selectivity Source: ACT National Collegiate Retention and Persistence to Degree Rates, 2010

35 Nationally After Six Years, 57 Out of 100 or 57% Graduated While 43 Out of 100 or 43% Did Not Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education. Almanac Issue (1), 10.

36 How Does American Higher Education Measure Up Internationally? Source: Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Data represent the percentage of adults with an associate's degree or higher in Wagner, A. (September 2006). Measuring up internationally: Developing Skills and Knowledge for the Global Knowledge Economy. The National Center for Public Policy and Higher EducationNational Center Report #06-7

37 How Does American Higher Education Measure Up Internationally? Source: Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Data represent the percentage of adults with an associate's degree or higher in Wagner, A. (September 2006). Measuring up internationally: Developing Skills and Knowledge for the Global Knowledge Economy. The National Center for Public Policy and Higher EducationNational Center Report #06-7

38 Various Risk Factors SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1999–2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000). Delayed Enrollment Part-time Attendance Financially Independent Have dependent children Single Parent No High School Diploma Work Full-time While Enrolled

39 Any risk factors Delayed enroll- ment Part- time attend- ance Finan- cially inde- pendent Have depend- ents or children Single parent No high school diploma Work full time while enrolled Average number of risk factors Total Gender Male Female Race/ethnicity White, non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic Hispanic* Asian American Indian/Alaska Native Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander Other *Priority was given to Hispanic ethnicity regardless of race chosen. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1999–2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000). Percentage of 1999–2000 undergraduates with various risk factors, and the average number of risk factors

40 The rigor of the high school curriculum is the strongest indicator of degree completion Enrolling by the January after high school graduation increases chances of degree completion Earning at least 20 credits at the end of the first year (4yr college) is important. Students who earned less only 22% earned a degree Earning more then 4 credits during the summer correlated positively to degree completion Switching majors did not influence degree completion 2 nd year important for students to catch up with first year lack of momentum 60% attended more than one college and 35% attended more then two Source: Hoover, E. (February 24, 2006). Study finds school-college disconnectin curriculum. The Chronicle of Higher Education, LII(25), 1, 37. What Matters In Student Retention: Student

41 60% attended more than one college and 35% attended more then two. How do you treat transfers? Or….how many of your students are taking mixed (blended) courses? On campus plus Off-campus your institution Off-campus another institution Internet course your campus Internet course another institution Above combinations such as on campus, off campus, internet How does this affect the student? Potential Risk Factor or Student Opportunity

42 Student involvement (integration, engagement) with the institution especially in the 1 st year Formal Informal Faculty Connections to past communities Classroom learning communities Residential learning communities Non-residential activities 2 yr vs. 4 yr Classroom practice/faculty actions in the classroom What Matters In Student Retention: College Source: Hoover, E. (February 24, 2006). Study finds school-college disconnect in curriculum. The Chronicle of Higher Education, LII(25), 1, 37. Academic & Social Systems

43

44 What We Know About Minority Student Retention

45 Commonalities: American Indian, African American, Hispanic Students (Negative) Lack of academic preparation Lack of a critical mass of students with similar ethnic characteristics Initial enthusiasm displayed by recruitment process but subsequent disappointment once enrolled Financial need

46 Commonalities: American Indian, African American, Hispanic Students (Positive) Mentor programs Financial Aid Groups and clubs for minority groups Summer pre college academic programs Multicultural centers Inclusive and meaningful curriculum

47 Lack of academic preparation Lack of a critical mass of students with similar characteristics Initial enthusiasm displayed by recruitment process but subsequent disappointment once enrolled Financial need Action Steps To Help Solve The Retention/Attrition Problem For Minority Students (pre College) Adopt a school district Provide teachers Provide mentors Visit families at home/bring to campus Provide aid ISSUESISSUES SOLUTIONSSOLUTIONS

48 What We Know About First Generation College Students

49 1 st Generation College Students 1971 to Present Source: Saenz, V.B., Hurtado, S., Barrera, D., Wolf, D., & Yeung, F. (2007). First in my family: a profile of first-generation college students at four-year institutions since Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA Due to increase in education levels in U.S. proportion of first-generation First-time full-time college students have declined African American decline is a concern since it is greater then the decline in education for African Americans in general Hispanics remain the least educated group, 69.1% lacked a college education in 2005 Hispanics have the highest proportion for first-generation college students at 4 year colleges (38.2%) Students of parents who did not attend college report that their parents encourage college attendance at a greater rate then their peers whose parents have a college education Worked 20+ hours per week in high school and 55% expect to get a job to help pay for college

50 1 st Generation College Students 1971 to Present Source: Saenz, V.B., Hurtado, S., Barrera, D., Wolf, D., & Yeung, F. (2007). First in my family: a profile of first-generation college students at four-year institutions since Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA More first-generation students considered financial factors as very important in their college choice considerations Considered close proximity of college to home (within 50 miles) a very important reason for choosing the college attended Less likely to live on campus Rely on advice of high school counselor and relative in deciding to attend a particular college A widening gap in self-ratings of high school math and writing ability with other students Lower educational aspirations Likely to choose to attend a private college for reasons of size and financial assistance

51 What We Tend Not To Pay Attention To

52 System: From the educational system Institutional: From a particular college Major: A specific discipline/program Course: A particular course Different Types of Student Departure Voluntary: A student leaves on his/her own Involuntary: A college lets a student go

53 Defining Retention/Attrition Define Retention/Attrition: Terminology Not Always The Same or Simple Attrition: a student who fails to reenroll at an institution in consecutive terms Dismissal: a student who is not permitted to continue enrollment by the institution Dropout: a student whose initial educational goal was to complete at least a bachelors degree but did not complete it Mortality: failure of a student to remain in college until graduation Persistence: the desire and action of a student to stay within the system of higher education from beginning through degree completion Retention: ability of an institution to retain a student from admission through graduation Stopout: a student who temporarily withdraws from an institution or system Withdrawal: departure of a student from a college campus Berger, J. B., & Lyons, S. (2005). Past to present: A historical look at retention. In Seidman, A. (Ed.). College student retention: Formula for student success. Praeger Press.

54 Definitions: So Whats in a Meaning? How do you define retention? Is it similar to how your peers define it? Who decides on the definition, local, state, federal, (one, two or all three)? Are they the same or different? Are they appropriate for your institution? Who judges if all colleges are complying with the definition? Are there exclusions? Can a college decide on its own definition?

55 How Do You Define Retention/Attrition On Your Campus? PROGRAM RETENTION: Tracks the full-time, first-time student in a degree program over time (6yrs/4yr college, 3yrs/2yr college) to determine whether the student has completed the program. COURSE RETENTION: The number of students enrolled in each credit course after the course census date and the number of students who successfully complete the course with an A-D grade at the end of the semester. COLLEGE SPECIFIC:. STUDENT RETENTION: If a student does not enroll for two consecutive regular semesters, determine whether the student has achieved his/her academic and/or personal goals. Defining Retention/Attrition © 1999 Seidman

56 A Few Retention Theories Astin's (1977, 1985) Theory of Involvement The more involved a student is with the college, the higher likelihood of student retention. Bean's (1980, 1983) Model of Work Turnover to Student Attrition Used concepts from organizational studies of worker turnover. Examines how organizational attributes and reward structures affect student satisfaction and persistence. Bean and Metzner's (1985) Nontraditional Student Attrition Environmental factors have a greater impact on departure decisions of adult students than academic variables. Kamens (1971, 1974) Used multi-institutional data to demonstrate how colleges of greater size and complexity had lower attrition rates. McNeely (1937) "College Student Mortality" Examined many factors in college student retention including time to degree, when attrition was most prevalent in a student's education, impact of college size etc. Spady Model (1971) Interaction between student characteristics and campus environment Summerskill (1962) Personality attributes of students is the main reasons for persistence and leaving. Tinto Model (1975, 1993) Academic and social integration with the formal and informal academic and social systems of a college. Most of these theories have been taken from: Berger, J. B., & Lyons, S. (2005). Past to present: A historical look at retention. In Seidman, A. (Ed.). College student retention: Formula for student success. Praeger Press. Braxton, J. M. & Hirschy, A. S.( 2005). Theoretical Developments in the study of college student departure. In Seidman, A. (Ed.). College student retention: Formula for student success. Praeger Press.

57 What We Can Do To Improve Retention & The Teaching Learning Process

58 Retention Questions for Action Statement of the ProblemWhat Problem Are You Trying To Solve? Define Retention/Attrition What Is Your Definition of Retention? Gather Data/BenchmarkCompare with Peers (are you satisfied with your results?) Know Your Students Know Your Student Profile Model for Your Interventions Tinto/Astin/Bean What Do You Plan to Do?See next slides How Do You Plan To Do It?Implementation Assign ResponsibilityWho is going to do what (Faculty, Student Affairs Staff, Institutional Research etc.) Evaluation Plan:Evaluate/Modify Where Necessary

59 Know Your Students What is the profile of a successful student on your campus? What is the profile of an unsuccessful student on your campus? What do you do when you accept and enroll a student with a profile of an unsuccessful student? What do you do with students with a successful student profile? Do you track changes in student behaviors both academically & personally over time?

60 Before You Can Take Action STOP YES Administrative Support Data Do You Have a Problem or Want to Take Action Retention Committee ReadingsDefinitions Examination of Services Plan of Action NO Do You Have? © 2008 Seidman

61 FOR INTERVENTION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES TO BE SUCCESSFUL THEY MUST BE POWERFUL ENOUGH TO EFFECT CHANGE *RET = E ID + ( E + IN + C ) IV * +(EARLY+INTENSIVE+CONTINUOUS) INTERVENTION *RETENTION=EARLY IDENTIFICATION +(EARLY+INTENSIVE+CONTINUOUS) INTERVENTION *©Seidman2001 A Retention Formula For Student Success

62 FOR INTERVENTION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES TO BE SUCCESSFUL THEY MUST BE POWERFUL ENOUGH TO EFFECT CHANGE CONTINUOUS) INTERVENTION *©Seidman2001 A Retention Formula For Student Success EARLY IDENTIFICATION (EARLY INTERVENTION INTENSIVE INTERVENTION

63

64 Faculty determine prerequisite (s) for each course Faculty determine competencies needed Faculty facilitates group work Student interactions Course benchmarks Course length Student involvement activities Course Prerequisite Its all about the teaching learning process and student readiness Competencies Needed Course (s) Next Level Course (s) ©Seidman, 2006 Seidman Student Success Model College Wide Services Academic Support Career Services Counseling Financial Aid Office Learning Lab Orientation Success Center

65 Over the net at student convenience On campus Pledge of authenticity Writing Reading Math Personal No Yes Student Assessment Student Competency Level Its all about the teaching learning process and student readiness Competency Help No YesOK Now At Level Stop Mandatory ©Seidman, 2006 Seidman Student Success Model College Wide Services Nationally Normed Assessment Mandatory Placement Faculty Assessment First Week of Class Determine Passing Competency Grade to Get Into College Level Course (s) Determine Number of Chances In Development Course Until Student Does Not Meet Ability to Benefit

66 Seidman Student Success Model Over the net at student convenience On campus Pledge of authenticity Writing Reading Math Personal Faculty determine prerequisite( s) for each course Faculty determine competencies needed No Yes Faculty facilitates group work Student interactions Course benchmarks Course length Student involvement activities Student Assessment Course Prerequisite Student Competency Level Its all about the teaching learning process and readiness Competency help Competencies Needed Courses Next Level Course No YesOK Now At Level Stop Mandatory ©Seidman, 2006

67 Seidman Student Success Formula Student In Need Of Assistance Prior To Enrollment Student Not In Need Diagnosis/ Prescription Assessment Monitor Evaluation/ Modify Program of Study Continue In Class Evaluation Program of Study Program Modification Retention = Early + ID (Early + Intensive + Continuous) Intervention ©Seidman, 2003 Facilitate Student Social Interaction Continue Orientation Activities Career Services Faculty Notes: The formula starts with the premise that the student comes first. The teaching learning process is essential for student academic and personal growth and development. The student enters the institution to acquire academic and personal skills necessary to achieve academic and personal goals. Assessment and interventions are a longitudinal process commencing at the time of acceptance and continuing throughout the students career at the institution and perhaps beyond. Although the formula appears to be for one term, it is, in essence for all terms a student is at the institution. Notes: The formula starts with the premise that the student comes first. The teaching learning process is essential for student academic and personal growth and development. The student enters the institution to acquire academic and personal skills necessary to achieve academic and personal goals. Assessment and interventions are a longitudinal process commencing at the time of acceptance and continuing throughout the students career at the institution and perhaps beyond. Although the formula appears to be for one term, it is, in essence for all terms a student is at the institution.

68 So, Does the Seidman Student Formula Work? Foothill College, CA Math My Way (MMW) Previous Math Sequence Math 250 (Arithmetic) Math 200 (Pre-Algebra) Math 101 (Beginning Algebra) Math 105 (Intermediate Algebra) New Math Sequence Math 230 (MMW: Arithmetic + Pre-Algebra) Math 101 (Beginning Algebra) Math 105 (Intermediate Algebra) Sources: Silverman, L. (2010). Academic Progress in Developmental Math Courses: A Comparative Study of Student Retention. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Walden University, Minneapolis: MN.

69 So, Does the Seidman Student Formula Work? Foothill College, CA Previous Math Sequence Math 250 (Arithmetic) 1 quarter to complete Faculty control pacing 5 hrs per week 35 to 1 student faculty ratio New Math Sequence Math 230 (MMW: Arithmetic + Pre-Algebra) 10 hierarchical & sequential modules Mastery Learning of Concepts Flexible pacing/student controlled 10 hrs per week 150 to 5 student faculty ratio Complete minimum 2 modules per term Peer tutors Spiral assessment: 100% assigns 87% per modules Sources: Silverman, L. (2010). Academic Progress in Developmental Math Courses: A Comparative Study of Student Retention. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Walden University, Minneapolis: MN.

70 So, Does the Seidman Student Formula Work? Foothill College, CA Math My Way (MMW) vs. Old Math Sequence MMW significantly higher program progression through math sequence MMW significantly higher math GPAs Possible Consequences: More basic skills students (minorities, women, non-traditional) complete academic requirements Began at 2nd grade level in math, college level in 2 yrs May increase career aspirations Appeared to turn more students on to math College increase revenue by keeping students meeting mission U.S. Census Bureau earnings: High school graduate $31,289 Associates$39,746 Bachelors$57,181 Sources: Silverman, L. (2010). Academic Progress in Developmental Math Courses: A Comparative Study of Student Retention. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Walden University, Minneapolis: MN.

71

72 A Word About … Developmental Courses Financial Aid Orientation Career Services Faculty Learning Resource Center/Library Leaning/College Communities College Mission

73 Developmental Courses Student usually placed in a developmental reading, writing, math course Placement based on past academic record and/or standardized placement test Sometimes pre-test at the beginning of the developmental course Sometimes post-test at the end of the developmental course Student must obtain a specific grade to continue into the next level course Regardless of skill needs student is enrolled in a full term course

74 College Community Developmental Course Support Does your assessment identify specific skills in need of remediation? Does your developmental course skills line up with the skills needed for the next level course? Can you divide the developmental course into modules and have a student only take the one (s) he/she needs? Developmental Courses Continued………..

75 Financial Aid Offices Second (probably first in many instances) contact with student, in writing, web, telephone, in person Many mailings to students Bring in a lot of revenue to the college Assist students ability to attend Contact with students during each term May have the most contact with students during college career except for professors Not given much status in the college community

76 Financial Aid Offices Continued………. College Community Financial Aid Office Support Acknowledge and support the job the FA office and staff performs Help develop message given students when contacted (differentiate between adult, distance learning, directly out of HS student) Know the amount of revenue a FA office brings into the college Provide the appropriate staff and funding to allow the FA office to do its job efficiently and effectively Acknowledge different types of students receive FA such as adults and distance learning students

77 Orientation Bring students together in a relaxed atmosphere/begin the bonding process to the college and students Start to acculturate students to the college Help families understand what their mother/father will experience in the college Acquaint students with administrative rules and regulations Help select and design academic programs Help students find information they need

78 College Community Orientation Support Faculty and staff serve as mentors Have orientation groups meet at least once per term Continuous all years in the college Orientation Continued……..

79 Career Services To receive FA a student must be in a degree program Are we making students choose programs too early in their college career Undecided students leave at a much greater rate then students with a defined goal Start the career exploration process early on and do not assume that a student knows what he/she wants to do simply since he/she chose a major. People change careers many times in their lifetime

80 Career Services Continued……. College Community Career Services Support Hold career exploration days Have career exploration part of orientation and/or on-going orientation Have career exploration built into the curriculum Use career exploration software Majors can have speakers talk about their careers Majors can hold informal student meetings

81 BENEFITS FOR ATTENDING YOUR COLLEGE? Study of the graduates: Jobs in field Salary Transfer What happens to those who do not graduate? Transfer Leave How do you measure your successes and failures? What do you do to help students succeed and how successful are your programs and services?

82 Learning Resource Center/Library Provides a place for students to go to study individually or in groups Help students find resource material Teaches students where to find material for projects Help faculty with research

83 Learning/Classroom Communities Learning Communities (in residence halls/commuter lounge Grouped by interest area Grouped by curriculum Grouped by courses Classroom Communities Groups within the classroom (group work) Outside of Class Communities Clubs Sports Keep in touch (teacher/learner) Web based classroom discussion Cafeteria/learning resource center

84 Faculty Faculty interaction with students outside the formal classroom setting is important for student success Encourage and promote faculty/student interaction Realize that faculty have competing interests: research, publishing, committees, etc. Value faculty involvement with students in the evaluation/promotion process.

85 Faculty continued……… College Community Faculty Support Faculty are not trained to be teachers, rather they are trained to be experts in their chosen field. They do not have to be certified, pass any tests and once they receive tenure are usually not observed by the administration for teaching effectiveness. Centers of Excellence: Teach Faculty Methods of Student Learning Value faculty involvement with students in the evaluation/promotion process.

86 college mission statement. FOR INTERVENTION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES TO BE SUCCESSFUL THEY MUST BE POWERFUL ENOUGH TO EFFECT CHANGE *RET = E ID + ( E + IN + C ) IV * +(EARLY+INTENSIVE+CONTINUOUS) INTERVENTION *RETENTION=EARLY IDENTIFICATION +(EARLY+INTENSIVE+CONTINUOUS) INTERVENTION *©Seidman2001 To Recap: Seidman Retention Formula For Student Success

87 Mission Statement Seidman Says: Be true to your mission. Do not just have it printed, have faculty and staff know it, and use it to guide the university in its interaction with students. Do not recruit students to your campus who will not be successful unless you are willing to provide programs and services to help overcome deficiencies. Philosophy does not have to follow finance. Finance should follow philosophy. Seidman Student Success Model Over the net at student convenience On campus Pledge of authenticity Writing Reading Math Personal Faculty determine prerequisite( s) for each course Faculty determine competencies needed No Yes Faculty facilitates group work Student interactions Course benchmarks Course length Student involvement activities Student Assessment Course Prerequisite Student Competency Level Its all about the teaching learning process and readiness Competency help Competencies Needed Courses Next Level Course No YesOK Now At Level Stop Mandatory ©Seidman, 2006

88

89 Dr. ALAN SEIDMAN General & Self-Designed Specialization Coordinator Richard W. Riley College of Education & Leadership Walden University 155Fifth Avenue South, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN Thank You Editor: Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice Author: College Student Retention: Formula for Student Success & Minority Student Retention: The Best of the Journal of College Student Retention


Download ppt "Dr. Alan Seidman General & Self-Designed Specialization Coordinator Richard W. Riley College of Education & Leadership Walden University 155Fifth Avenue."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google