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PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook The University of West Alabama Longenecker Moore Petty Palich © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. CHAPTER.

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Presentation on theme: "PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook The University of West Alabama Longenecker Moore Petty Palich © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. CHAPTER."— Presentation transcript:

1 PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook The University of West Alabama Longenecker Moore Petty Palich © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. CHAPTER 16 Promotional Planning Focusing on the Customer: Marketing Growth Strategies Part 4

2 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–2 Looking AHEAD 1.Describe the communication process and the factors determining a promotional mix. 2.Explain methods of determining the appropriate level of promotional expenditure. 3.Describe personal selling activities. 4.Identify advertising options for a small business. 5.Discuss the use of sales promotional tools. After you have read this chapter, you should be able to:

3 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–3 The Communication Process in Promotion Communication Process Components Sourcethe message sender Channelthe path the message travels Receiverthe recipient of the message Forms of Promotional Communication Nonpersonaladvertising Personalpersonal selling Special formssales promotion

4 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–4 Similarity of Personal and Small Business Communication Processes 16-1

5 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–5 Promotional Communications Promotional Mix A blend of nonpersonal, personal, and special forms for communication techniques aimed at a target market. Makeup of the mix is determined by: Geographical nature of target market Size of promotional budget Products characteristics

6 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–6 Determining the Promotional Budget How much should a small business spend on promotion? Allocating a percentage of sales Deciding how much can be spared Spending as much as the competition Determining what it takes to do the job

7 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–7 Four-Step Method for Determining a Promotional Budget 16-2

8 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–8 Proceed to develop promotion at WTDJ level Comparing Alternative Promotion Expense Estimates Compute WTDJ Is WTDJ equal to or less than others? Compute average of WTDJ, APS, WCS, and ACS Compare WCS with computed average Is WCS equal to or greater than average? Proceed to develop promotion at average level Seek additional funds to supplement promotion YES NO NOYES Key Terms: WTDJ: What it will take to do the job APS: A percentage of sales WCS: What can be spared ACS: As much as the competition spends START

9 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–9 Personal Selling in the Small Firm Personal Selling A sales presentation (promotion) delivered in a one- on-one manner. Requires: Product knowledge Well-prepared sales presentation Ability to build good will

10 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–10 Importance of Product Knowledge Salespersons use product knowledge to: Successfully educate customers about the products advantages, uses, and limitations. Answer customer questions and counter customer objections. Personal selling becomes order-taking when a salesperson lacks product knowledge.

11 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–11 The Sales Presentation: Prospecting Prospecting A systematic process of continually looking for new customers Prospecting Techniques Personal referrals Salesperson initiates customer contact through referral by another party known to the customer. Impersonal referrals Information on potential new customers developed from public records and published sources.

12 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–12 The Sales Presentation: Prospecting (contd) Prospecting Techniques (contd) Marketer-initiated contacts Market surveys are used to identify prospects Customer-initiated contacts Potential customers are identified through their contacts with the firm.

13 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–13 Practicing the Sales Presentation Improves the salespersons success rate. Prepares salesperson for objections related to price, product, timing, source, service, or need. Techniques for dealing with objections: Direct denial Indirect denial Boomerang technique Compensation method Pass-up method

14 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–14 Overcoming Customer Objections I had problems with a similar product before and dont want to go through that again! Im too busy. I like what you have said, but I need to wait. Yes, I understand your attitude, but have you considered... ? Thats why I want to explain how I can save you time by... Lets figure how much you can save by acting now. Your product sounds just like your competitors. There are similarities, but we have... at a better price. Im not sure I can risk a changeover to your product. Let me tell you how a competitor decided to buy from me.

15 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–15 Making the Sales Presentation Adapting the sales approach to the customers needs: Avoid a canned sales talk. Speak the customers language. Answer every objection explicitly and adequately. Be enthusiastic, friendly, and persistent. Be personally supportive of the customer.

16 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–16 Customer Goodwill and Relationship Selling Relationship Selling Building customer goodwill for future sales to satisfied customers through: Maintaining a good personal appearance. Having a pleasant personality. Using professional etiquette in customer contacts. Understanding the customers point of view. Maintaining ethical standards in the relationship.

17 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–17 The Compensation Program for Salespeople Nonfinancial Rewards Personal recognition of employees by the firm Plaques and Employee of the Month awards Providing perks to superior performers. Personal satisfaction drawn by salespersons from doing their work well.

18 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–18 Compensating Salespeople Financial Rewards Commissions Compensation paid as percentage of sales productivity. Strong sales motivator Straight salary Compensation paid regardless of sales made. Combination of commissions and salary Balance of two compensation forms is adjusted to provide an increasing proportion of commission as salesperson gains experience.

19 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–19 Advertising Practices for Small Firms Advertising The impersonal presentation of a business idea through mass media. Advertising Objectives To sell by informing, persuading, and reminding. To serve as a complement to product quality and efficient service. To properly reflect changes in customer needs and preferences.

20 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–20 Types of Advertising Product Advertising The presentation of a business idea designed to make potential customers aware of a specific product or service and create a desire for it. Institutional Advertising The presentation of information about a particular firm, designed to enhance the firms image.

21 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–21 Obtaining Assistance with Advertising Advertising Agencies Furnish design, artwork, and copy for ads Evaluate/recommend media with pulling power Evaluate the effectiveness of advertising appeals Advise on promotion and merchandise displays Conduct market sampling studies Furnish mailing lists Other Sources Suppliers Trade Associations

22 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–22 Advertising Decision Factors Frequency of Advertising With regularity for effectiveness and continuity Introduction of new uses for established products Introduction of new products and services Where to Advertise Appropriate media mix determined by: Geographical area for target market coverage Customer type targeted by advertising campaign Advertising media customarily used by industry Type of business Web advertising on the World Wide Web (Internet)

23 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–23 Advantages and Disadvantages of Major Advertising Media 16-3 Source: Charles W. Lamb, Jr., Joseph F. Hair, Jr., and Carl McDaniel, Marketing, 9th ed. (Cincinnati: South-Western, 2008), p. 475.

24 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–24 Web Advertising Basic Web Promotions Banner ads Advertisements that appear across a Web page, often as moving rectangular strips Pop-up ads Advertisements that burst open on computer screens Direct promotion Advertising delivered by means of electronic mail Spam: unsolicited

25 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–25 Web Advertising (contd) Basic Web Promotions (contd) Web sponsorships A type of advertising in which the firm pays another organization for the right to be part of that organizations Web page. Linkages One firm pays another to include a click-on (click- through) advertising link on its Web site. A corporate Web site on the Internet Creating and registering a site name Building a user-friendly Web site Promoting the Web site

26 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–26 Website Design Tips 16-4 Tip 1: Make It Easy to Buy Tip 2: Make a Strong First Impression Tip 3: Minimize Distractions: Advertising Isnt Always Necessary Tip 4: Make It Personal Tip 5: Avoid Long Instructions Tip 6: Provide Visual Clues to Location Tip 7: Show Off Products Tip 8: Encourage Spontaneous Purchases Tip 9: Alternate Background Colors in Long Lists Tip 10: Allow Users to Collect Items Source: Nadja Vol Ochs, Easy-to-Buy E-Commerce Site Design Tips, accessed July 13, 2007.

27 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–27 Options for Getting Your Website Listed in Search Engines Use a Free Submission Service 2.Use a Low-Cost, Automated Submission Service 3.Do It Yourself by Manually Submitting Your Website to Individual Search Engines 4.Use a Professional Search Engine Consultant 5.Use Submission Software Source: Adapted from the Internet Marketing Centers website, accessed July 13, 2007.

28 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–28 Sales Promotional Tools Sales Promotion An inclusive term for any promotional techniques that are neither personal selling or advertising Used in combination with personal selling and advertising. Specialties Tangible and enduring functional items of worth distributed personally to recipients that serve as reminders of the firm. Pens, key chains, magnets, and clothing imprinted with the name, logo, or slogan of the firm.

29 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–29 Sales Promotion Tools (contd) Trade Show Exhibits Provide hands-on experience with products. Are less costly than personal selling. Making Trade Show Exhibits Effective Check out the trade shows history. Prepare a professional-looking display. Have a sufficient quantity of literature on hand. Make sure you have a good product. Do pre-show promotion. Have a giveaway or gimmick. Train booth personnel. Follow up!

30 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–30 Sales Promotion Tools (contd) Publicity Information about a firm and its products or services that appears as a news item, usually free of charge. Provides visibility for the firm Requires regular contacts with the news media

31 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–31 Sales Promotion Tools (contd) When to Use Sales Promotion For manufacturers To stimulate channel membersretailers and wholesalersto market a firms products. For wholesalers To induce retailers to buy inventories earlier than they normally would. For retailers To persuade customers to make a purchase. Strategic Alliances and Sales Promotion Joining with another firm to promote products by sharing marketing resources and customers

32 © 2008 Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.16–32 Key TERMS promotion promotional mix personal selling prospecting advertising product advertising institutional advertising banner ads pop-up ads promotion Web sponsorship linkage sales promotion publicity


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