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Academic Promotion for Clinician-Educators

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1 Academic Promotion for Clinician-Educators
Paul A. Hemmer, Col, USAF, MC Professor of Medicine Vice Chairman for Educational Programs Uniformed Services University July 2010

2 Acknowledgements, etc. Louis Pangaro, MD
Professor and Chairman, DOM Academic Medicine September, 2000

3 Goals Define Clinician-Educators (CE) National trends
USU model for CE promotion Scholarship for CE Clinical “prefix” vs. “non-prefixed” appoint Summary

4 USU Model for CEs Review of USU 1100
Tracks (Tenure, Non-tenure) Expectations Scholarship, Teaching, Prof Service, Citizenship Pathways/Ranks/Clinical Prefix Promotion Criteria Process for Appointment and Promotion What You Should Do

5 Bottom Line Up Front (BLUF)

6 Moving from Asst to Assoc Prof Clinician-Educator, Non-Prefixed, Non-Tenure
Supporting Basics Scholarship Documentation of Teaching Roles List of work/products Pubs, Materials Letters 2 internal (DOM) 1-2 External Portfolios Teaching Level 2 Application Diligence/excellence in pt care Prof Service Institution/broader Citizenship > 4yrs clinical teaching Excellence Teacher Innovation, Reputation “beyond Institution”

7 Moving from Associate to Professor Clinician-Educator, Non-Prefixed, Non-Tenure
Supporting Basics Scholarship Documentation of Teaching Roles List of work/products Pubs, Materials Letters 5 letters Portfolios “Outstanding achievement” in Teaching (Level 3) and Application Dissemination of work Close review of writings and professional communication Evidence of community impact > 3 yrs as Associate Substantial contribution (papers, texts) Broad Reputation (nat’l/int’l) Recognition (editorial positions, visiting prof)

8 Moving from Asst to Clinical Assoc Clinician-Educator, Prefixed, Non-Tenure*
Basics Supporting Letter from USU Chair, explaining and supporting request Faculty member’s CV (should highlight excellence as teacher and clinician) Letter of support (1) from faculty member of senior academic rank in applicant’s specialty Endorsement by faculty member’s Commanding Officer > 6yrs clinical teaching Role model for peers Excellence Teacher Excellence Clinical Care Teaching EXCEEDS routine contributions to USU educational programs Admin accomplishments (if part of usual job) Institutional recognition as clinician and clinical teacher *Requires: CAPT Chair/subcomm concurrence; Dean’s endorsement; BOR review; USU President action

9 Moving from Assoc to Clinical Professor Clinician-Educator, Prefixed, Non-Tenure*
Basics Supporting > 10yrs as Asst and/or Assoc Service-wide or National recognition as clinician and clinical teacher Excellence Teacher Excellence Clinical Care Teaching EXCEEDS routine contributions to USU educational programs Admin accomplishments (if part of usual job) Letter from USU Chair, explaining and supporting request Faculty member’s CV (should highlight excellence as teacher and clinician) Letter of support (1) from faculty member of senior academic rank in applicant’s specialty Endorsement by faculty member’s Commanding Officer *Requires: CAPT Chair/subcomm concurrence; Dean’s endorsement; BOR review; USU President action

10 Faculty Tracks Tenure: civilian, full-time
Non-tenure: uniformed, some civilian

11 Pathways in Non-tenure Track
Clinician-Investigator Education, Research, Clinical, Prof service Clinician-Educator Education, Clinical, Professional service Research prefix: focus = science Clinical prefix: focus = clinical teaching and clinical practice Tenure ineligible only

12 USU Expectations Qualifications for Faculty Membership
Scholarship Peer Review Teaching Professional Service Institutional Citizenship

13 Scholarship (Boyer) Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities for the Professorship, Carnegie Foundation, 1990. Discovery (original, disciplined research) Integration (innovative thinking which combines and connects various disciplines) Teaching (communicates understanding) Application (engagement with society, building bridges between theory and practice) Application: how knowledge can be used in a practical situation Aspects of scholarship are not mutually exclusive and there is overlap. Teaching and Application are the scholarship domains emphasized for non-prefixed appointments for Clinician-Educators

14 Schulman L. The Scholarship of Teaching. Change. 1999;31(5):11.
Elusiveness of Scholarship of Teaching Glassick CE. Acad Med. 2000;75: To be scholarship, work (teaching) must: Be made public Be available for peer review and critique according to accepted standards Be able to be reproduced and built on by other scholars Schulman L. The Scholarship of Teaching. Change. 1999;31(5):11.

15 Scholarship in Teaching Fincher R. et.al. Acad Med. 2000;75:887-94.
“Teaching…can be scholarly if appropriate evidence is presented to show that defined standards have been met.” Products: Web-based materials, textbook publications, curriculum units or teaching modules, CME presentations, curricular change, community education Challenge: provide the evidence

16 Scholarship of Application Shapiro ED, Coleman DL. Acad Med
Application of clinical expertise alone does not constitute scholarship; it does when Systematically assess effectiveness of techniques Communicate it to allow others to benefit Service is scholarship when Assess pt satisfaction and communicate it Common Aspect of Scholarship of Application Dissemination of useful, testable, reproducible information to others

17 Peer Recognition of Scholarly Activity (1)
Original manuscripts, review articles, case reports, books, chapters Principal authorship or significant contribution to position papers, field manuals, practice guidelines Patent applications Acquisition of external funding 1100:7.2.1

18 Peer Recognition of Scholarly Activity (2)
Invited presentations (meetings, other institutions) Institutional utilization of educational materials Service on study sections, research review boards, editorial boards, reviewer 1100:7.2.1

19 Peer Recognition of Scholarly Activity (3)
Election to learned societies, organizational awards Selection as military specialty consultant Selection as teaching chief, residency director, educational director 1100:7.2.1

20 Expectations Qualifications for Faculty Membership
Scholarship Peer Review Teaching Professional Service Institutional Citizenship

21 Teaching Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 1100:7.3
Individual Classroom, Departmental Level 2 Institutional Teaching, USUHS as a whole Grand rounds at other institutions, regional CME, new curriculum, course/residency director Level 3 Disseminated, well-recognized Beyond parent institution Publications, grants, visiting scholar, national educational activities (RRC, re-certification) 1100:7.3

22 Level 1 Teaching Department teaching involving:
Presenting series of lectures, one or more topics Primary instructor in a course Advising students Attending or precepting on inpatient or outpatient Mentoring students and fellows Seminar or journal club organizer Small group or laboratory teacher Coverage of specified curriculum content and of the standard teaching load of the department Meritorious teaching evals from students/ peers

23 Level 2 Teaching Moving to Associate Professor
Development/redevelopment of teaching materials for students, continuing education courses and/or faculty Writing clinical case material for teaching Invitation to present Grand Rounds/seminars at primary departments and other institutions Invitations to present courses outside of primary dept Written documentation of novel techniques in teaching on the delivery of care Leadership roles in teaching (course director, residency or fellowship director)

24 Level 2 Teaching (2) Moving to Associate Professor
Consistently receives outstanding teaching evaluations or teaching awards, recognition as outstanding role model for students Develops innovative teaching methods Software, video, packaged courses, or workshops Provides continuing educ at local, national meetings Develops new educational materials Successfully runs regional continuing education Creates a new course or curriculum

25 Level 3 Teaching Moving to Professor
Favorable peer reviews or significant adoptions of innovative published or circulated instructional materials Strong record of publications in health prof education Evidence of systematic experimentation on, or scholarly analysis and evaluation of, alternative and innovative teaching approaches or materials Peer reviewed grant funding. Provides educational leadership by writing syllabi, textbooks, or assuming an institutional level policy making administrative role.

26 Level 3 Teaching (2) Moving to Professor
Consistent participation in national educational activities Invitations to be a visiting scholar at another institution. Established reputation beyond the institution as an innovative educator External letters of reference Invitations to lecture or demonstrate at national conferences on teaching Organizing national meetings National consultant on editorial boards of journals Serve on national or international committees on teaching, curriculum, or evaluation.

27 Teaching and Clinical Prefix Clinician-Educators
Documented excellence in teaching E.g., learner evaluations, teaching awards Must achieve Level 1 consistently Teaching must exceed “routine” contribution Academic promotion--recognition Clinical Assoc: Institutional (~Level 2) Clinical Prof: Service-wide/National (~Level 3)

28 Expectations Qualifications for Faculty Membership
Scholarship Peer Review Teaching Professional Service Institutional Citizenship

29 Common Aspect of Scholarship of Application
Professional Service Scholarship of Application Service to uniformed service, fed depts Professional, Educational, Scientific, or community organizations at local, state, national, or international levels Common Aspect of Scholarship of Application Dissemination of useful, testable, reproducible information to others

30 Institutional Citizenship
Administrative, committee involvement

31 Faculty Ranks, Promotion
Clinician-Educators

32 *Prefixed (“clinical”) or non-prefixed
Faculty Ranks Teaching Fellow Instructor Assistant Professor Associate Professor* Professor* *Prefixed (“clinical”) or non-prefixed

33 Ward supervision of Students Recommendation of Chief Brief CV
“Teaching Fellow” Residents: PGY 2, 3 Ward supervision of Students Recommendation of Chief Brief CV 33

34 Instructor Fellows* Teaching in Clinic, Consult Service, or Physical Diagnosis Recommendation of Chief or Service Chief CV *not GIM fellows 34

35 *There is no “Clinical” prefix for Asst Prof
Assistant Professor* Full-time staff physicians (including GIM Fellows and “Chief Residents”) Active participation in core teaching: Precepting, attending on general medicine ward, student in clinic, ICMs Recommendation of local Chief of Med Structured CV *There is no “Clinical” prefix for Asst Prof

36 Appointment Process Assistant Professor
Physician Discusses with Hospital Chief Preparation of CV Recommendation to Chair, DOM, USUHS by Hospital Chief , or Recommendation by USUHS Clerkship/Course Director Approval by Hospital Commander Chair submits to Dean

37 Associate Professor of Medicine (Non-Tenure, Non-Prefixed, Clin-Ed)
Criteria for assistant professor PLUS Sustained involvement in clinical teaching (> 4 years, 6-7 typical) Documented excellence as teacher Innovation, reputation in education “…evidence of an established reputation beyond the parent institution”

38 Associate Professor of Medicine (Non-Tenure, Non-Prefixed, Clin-Ed)
Scholarship of Teaching: “Level Two”, extra-mural: Grand rounds at other institutions, regional CME, new curriculum, course/residency director Scholarship of Application: diligence and excellence in patient care - clinical knowledge and humanistic skills should be described in supporting letters

39 Associate Professor of Medicine (Non-Tenure, Non-Prefixed, Clin-Ed)
Professional service: institution and broader Institutional Citizenship Leadership of or major contributions to SOM and/or their hospital committees

40 Professor (Non-Tenure, Non-Prefixed, Clin-Ed)
“Outstanding achievement in the two areas of scholarship” “Dissemination of their work through a close evaluation of their professional writings and other forms of professional communication…evidence of ‘community’ impact”

41 Professor (Non-Tenure, Non-Prefixed, Clin-Ed)
Criteria for associate professor PLUS Greater contribution to field (papers, texts) Letters (non-tenure 5; tenure 6) International reputation Recognition (editorial positions, visiting professorships)

42 “Clinical” Prefix: Appointments
Non-tenure, Clinician-Educator

43 “Clinical” Prefix and Clinician-Educator Pathway
NOTE: “Clinical” prefix is NOT synonymous with “Clinician” in Clinician-Educator In the CE pathway, there may be faculty with: Non-prefixed appts (Associate Professor) Prefixed appts (Clinical Associate Professor)

44 “Clinical” Prefix May be used by USU Chair for Assoc, Prof
Tenure ineligible faculty only Primary contributions Clinical teaching Clinical practice, or Clinical administration Appts and promotion to be judged based on achievements and recognition in teaching, clinical practice and clinical administration

45 Clinical Assoc Professor of Med (Non-Tenure, Clinician-Educ)
Criteria for assistant professor PLUS > 6yrs clinical teaching Serves as professional role model for peers Excellence as a Teacher Excellence in Clinical Care Teaching EXCEEDS routine contributions to USU educational programs Admin accomplishments (if part of usual job) Institutional recognition as clinician and clinical teacher

46 Clinical Professor of Medicine (Non-Tenure, Clinician-Educ)
Criteria for Clinical Associate Prof PLUS At least 10 yrs in rank as an assistant and/or associate professor Service-wide or National recognition as a clinician and clinical teacher

47 Non-tenure, Clinician-Educator
Academic Promotion Non-tenure, Clinician-Educator

48 Promotion Process Associate Professor and Professor
Initiation (individual or dept review) DOM Executive Committee Review Productivity, time in grade Candidate’s Responsibility References and personal statement Chair’s Responsibility Collate for CAPT, Board of Regents

49 Supporting Materials (1)
Documentation of teaching roles quantity quality “level” (designing and planning) [i.e., Engagement with community] List of written work, products publications curricular materials

50 Supporting Materials (2)
Letters of Support Assoc: internal (2) and external (1-2) Prof: internal (2) and external (5) Letters MUST be from individuals at/above rank to which applying Portfolios teaching (critiques, awards) documents of mentoring (abstracts) curricular materials

51 Academic Promotion: Clinical Prefix
Non-tenure, Clinician-Educator

52 Clinical Associate or Professor Academic Promotion
Letter from USU Chair explaining and supporting the request Faculty member’s CV Letter of support (1) from faculty member of senior academic rank in applicant’s specialty Endorsement by member’s Commanding Officer or designee Concurrence by CAPT Chair or subcommittee, Dean’s endorsement, Board of Regents review/recommendation

53 Other Documents and Information
For non-prefixed and prefixed appointments

54 *Important for non-prefixed appointments
Teaching Portfolio Awards and citations Recommendations for awards Educational products, materials* Clinical projects - what role did you play?* Copies of articles, abstracts* 1100:7.3.1 *Important for non-prefixed appointments

55 *Important for non-prefixed appointments
Teaching Portfolio (2) Critiques of teaching (peer and student) Courses taught, curricular materials Electronic teaching materials/simulations* Individuals mentored 1100:7.3.1 *Important for non-prefixed appointments

56 USUHS DOM Faculty Review
Every other yr review by exec committee Annually for “outside NCA” sites Teaching (activity sheet, student/resident critiques) CV—awards, recognition, scholarship Service Contribution (school and hospital committees) 56

57 Steps You Can Take Look at the APT document (1100)
Choose a Track/Pathway Find Area for Productivity (YOUR strengths, interests) Find a Mentor: USUHS Website: Faculty, Faculty Mentoring Pick projects, collaborators Allocate time (e.g., 1/2 day twice a month) This may be “after hours”

58 What Else Should You Do? Keep a Portfolio (Document EVERYTHING)
Seek Responsibility institutional national organizations Engage in activities that support your track Eg., Clinical supervision PIM with ABIM MOC IF YOU LEAVE “CORE” USU facility Get LOCAL med school faculty appointment

59 Organize Your CV Keep current (and dated) Keep headings clear
Group your activities Separate publications by type Delete “old” abstracts? Don’t list your CME!

60 CV Do not mix abstracts, presentations, and publications—keep in separate sections Publications—organize them Peer reviewed Non-peer reviewed (e.g., commentaries) Invited

61 Moving from Asst to Assoc Prof Clinician-Educator, Non-Tenure
Supporting Basics Scholarship Documentation of Teaching Roles List of work/products Pubs, Materials Letters 2 internal (DOM) 1-2 External Portfolios Teaching Level 2 Application Diligence/excellence in pt care Prof Service Institution/broader Citizenship > 4yrs clinical teaching Excellence Teacher Innovation, Reputation “beyond Institution”

62 Moving from Associate to Professor Clinician-Educator, Non-Tenure
Supporting Basics Scholarship Documentation of Teaching Roles List of work/products Pubs, Materials Letters 5 letters Portfolios “Outstanding achievement” in Teaching (Level 3) and Application Dissemination of work Close review of writings and professional communication Evidence of community impact > 3 yrs as Associate Substantial contribution (papers, texts) International Reputation Recognition (editorial positions, visiting prof)

63 Moving from Asst to Clinical Assoc Clinician-Educator, Prefixed, Non-Tenure*
Basics Supporting Letter from USU Chair, explaining and supporting request Faculty member’s CV (should highlight excellence as teacher and clinician) Letter of support (1) from faculty member of senior academic rank in applicant’s specialty Endorsement by faculty member’s Commanding Officer > 6yrs clinical teaching Role model for peers Excellence Teacher Excellence Clinical Care Teaching EXCEEDS routine contributions to USU educational programs Admin accomplishments (if part of usual job) Institutional recognition as clinician and clinical teacher *Requires: CAPT Chair/subcomm concurrence; Dean’s endorsement; BOR review; USU President action

64 Moving from Assoc to Clinical Professor Clinician-Educator, Prefixed, Non-Tenure*
Basics Supporting > 10yrs as Asst and/or Assoc Service-wide or National recognition as clinician and clinical teacher Excellence Teacher Excellence Clinical Care Teaching EXCEEDS routine contributions to USU educational programs Admin accomplishments (if part of usual job) Letter from USU Chair, explaining and supporting request Faculty member’s CV (should highlight excellence as teacher and clinician) Letter of support (1) from faculty member of senior academic rank in applicant’s specialty Endorsement by faculty member’s Commanding Officer *Requires: CAPT Chair/subcomm concurrence; Dean’s endorsement; BOR review; USU President action

65 Other information from 1100 document

66 Pathways Clinician-Investigator
“In addition to documentation of research activities, individuals in this pathway must be an integral component of the department’s clinical and teaching programs.” 1100:5.5.1 66

67 Pathways Clinician-Educator
“…must be an integral component of the department’s clinical and teaching programs…encouraged to assume administrative responsibility for medical education and related clinical are activities…” 1100:5.5.2 67

68 Level 1 Teaching “Ability to provide the effective transfer of knowledge and/or skills to medical, graduate, postdoctoral students, postgraduate physician trainees, faculty, other members of the scientific and medical community and the general public” “Ability to show students how to think critically and purposefully, broaden the students areas of interests, and most importantly encourage and help develop the skills for self-learning” Department teaching involving: Presenting series of lectures covering one or more topics Primary instructor in a course, advising students, attending or precepting on inpatient or outpatient service,mentoring students and fellows, seminar or journal club organizer, small group or laboratory teacher Coverage of specified curriculum content and of the standard teaching load of the department Meritorious teaching evaluations from students and peers

69 Level 2 Teaching Development/redevelopment of teaching materials for students, continuing education courses and/or faculty training Writing clinical case material for teaching Successful supervision of postgrad students and willingness to supervise major honors postgrad research projects Invitation to present Grand Rounds/seminars at primary departments and other institutions Invitations to present courses outside of primary dept Written documentation of novel techniques in teaching on the delivery of care Leadership roles in teaching (course director, residency or fellowship director)

70 Level 2 Teaching (2) Consistently receives outstanding teaching evaluations or teaching awards, recognition as outstanding role model for students Develops innovative teaching methods such as educational software, videotapes, packaged courses, or workshops Provides continuing education at local and national meetings Develops new educational materials Successfully runs regional continuing education courses Creates a new course or curriculum

71 Level 3 Teaching Receives favorable peer reviews or significant adoptions of innovative published or circulated instructional material. A strong record of publications in health professional education including but not limited to methodology, outcome assessment, competency, and curriculum reform. Evidence of systematic experimentation on, or scholarly analysis and evaluation of alternative and innovative teaching approaches or materials, such as the development of inclusive curricula. Peer reviewed grant funding. Provides educational leadership by writing syllabi, textbooks, or assuming an institutional level policy making administrative role.

72 Level 3 Teaching (3) Consistent participation in national educational activities (e.g., Residency Review Committee, programs sponsored by professional organizations, re-certification, workshops and symposia). Invitations to be a visiting scholar at another institution. An established reputation beyond the institution as an innovative educator as evidenced by external letters of reference and invitations to lecture or demonstrate at national conferences on teaching, organizing national meetings, serving as a national consultant, on editorial boards of journals or to serve on national or international committees on teaching, curriculum, or evaluation.

73 Level 3 Teaching Moving to Professor
Evidence of peer review and acceptance of new or integrated knowledge through the dissemination of the results Publishes articles on health professional education with emphasis on hypothesis-driven research Develops educational material in media other than print (video, computer programs, Internet) that demonstrate expanded peer recognition through utilization by institutions, educators, and clinicians outside of the USUHS.

74 Tenure Criteria Scholarship Contributions
publications, expertise, reputation grants Contributions teaching service USU is typical in tenure rules

75 Associate Professor of Medicine (Tenure)
“…will have demonstrated the clear capacity for sustained achievement and productivity in three of the four areas of scholarship.” “…evidence of an established reputation beyond the parent institution within the discipline...area...specialty”

76 Associate Professor (Tenure)
criteria for assistant professor PLUS sustained productivity as a scholar (papers, grants) over several years (4 - 8yrs.) national reputation supporting letters (tenure > 4) personal letter on theme of scholarly work

77 Research Portfolio papers, abstracts
your contribution (if not first author) grant proposals ratings if unfunded documentation of reviewer, directorial status

78 Selected References/Articles

79 Promotion Criteria for CEs JGIM 2003;18:711-716
Survey of DOM Chairs; 82% response What do Chairs emphasize for CEs? Teaching Skills (awards, trainee evals) Clinical Skills (peer/trainee evals) Agrees with Promotion Cte Chairs* Expected publications: 5 “Make it count twice”--Levinson For the expected publications, this is half what is expected of CIs (10) and 35% of dept chairs said no minimal expectation for # publications In general, teaching awards felt to be important and of high quality in making promotion decisions, but no one is happy with the available methods of assessing performance in these domains (peer evals, trainee evals, pt satisfaction, outcomes of clinical practice) *Beasley BW, Wright SW. JAMA 1997;278:723-28 79

80 Promotion Criteria for CEs: DOM Chair recommendations
Document/track ALL activities Achieve reputation for excellence Publish all scholarly activity Mentor: set and meet goals Develop area of expertise Be involved in research Get involved in promotion process Develop curricula or other educ projects

81 Looking Forward to Promotion Prospective Study of Promotion in Academia JGIM 2003;18:705-10
183 assistant professors in DOMs 58% CEs, 34% CIs 75% CEs felt had to produce research Seen written promotion criteria 51% CE, 72% CI CIs met regularly with Division chiefs > 10% protected time for scholarship 37% CE, 79% CI

82 Looking Forward to Promotion What Matters?
CE views Clinical Research Written Scholarship Reputation Teaching Skills Curric Development Chairs of CAPT views Teaching skills Clinical Skills Mentoring Coord Programs Reputation Why the Differences? CE: don’t know criteria? CAPT Chairs: politically correct?

83 Looking Forward to Promotion Recommendations
Teaching portfolio Any/all data related to teaching Effectiveness as a clinician Know what is expected for promotion Mentors Meet with division chief every 6 months Create environment for scholarship

84 A Time to be Promoted Prospective Study of Promotion in Academia Beasley B, et.al. JGIM ; 21:123-9. Follow-up of 185 CEs Median time to Associate Prof: 6.0 yrs CIs: 62% promoted at 6 yrs in rank (Asst) CEs: 42% promoted at 6 yrs in rank (Asst) Factors NOT associated with promotion Gender, race, marital status US News Medical school ranking AOA, size of med school faculty, secretarial support, statistical support, research in med school

85 Cox proportional hazard model
Variables Independently Associated with Promotion JGIM ; 21:123-9. Negative Positive % Research < 5% FTE Manuscript review service available Never meeting with Chair/Chief re: promotion Lower 1/3 job satisf Being from Northeast (Midwest “protective”) $ k pay range Working > 60 hr/wk Career mentor Having grant office available Cox proportional hazard model

86 Integration of Clinician-Educators Levinson W, et. al. Acad Med
Problems with current recognition system Reg/natl reputation requirement is unfair Lack of valid measures of teaching/pt care Lack of training opportunities Solutions Clinician-Educator Researcher Pathway Drop reputation and publication requirement Wendy Levinson and Arthur Rubenstein discuss what is wrong with current promotion process for Ces and propose changes. Basically, feel the requirement for regional and national reputation is simply wrong—it overlooks the vast amount of work outstanding scholars do locally (and CE, if they are really good at what they are hired to do, are nearly overwhelmed with the responsibilities of clinical work and education to also have the time to document and publish/disseminate their scholarship). We lack valid measures of teaching and clinical care (Me: this might be why there is focus on what we can measure—reputation—right now. CE often do not have the training to be able to accomplish traditional scholarship (design studies, time to conduct/analyze studies) CER pathway: 1) advanced master’s level or PhD level training in education; 2) Acad med centers need to support them, giving them 75% time to work on educational research, build reputation, pursue scholarship of discovery; 3) local, regional, federal funding

87 Advancing educators and education by defining the components and evidence associated with educational scholarship Medical Education 2007: 41: 1002–1009 Consensus conference of AAMC 5 areas of educational activity Teaching, Curriculum Advising and/or mentoring Educational leadership and/or administration Learner assessment Scholarly approach: documenting how draw from others Scholarship: documenting public display, peer review, dissemination

88 Advancing educators and education Medical Education 2007: 41: 1002–1009
Q2Engage Quality Quantity Engagement with Community

89 Teaching Portfolios Acad Med. 2004;79:783-90
Aspects Personal statement/philosophy for context Summarize major accomplishments/activities Summarized evidence regarding quality and effectiveness of activities Teaching scholarship is “incomplete unless communication to peers and other scholars occurs…” (Beattie, Acad Med. 2000;75:871-6.) Teaching scholarship is “incomplete unless communication to peers and other scholars occurs in addition to presentation to the usual audience of students, colleagues or the public” 89


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