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Lisa Rakoz, Program Supervisor Health and Fitness Education Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Essential Academic Learning Requirements Grade.

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Presentation on theme: "Lisa Rakoz, Program Supervisor Health and Fitness Education Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Essential Academic Learning Requirements Grade."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Lisa Rakoz, Program Supervisor Health and Fitness Education Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Essential Academic Learning Requirements Grade Level Expectations Classroom Based Assessments Are you Ready for the Challenge? Get Ready For This!

3 Welcome to Health & Fitness

4 ACTIVE LIFESTYLE - The student acquires the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain an active lifestyle: Movement, and nutrition.physical fitness,

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11 SUPERSIZE The larger chair in a New York hospital provides more room for an obese person.

12 Recognizing patterns of growth and development, HEALTH SKILLS - The student acquires the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain a healthy life: reducing health risks, and living safely.

13 Muscular System There are more than 600 muscles in your body! It takes more muscles to frown than to smile! Growth and Development

14 Cardiorespiratory System

15 Skeletal System

16 Curricular Priorities Establishing Curricular Priorities Worth being familiar with Important to know and to do Enduring understanding

17 Establishing Curricular Priorities The name of the collar bone is the clavicle Movement is controlled by muscular tissue attached to bones Skeletal system provides structure and allows movement

18 INFLUENCING FACTORS – The student analyzes and The student analyzes and evaluates the impact of real-life influences on health.

19 The average teen views 300-500 ads per day!

20 The average teen spends more time watching television than in the classroom. The typical child views about 40,000 ads per year on TV alone

21 The number of cans of soda the average male teenager drinks each year

22 On MTV, 75% of music videos will involve sexual imagery, 50% involve violence and 80% will combine the two.

23 Every year American adolescents view nearly 15,000 instances of sexual material on television.

24 1/4th of sexually active teens will have an STD before they are old enough to vote

25 HEALTH/FITNESS PLANNING - The student effectively analyzes health and safety information to develop health and fitness plans based on life goals.

26 Fitness Goals

27 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults between 1985 and 2006 Source of the data: The data shown in these maps were collected through CDCs Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Each year, state health departments use standard procedures to collect data through a series of monthly telephone interviews with U.S. adults.

28 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

29 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

30 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

31 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

32 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

33 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

34 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

35 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

36 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

37 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

38 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

39 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

40 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

41 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

42 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

43 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

44 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

45 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 54 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002

46 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 54 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003

47 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14 15%–19% 20%–24% 25% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004

48 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% 30% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005

49 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–28% 28.1% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006

50 Citations Source 1. Source: BRFSS, CDC. 2. Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA 1999;282:16. 3. Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA 2001;286:10. 4. Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA 2003;289:1

51 Overweight & Obesity in Washington 2002

52 Childrens bedrooms have become multi-media centers 68% have a TV 68% have a TV 54% have a VCR or DVD 54% have a VCR or DVD 49% have a video game or games 49% have a video game or games 31% have a computer 31% have a computer Some have a refrigerator and Some have a refrigerator and a lot are using the cell phone to a lot are using the cell phone to call mom to see whats for call mom to see whats for dinner! dinner!

53 SURVEY SAYS Young people, ages 8-18, showed that their daily activities accounted for the following: Watching TV – 3 hrs. 51 min. Watching TV – 3 hrs. 51 min. Using the computer – 1 hr. 2 min. Using the computer – 1 hr. 2 min. Video games – 49 min. Video games – 49 min. (Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8-18 Year Olds. Menlo Park, Calif.: Kaiser Family Foundation, 2005)

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55 Poor Nutrition: What Is It Costing Our Kids?

56 $209 MILLION Annual advertising budget for Coca-Cola and Diet Coke

57 $4 MILLION Annual marketing budget for the National Cancer Institutes 5 A Day Campaign

58 We need to change…

59 Lets start now!

60 Our Vision….. …Fit and Healthy Kids in Washington State

61 Who you are and what you do ………in the life of a child! make a positive difference… DOES

62 Lisa Rakoz Program Supervisor Health and Fitness Education 360-725-4977 TTY 360-664-3631 lisa.rakoz@k12.wa.us

63 We tend to remember: 10% of what we read 20% of what we hear 30% of what we see 50% of what we hear and see 70% of what we say 90% of what we say and do


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