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Understanding the Burnett County Economy: Opportunities for Tomorrow Economic Summit Burnett County Development Association Lodge at Crooked Lake, Siren,

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Presentation on theme: "Understanding the Burnett County Economy: Opportunities for Tomorrow Economic Summit Burnett County Development Association Lodge at Crooked Lake, Siren,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Understanding the Burnett County Economy: Opportunities for Tomorrow Economic Summit Burnett County Development Association Lodge at Crooked Lake, Siren, WI April 30, 2008

2 JERRY HEMBD Northern Center for Community and Economic Development University of Wisconsin-Superior University of Wisconsin-Extension

3 Demographics Employment Income (and wealth) Strategies Trade area analysis

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5 Percentage Population Change by Decade 1900 – 2000 Wisconsin United States Northwest Wisconsin

6 Wisconsin United States Burnett County Percentage Population Change by Decade 1900 – 2000

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8 Components of Population Change in Burnett County: 1990-2000

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11 Components of Population Change in Burnett County: 2000-2006

12 Projected Population Change in Burnett County: 2000-2030 (from 15,674 to 17,194)

13 Graying Nation By 2030, one in every five Americans will be 65 or older, according to census projections. Burnett County: From 20.3 to 36.5 %

14 International Aging Comparisons

15 Percent White Population: 2000 Wisconsin = 89% United States = 69% Source: US Census Bureau, Census 2000

16 National Employment by Super Sector

17 Wisconsin = 18.8% United States = 11.4% Share of Manufacturing Jobs Source: DWD, Census of Employment & Wages, 2003 1- 9 Percent 10 - 19 Percent 20 - 29 Percent 30 – 39 Percent

18 Wisconsin = 9.5% United States = 9.8% Share of Leisure and Hospitality Jobs Source: DWD, Census of Employment & Wages, 2003 5 - 8 Percent 9 - 10 Percent 11 - 19 Percent 20 – 29 Percent

19 Wisconsin = 18.8% United States = 20.9% Share of Education & Health Care Jobs Source: DWD, Census of Employment & Wages, 2003 10 - 18 Percent 16 - 19 Percent 20 – 24 Percent 25 – 32 Percent

20 Wisconsin = 20.6% United States = 20.8% Share of Transportation and Trade Jobs Source: DWD, Census of Employment & Wages, 2002 4 - 15 Percent 16 - 21 Percent 22 – 29 Percent 30 – 55 Percent

21 Prominent Industries in Burnett County January 2007 Industry2006 Annual Average Wage Employees Executive, legislative, gen. government$ 26,461710 Food services and drinking places$ 9,100456 Educational services$ 28,310387 Fabricated metal product manufacturing$ 44,811348 Food manufacturing*N/A Hospitals*N/A Food & beverage stores$ 14,420163 Nursing & residential care facilities$ 22,985145 Machinery manufacturing$ 47,291144 Ambulatory health care services$ 20,310131 *data suppressed for confidentiality, and not available for calculation

22 Prominent Public and Private Sector Employers in Burnett County June 2007 EstablishmentProduct or Service St Croix Tribal CouncilTribal governments Park Hannifin CorpFluid power valve and hose fitting mfg Burnett Dairy CorpCheese manufacturing Burnett Medial Center IncGeneral medical and surgical hospitals Grantsburg Public SchoolElementary and secondary schools County of BurnettExecutive, legislative, & gen government offices School District of WebsterElementary and secondary schools School District of SirenElementary and secondary schools Nexen Group IncMechanical power transmission equipment mfg McNally IndustriesMachine Shops

23 Demand-Side Situation State of Wisconsin Growth in the number of jobs but at lower than national rate Increasing demand is being driven by increase in people turning retirement age Retired population are leading consumers they are generally wealthier than people think

24 Supply Side of the Labor Market State of Wisconsin Decrease in numbers of younger entry level workers – tied to decrease in births Increasing retirement of baby boomers Nearly full labor force participation rate for females Commuting net loss (90,000 out; 20,000 in) Loss in college graduates to neighboring states Low in-migration, especially foreign born immigrants (4.5% vs. 12.5% nationally)

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26 Northwest Wisconsin Workforce Development Area Ashland Bayfield Burnett Douglas Iron Price Rusk Sawyer Taylor Washburn

27 10 Largest Industry Groups (almost half the jobs in NW Wisconsin) Education services Food services and drinking places Nursing and resident care facilities Hospitals Wood manufacturing Executive, legislative and general government Ambulatory health care services Food and beverage stores Truck transportation Social assistance

28 Labor Force Participation by Age Group

29 Population and Labor Force in Northwest Wisconsin: 1975 - 2020 Source: WI Dept of Admin, Demographic Services, DWD Local Area Unemployment Statistics, OEA

30 Percent Change in Northwest, WI Projected Population by Age Group (2005-2015) Source: WI State Demographic Center

31 What Do You Plan to Do in Retirement? Source: AARP Working in Retirement Study, 2003

32 Northwest Wisconsin Job Growth by Industry 2002-2012

33 16 Occupations with Most New Jobs 2002 - 2012 Cashiers Retail salespersons Registered nurses Nursing Aides Truck drivers (heavy/tractor-trailer) Comb food preparation (incl fast food) Waiters/Waitresses Office clerks/general Carpenters Personal and home care aides Janitors and cleaners Sales reps (wholesale/ manufacturing) General and operations managers Maintenance and repair workers (general) Bartenders Maids/housekeeping cleaners

34 16 Occupations with Most Openings 2002 - 2012 Cashiers Retail salespersons Waiters/Waitresses Comb food preparation (incl fast food) Nursing aides Truck drivers (heavy/tractor-trailer) Registered nurses Personal and home care aides Bartenders Janitors/cleaners Laborers (freight, stock, hand) Office clerks/general Carpenters Sales reps (wholesale/ manufacturing) Maids/housekeeping cleaners Elementary school teachers

35 Northwest Wisconsin 16 Occupations with Greatest % Increase Home Health Aides Personal Care Aides Social/Human Service Assistants Registered Nurses Preschool Teachers Electricians Receptionists & Information Clerks Bus Drivers, School Child Care Workers Counter and Rental Clerks Plumbers, Pipefitters, Steamfitters Hairdressers/Cosmetologists Carpenters Truck Drivers, Heavy & Tractor-Trailer Nursing Aides Child/Family/School Social Workers

36 Education Typically Required in Projected Annual Openings in Northwest Wisconsin

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40 Bottom Line in Northwest Wisconsin 1 out of every 5 jobs is filled by a worker from outside the county where the job is located 1 out of every 4 workers is filling a job outside of the county where the worker resides

41 Northwest Wisconsin Commuting Patterns by Workplace County Workplace Total Jobs Commuter Jobs Commuters as Percent of Total Ashland9,186.2,627.28.6 Bayfield4,373.655.15.0 Burnett5,347.834.15.6 Douglas17,582.4,407.25.1 Iron2,431.903.37.2 Price7,297.1,219.16.7 Rusk6,877.1,219.17.7 Sawyer7,082.1,232.17.4 Taylor9,796.1,789.18.3 Washburn6,481.1,620.25.0 NW WDA76,452.16,305.21.3

42 Northwest Wisconsin Commuting Patterns by Residence County Residence Total Workers Commute to Work Commuters as Percent of Total Ashland7,674.1,115.14.5 Bayfield6,542.2,824.43.2 Burnett6,734.2,221.33.0 Douglas20,323.7,148.35.2 Iron2,806.1,278.45.6 Price7,322.1,244.17.0 Rusk6,888.1,230.17.9 Sawyer6,979.1,129.16.2 Taylor9,700.1,693.17.5 Washburn7,015.2,154.30.7 NW WDA81,983.22,036.26.9

43 COMMUTING PATTERNS 4,513 residents live and work in county 2,221 residents commute outside the county for a job 835 residents of other counties commute to the county for work NET OUTFLOW OF 1,386 WORKERS

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46 Personal Income Components Burnett County: 2005

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52 Wisconsin Lakes Distribution and Clarity Clearer lakes have smaller trophics state indexes and larger secchi depths.

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55 1989-1994 1999-2004 County-Level Housing Value Changes (Source: Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance) Higher relative increase in housing values Average increase in housing values Lower relative increase in housing values

56 County PCPV Growth 1984 – 2004 > 200% 100% - 200% < 100% Per Capita Property Value Growth Source: The Wisconsin Taxpayer (August 2006).

57 County PCPI 2004 > 5% above state average Near state average > 5% below state average Per Capita Personal Income Source: The Wisconsin Taxpayer (August 2006).

58 PCW 2004 > 5% above state average Near state average > 5% below state average Per Capita Wealth Source: The Wisconsin Taxpayer (August 2006).

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60 Prepared by the Applied Population Laboratory, UW-Madison/Extension

61 The Creative Class consists of a series of occupations who add economic value through their own creativity and knowledge. Super Creative Core Includes occupations in: Computer and mathematical; Architecture and engineering; Life, physical, and social science; Education, training, and library; Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media Creative Professionals Includes occupations in: Management; Business and financial operations; Legal; Healthcare practitioners and technical; High-end sales and sales management The Creative Class – Another Way to Measure Human Capital

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63 Strategies for Community Economic Development 1.Increasing the flow of dollars into the community 2.Increasing the recirculation of dollars in the community 3.Increasing the amount of resources available 4.Using existing resources differently 5.Changing the rules 6.Acting smarter 7.Getting lucky

64 Increasing the Flow of Dollars into the Community 1.Develop local industrial sites, public services, and potential employee information. 2.Develop community and regional facilities necessary to attract new employers in these areas: i.Transportation (e.g. airports, railways, highways) ii.Recreational facilities (e.g. parks, hunting grounds, restaurants, hotels, convention centers) iii.Communications (e.g. newspaper, telephone) iv.Business services (e.g. banking, computers, legal assistance, accounting) 3.Expand purchases by nonlocal people (e.g. tourists, neighboring citizens) through appropriate advertising and promotions. 4.Ensure that key public services (e.g. fire and police, water and sewer, general administration) are more than satisfactory. 5.Recognize the important role of transfers, such as retirement benefits, and unemployment compensation as a flow of funds into the community.

65 Increasing the Recirculation of Dollars into the Community 1.Identify market potential of retail outlets through surveys of consumer needs and buying habits. 2.Improve share of actual market captured through downtown analysis and renewal through i.using consumer and merchant surveys. ii.providing convenient parking or public transit. iii.reviewing store hours and merchandising. 3.Aid businesses in developing employee training programs to improve quality of service. 4.Encourage local citizens and businesses to buy locally by providing information programs. 5.Encourage collective action through the formation of organizations such as Chamber of Commerce or Merchants Association.

66 Increasing the Amount of Resources Available 1.Organizing community capital resources to assist new business formation or to assist in attracting new business. i.Encourage investment of private funds locally through formation of capital groups. ii.Encourage the use of secondary capital markets and public financing programs. iii.Encourage the use of industrial revenue bonding, bank loans. 2.Organizing training programs for youth, immigrants, and resident population. 3.Encouraging population in-migration. 4.Providing the same services to start-up businesses as provided to businesses being sought from outside the community. 5.Creating an encouraging community attitude toward entrepreneurship.

67 Using Existing Resources Differently 1.Strengthening management capacities of existing firms through educational programs (e.g. personnel, finance, organizations). 2.Encouraging business growth through identification of equity and loan capital sources. 3.Developing training programs for workers using new and different techniques. 4.Increasing knowledge of new technology through educational programs in science and engineering. 5.Aiding employers in improving workplace quality through educational programs, employment counseling, and social services (e.g. day care, health services). 6.Developing community and regional facilities that improve local business efficiency and access to nonlocal markets (e.g. transportation, services, communication)

68 Changing the Rules 1.Ensuring correct use of public assistance programs for the elderly, handicapped, and others who cannot work. 2.Supporting political activities to ensure fair treatment of community concerns by broader governmental units. 3.Reviewing how retirees and handicapped people might find services, access, housing, volunteer organizations, and community attitudes. 4.Minimizing contradictory regulations and regulatory barriers, including uncertainty.

69 Acting Smarter 1.Identify market potential for new retail, wholesale, and input-providing businesses. 2.Organize to provide individual counsel and intensive education for those interested in forming a new business. 3.Utilize aids from broader government whenever possible (e.g. streets, parks, lake improvements, emergency employment) through active monitoring and support of the activities of local officials. 4.Identify specific public programs, projects, offices, and/or services that could be located in the community and organize politically to secure them. 5.Encourage collective action through formation of organizations such as economic/industrial development corporations. 6.Ensure that quality and access and appropriateness of local school systems, including vocational-technical. 7.Identify through research the most desired type of basic employer with greatest potential. 8.Organize business-networking forums. 9.Sponsor business appreciation events 10.Create organizations (including high school programs) to stimulate entrepreneurial thinking and action.

70 Getting Lucky 1.Examine old high school yearbooks for previous graduates who might like to return to the community. 2.Promote locally available natural resources and amenities to outside visitors. 3.Design vacant residential sites for development.

71 Trade Area Analysis Sales retention – looking at ability to capture local expenditures Local potential sales – adjusts for local incomes Trade area capture – customer equivalents Pull factor – estimates drawing power from outside county, compares trade area capture to local population –Greater than one selling to people outside of county –Less that one county residents purchasing outside of county

72 Taxable Retail Sales Potential Sales 2006 BurnettPolkWashburn Food Services & Drinking Places (Restaurants & Bars)15,712,14844,445,52015,289,647 Performing Arts, Spectator Sports & Related Industries907,2722,566,434882,876 Amusement, Gambling, Recreation Industries1,127,4303,189,2021,097,113 Automobiles & Other Motor Vehicles20,581,31658,219,11020,027,882 Gasoline Stations (including convenience stores with gas)2,826,4447,995,2642,750,441 Clothing & Accessories Stores5,912,09016,723,7425,753,113 Electronic & Appliance Stores3,519,5329,955,8263,424,891 Food & Beverage Stores7,167,68220,275,4816,974,942 Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores15,181,29642,943,88014,773,070 Health & Personal Care Stores1,705,7614,825,1481,659,893 Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, & Music Stores2,904,7628,216,8052,826,652 General Merchandise Stores17,286,79548,899,77916,821,951 Other Store Retailers16,710,10747,268,48316,260,771 Nonstore Retailers1,834,0445,188,0261,784,726

73 Taxable Retail Sales Surplus/Leakage 2006 BurnettPolkWashburn Food Services & Drinking Places (Restaurants & Bars)1,530,652(10,052,120)270,553 Performing Arts, Spectator Sports & Related Industries- S -668,166- S - Amusement, Gambling, Recreation Industries26,370(988,402)247,287 Automobiles & Other Motor Vehicles(3,029,716)(9,845,110)15,209,518 Gasoline Stations (including convenience stores with gas)2,814,3567,210,1361,320,559 Clothing & Accessories Stores(5,032,890)(14,912,742)(4,276,313) Electronic & Appliance Stores(2,877,132)(7,654,426)(1,808,891) Food & Beverage Stores1,624,51830,5194,042,658 Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores(525,896)9,576,7207,300,730 Health & Personal Care Stores(1,073,161)(3,402,748)(564,693) Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, & Music Stores(914,362)(6,012,005)962,948 General Merchandise Stores(11,533,595)7,678,221(11,217,151) Other Store Retailers(4,857,907)(15,576,883)240,829 Nonstore Retailers(1,145,244)(3,078,426)(29,126)

74 Total Taxable Retail Sales Surplus/Leakage ($) 200420052006 Burnett(10,817,546)(8,195,000)(22,098,660) Polk(11,329,785)3,083,000(35,606,455) Sawyer73,188,61677,377,00068,359,297 Washburn23,370,97430,191,00015,356,236

75 Taxable Retail Sales Pull Factor 2006 BurnettPolkSawyerWashburn Food Services & Drinking Places (Restaurants & Bars)1.0970.7441.6591.018 Performing Arts, Spectator Sports & Related Industries - S -1.2601.336- S - Amusement, Gambling, Recreation Industries1.0230.6902.3031.225 Automobiles & Other Motor Vehicles0.8530.8311.6041.759 Gasoline Stations (including convenience stores with gas)1.9961.9021.6121.480 Clothing & Accessories Stores0.1490.1080.4200.257 Electronic & Appliance Stores0.1830.2310.5400.472 Food & Beverage Stores1.2271.0021.1441.580 Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores0.9651.2232.0991.494 Health & Personal Care Stores0.3710.2950.1100.660 Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, & Music Stores0.6850.2681.1621.341 General Merchandise Stores0.3331.1572.2710.333 Other Store Retailers0.7090.6701.0731.015 Nonstore Retailers0.3760.4070.3420.984

76 Taxable Retail Sales Pull Factor Burnett County 200420052006 Food Services & Drinking Places (Restaurants & Bars)1.0831.231.097 Performing Arts, Spectator Sports & Related Industries0.0000.01 - S - Amusement, Gambling, Recreation Industries0.7560.881.023 Automobiles & Other Motor Vehicles1.0031.030.853 Gasoline Stations (including convenience stores with gas)2.1452.081.996 Clothing & Accessories Stores0.1890.170.149 Electronic & Appliance Stores0.1390.160.183 Food & Beverage Stores1.1261.321.227 Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores1.2371.120.965 Health & Personal Care Stores0.4060.410.371 Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, & Music Stores0.3710.530.685 General Merchandise Stores0.3420.330.333 Other Store Retailers1.1001.090.709 Nonstore Retailers0.5040.550.376

77 Total Taxable Retail Sales Pull Factor 200420052006 Burnett0.8960.920.798 Polk0.9591.010.885 Sawyer1.6461.701.577 Washburn1.2271.311.144

78 Taxable Service Sales Potential Sales 2006 BurnettPolkWashburn Hotels, Motels, and Other Tourist Accommodations3,546,54910,032,2523,451,182 Banking, Insurance, and Other Finance Activities820,6342,321,357798,567 Administrative and Support Services1,216,6443,441,5661,183,929 Health Care and Social Assistance Services167,6671,040,033357,780 Personal and Household Services4,491,02612,703,9284,370,262 Business Services4,052,01111,462,0713,943,052 Repair and Maintenance Services3,620,86110,242,4612,523,496 Professional Services72,787205,89770,830 Architectural, Engineering, and Related Services76,133215,36074,086 Computer System Services2,101,6105,944,9002,045,097 Scientific and Other Services384,4801,087,592374,141 Rental and Leasing Services3,964,3941,1214,2243,857,791 Real Estate Services (Rental, Management, Appraisal)149,999424,307145,965

79 Taxable Service Sales Surplus/Leakage 2006 BurnettPolkWashburn Hotels, Motels, and Other Tourist Accommodations1,499,251(4,158,652)524,618 Banking, Insurance, and Other Finance Activities(352,234)(1,337,557)(295,167) Administrative and Support Services(724,044)(937,766)(826,129) Health Care and Social Assistance Services(337,667)(570,033)(149,980) Personal and Household Services(2,515,826)(5,462,928)586,338 Business Services(2,347,211)(6,076,471)(1,472,652) Repair and Maintenance Services3,081,7391,458,539800,104 Professional Services- S - Architectural, Engineering, and Related Services- S - Computer System Services(1,742,210)(3,611,100)(605,697) Scientific and Other Services- S -(378,792)(341,541) Rental and Leasing Services(2,221,194)(6,742,424)(1,226,791) Real Estate Services (Rental, Management, Appraisal)- S -

80 Total Taxable Service Sales Surplus/Leakage ($) 200420052006 Burnett(3,180,294)(3,917,000)(5,240,792) Polk(16,791,148)(15,745,000)(25,734,413) Sawyer13,547,69714,447,00012,266,949 Washburn(1,011,165)933,000(2,060,576)

81 Taxable Service Sales Pull Factor 2006 BurnettPolkWashburn Hotels, Motels, and Other Tourist Accommodations1.4230.5851.152 Banking, Insurance, and Other Finance Activities0.5710.4240.630 Administrative and Support Services0.4050.7280.302 Health Care and Social Assistance Services0.0820.4520.581 Personal and Household Services0.4400.5701.134 Business Services0.4210.4700.627 Repair and Maintenance Services1.8511.1421.227 Professional Services- S - Architectural, Engineering, and Related Services- S - Computer System Services0.1710.3930.704 Scientific and Other Services- S -0.6520.087 Rental and Leasing Services0.4400.3990.682 Real Estate Services (Rental, Management, Appraisal)- S -

82 Taxable Service Sales Pull Factor Burnett County 200420052006 Hotels, Motels, and Other Tourist Accommodations1.3681.261.423 Banking, Insurance, and Other Finance Activities0.2630.360.571 Administrative and Support Services0.3780.490.405 Health Care and Social Assistance Services0.1050.170.082 Personal and Household Services0.5350.520.440 Business Services0.4480.440.421 Repair and Maintenance Services2.2062.111.851 Professional Services0.1960.07- S - Architectural, Engineering, and Related Services0.0000.01- S - Computer System Services0.1840.280.171 Scientific and Other Services0.7480.23- S - Rental and Leasing Services0.4140.440.440 Real Estate Services (Rental, Management, Appraisal)0.4450.28- S -

83 Total Taxable Service Sales Pull Factor 200420052006 Burnett0.8490.820.781 Polk0.7040.730.619 Sawyer1.5891.621.475 Washburn0.9521.051.004

84 Next Steps?

85 Questions?

86 Northern Center for Community and Economic Development Jerry Hembd, Director University of Wisconsin-Superior Belknap & Catlin, PO Box 2000 Superior, Wisconsin 54880 Phone: 715-394-8208 Fax: 715-394-8592 E-mail: jhembd@uwsuper.edu Website: http://www.uwsuper.edu/ncced


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