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Overview of Ferguson, et al. Effect of offering different levels of support and free nicotine replacement therapy via an English national telephone quitline:

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Presentation on theme: "Overview of Ferguson, et al. Effect of offering different levels of support and free nicotine replacement therapy via an English national telephone quitline:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Overview of Ferguson, et al. Effect of offering different levels of support and free nicotine replacement therapy via an English national telephone quitline: randomised controlled trial BMJ 2012;344:e1696 (Published 23 March 2012)

2 Study Design & Methods Setting: National quitline, England Participants: 2591 non-pregnant adult (16+) smokers, called quitline and agreed to set a quit date Randomization: participants assigned to standard support (no NRT) (n=648) proactive support (no NRT) (n=648) standard support (NRT) (n=648) proactive support (no NRT) (n=649)

3 Intervention – Level of Support Standard Support Initial enrollment call Messages sent before, on, and after quit date (1, 3, and 6 mo) by , letter, or text (opt-out) 4 Proactive telephone support calls offered. If accepted, contacted -1wk, on quit date, +2d, +3wk. Calls were brief and unstructured Proactive Support Initial enrollment call Messages sent before, on, and after quit date (1, 3, and 6 mo) by , letter, or text (opt-out) 6-7 Proactive telephone support calls (no opt-out) at (-2wk), -1wk, quit date, +3d, +7d, +14d, +21d. Calls were highly structured, tailored to quit process

4 Intervention – Nicotine Replacement Therapy No NRT Info re: obtaining support including NRT from NHS sources NRT 21 days of patches (15mg) Participants had to call the NHS pharmacy (toll-free number) to have NRT mailed 2 nd 21-day supply available in same way

5 Results Response rates and baseline characteristics similar across conditions

6 Results – Cessation Outcomes (standard vs. proactive)

7 Results – Cessation Outcomes (no NRT vs. NRT)

8 Successful Telephone Contacts Reported use of supportStandard Support (n=1295) Proactive Support (n=1296) No. participants receiving outbound calls Mean (SD) No. of calls participants received 2.44 (1.38)3.35 (1.97) Median (interquartile range) no. of calls participants received 2 (1-3)3 (1-5)

9 Use of NRT Reported use of supportNo NRT (n=1296)NRT (n=1295) Received any study NRT--555 (42.9%) Non-trial support NRT w/out prescription222 (17.1%)276 (21.3%) NRT from health prof.254 (19.6%)225 (17.4%) Bupropion17 (1.3%)20 (1.5%) Varenicline101 (7.8%)64 (4.9%)

10 Discussion In England, cessation medications are freely available through the NHS, and standard care includes information about how to access them. Similar numbers of completed calls between groups Similarity between services received probably explains the similarity in outcomes achieved. (p. 5)

11 Conclusion and Policy Implications In England, where support for smoking cessation is available to all smokers either free or at relatively low cost, adding additional proactive telephone counseling or an offer of free nicotine replacement therapy to usual quitline care did not affect smoking cessation rates. On the basis of this study, providing these through a quitline is not recommended. (p. 5)

12 NAQCs Position NAQC agrees with the findings as stated by Ferguson et al. for the national quitline in England within the context of the National Health Service. NAQC notes that the availability of NRT in England differs significantly from the availability of NRT in the U.S. and Canadian context. NRT is not freely available in the U.S. and Canada, thus making it difficult to generalize the study findings to a North American context. NAQC notes that the current state of the evidence suggests that providing NRT through quitlines in the U.S. does help more smokers quit. (McAfee et al. 2008; An et al. 2006; Schillo 2012 forthcoming)

13 NAQCs Position (cont.) Given the state of the evidence and that the context within which quitlines operate is significantly different for U.S. and Canadian quitlines as compared to those in England, NAQC recommends that U.S. and Canadian quitlines should continue to provide NRT through quitlines, or consider providing it through quitlines. NAQC suggests that more research is needed around what elements of counseling make it more effective; what timing, dose and distribution mechanisms make it more effective; and for what populations. More research is also needed around the psychology of NRT use. (see for NAQCs Research Agenda for Quitlines)

14 References McAfee, T. A., Bush, T., et al. (2008). Nicotine patches and uninsured quitline callers. A randomized trial of two versus eight weeks. Am J Prev Med; 35(2): An, L. C., Schillo, B. A., et al. (2006). Increased reach and effectiveness of a statewide tobacco quitline after the addition of access to free nicotine replacement therapy. Tob Control; 15(4): NAQC. Quitline Service Offering Models: A Review of the Evidence and Recommendations for Practice in Times of Limited Resources. Quality Improvement Initiative (B. Schillo, PhD). Oakland, CA. Forthcoming 2012.


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