Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Effects of Survey Mode on Responses: An Experiment of Social Desirability Biases in Telephone, Interviewer, and Online Surveys Indeok Song Joongbu University,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Effects of Survey Mode on Responses: An Experiment of Social Desirability Biases in Telephone, Interviewer, and Online Surveys Indeok Song Joongbu University,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Effects of Survey Mode on Responses: An Experiment of Social Desirability Biases in Telephone, Interviewer, and Online Surveys Indeok Song Joongbu University, Korea Sung Kyum Cho Chungnam National University

2 Contents Background: 3 Surveys on Gambling AddictionBackground: 3 Surveys on Gambling Addiction Research Question & PurposeResearch Question & Purpose Review of Previous ResearchReview of Previous Research MethodsMethods ResultsResults Discussions & SuggestionsDiscussions & Suggestions

3 Results of 2010s Surveys

4

5 Research Question What is the reason for the inconsistencies among 3 surveys results? Which mode does produce the most accurate estimates?Sampling? Survey Mode?

6 Previous Research Survey modes can be equivalent but are not always identical (Riva et al., 2003, p. 79) –Sensitivity & Social desirability (Booth-Kewley, Larson, & Miyoshi, 2007; Couper, 2000; Huang, 2006; Joinson, 1999; Kays, Gathercoal, & Buhrow, 2011; Tourangeau & Yan, 2007, 2011 and so on) Mode of admin.: Self- vs. Interviewer- administered –Self-administration increases reporting of socially undesirable behaviors (Corkrey & Parkinson, 2002; Currivan et al., 2004; Hochstim, 1967; Moskowitz, 2004; Mott, 1985; Richman et al., 1999, and so on) Paper-Pencil, Online > Telephone, Interviewer

7 Previous Research Interviewer or 3 rd party presence –Social desirability bias is worse in telephone survey than in face-to-face interviews (Aquilino, 1994; Groves & Kahn, 1979; Holbrook et al., 2003; Johnson, Hougland, & Clayton, 1989; Leeuw & van der Zouwen, 1988, and so on) –The presence of others affects responses to sensitive questions (Aquilino, Wright, & Supple, 2000; Harrison, 2001; Lombard & Ditton, 1997; Sudman, 2001; Tourangeau & Yan, 201, and so on ) –Online survey yields the lowest level of other peoples presence Online > Interviewer > Telephone

8 Research Purpose Controlling for variances from sampling and different groups of samples, to examine the effects of survey modes on the responses to sensitive questions.

9 Methods Pretest-posttest 3 between-group experimental design –93 undergraduate students 66 analyzed Out of 66, male 38 (57.6%), female 28 (42.4%), mean age 20.61 (SD=1.97) Paper-pencil (N=93) 2 weeks Random Assignment Online (n=21) Telephone (n=24) Interview (n=21)

10 Methods Questionnaire Design –Addiction Scales Gambling addiction (4pt., 9 items) –M=9.24, SD=2.54, α=.84 Internet addiction (4pt., 15 items) –M=29.13, SD=7.24, α=.90 Game addiction (4pt., 20 items) –M=26.80, SD=8.84, α=.96 –Dissatisfaction with self-appearance (5pt., 6 items) M=14.43, SD=3.71, α=.66 –Sexual values (5pt., 10 items) M=27.88, SD=7.14, α=.89

11 Methods –Sexual experience Age of the first experience –n=27, M=18.59, SD=1.67 Number of sexual partners –n=26, M=10.81, SD=3.68 Sexual behaviors (physical contact, cuddle, kiss, caress, intercourse) experienced in current relationship –n=19, M=3.68, SD=1.42 –Demographics Gender, age, household-income

12 Results Homogeneity among groups (pretest: paper- pencil)Homogeneity among groups (pretest: paper- pencil) SourcedfFp Gambling Addiction(2, 63)1.29.28 Internet Addiction(2, 63).09.91 Game Addiction(2, 63)2.13.13 Dissatisfaction with Self(2, 63).31.73 Sexual Values(2, 63).28.76 Age of 1 st Experience(2, 24)1.89.19 No. of Partners(2, 23).59.56 Sexual Behaviors(2, 16).24.79

13 Responses for Game Addiction

14 Responses for Dissatisfaction with Self-Appearance

15 2 x 3 Factorial ANOVAs Independent Variables –2 groups (Low & High) by median split –3 modes (Online, Telephone, Interview) Dependent Variables –Changes in responses = Pretest – Posttest DVsNMSD Gambling Addiction66.272.30 Internet Addiction661.086.78 Game Addiction661.148.05 Dissatisfaction with Self661.183.13 Sexual Values661.444.65 Age of 1 st Experience22.681.49 No. of Partners22-3.9516.76 Sexual Behaviors16-.131.46

16 Changes in Responses for Gambling Addiction

17 Changes in Responses for Internet Addiction

18 Changes in Responses for Game Addiction

19 Changes in Responses for Dissatisfaction with Self-Appearance

20 Changes in Responses for Sexual Values

21 Changes in Responses for Age of the 1 st Intercourse

22 Summary of the Results Responses for Game Addiction & Dissatisfaction with Self-Appearance –Increased in the online survey mode –Decreased in the telephone & interview survey modes Those who scored higher on the sensitive questions are more likely to change their responses in a socially desirable direction –Less addicted (gambling, Internet, game) –Less dissatisfied with self-appearance –Less liberal (more conservative) sexual values –Younger in the age of the 1 st sexual intercourse

23 Discussions & Suggestions Survey responses to sensitive (privacy-related) questions are affected by different survey modes. –Online survey in which respondents are less concerned about their privacies is more likely to elicit franker (more accurate) responses. Paper-pencil (group administration), telephone, interview modes lead respondents to privacy concern & misreport. Suggestion: Dual-mode survey Telephone Sampling Online Questionnaire

24 Any idea or suggestion would be welcomed.


Download ppt "Effects of Survey Mode on Responses: An Experiment of Social Desirability Biases in Telephone, Interviewer, and Online Surveys Indeok Song Joongbu University,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google