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Getting to California gross national product (GNP) – the total value of all goods and service produced by a country in a given year. Edwin Drake – drilled.

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Presentation on theme: "Getting to California gross national product (GNP) – the total value of all goods and service produced by a country in a given year. Edwin Drake – drilled."— Presentation transcript:

1 Getting to California gross national product (GNP) – the total value of all goods and service produced by a country in a given year. Edwin Drake – drilled the first oil well in Pennsylvania in 1859 laissze-faire – let people do as they choose entrepreneurs – people who risk their own capital (money) in organizing and running a business tariff – a tax on imported goods meant to encourage people to buy products produced in their own nation Alexander Graham Bell – invented the telephone (1874) and created the Bell Telephone Company in 1877 (now known as AT&T) Thomas Edison – invented and improved on many products including the phonograph, lightbulb, battery, mimeograph, electric generator and motion picture. Ch 9 Sec 1: The Rise of Industry

2 Intro 2 Chapter Objectives Identify the effects of expanding population on industry. Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development. Section 1: Rise of Industry

3 Section 1-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Economic Factors The free enterprise system nurtured the growth of American industry. Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

4 By the early 1900s, the United States had become the worlds leading industrial nation. Section 1-5 (pages 308–309) The United States Industrializes With the end of the Civil War, American industry expanded and millions of people left their farms to work in mines and factories. Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

5 By 1914 the gross national product (GNP), or total value of goods and services produced by a country, was eight times greater than at the end of the Civil War. Section 1-5 (pages 308–309) The United States Industrializes Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry. 2006 GNP per capita (per person)

6 Section 1-6 Water, timber, coal, iron, and copper are natural resources found in the United States that led to the countrys industrial success. The United States Industrializes (cont.) (pages 308–309) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

7 Section 1-6 Transcontinental railroads increased industrialization by bringing settlers and miners to the West and moving resources to the factories in the East. Petroleum could be turned into kerosene for lanterns and stoves. The United States Industrializes (cont.) (pages 308–309) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

8 Section 1-7 The demand for kerosene created the American oil industry. In 1859 Edwin Drake drilled the first oil well near Titusville, Pennsylvania. As oil production increased, so did economic expansion. The United States Industrializes (cont.) (pages 308–309) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

9 Section 1-7 Between 1860 and 1910, the population of the United States almost tripled. This provided a large workforce and a greater demand for consumer goods. The United States Industrializes (cont.) (pages 308–309) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

10 Section 1-9 (page 310) Free Enterprise Laissez-faire, a French phrase that means let people do as they choose, was a popular idea in the late 1800s. Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry. It doesnt matter if you do or if you dont… Have you ever had a laissez-faire teacher?

11 Section 1-9 (page 310) Free Enterprise Many Americans believed the government should not interfere with the economy. Instead, they wanted supply and demand to regulate prices and wages. Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

12 Section 1-10 Entrepreneurs risked their capital to organize and run a business. In the late 1800s, entrepreneurs were attracted to manufacturing and transportation fields. As a result, hundreds of factories and thousands of miles of railroad were built. Another important source of private capitol was Europe. Foreign investors saw more opportunity for profit in the U.S. than they did at home. Free Enterprise (cont.) (page 310) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

13 Free Enterprise – Robber Barons Robber barons – people who loot an industry but give nothing back.

14 Section 1-10 Another important source of private capitol was Europe. Foreign investors saw more opportunity for profit in the U.S. than they did at home. Free Enterprise (cont.) (page 310) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

15 Section 1-12 (pages 310–311) Governments Role in Industrialism In the late 1800s, state and federal government had a laissez-faire attitude by keeping taxes and spending low and by not imposing regulations on industry. The government did not control wages or prices. It adopted policies to help industry. Since the early 1800s, the northeastern states and southern states debated on economic policies. Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

16 Section 1-13 Northerners wanted high tariffs to protect their industries from foreign competition. Southerners opposed tariffs to keep the cost of imported goods down. After the south seceded, the Morrill Tariff was passed, which reversed years of declining tariffs. Governments Role in Industrialism (cont.) (pages 310–311) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

17 Section 1-14 The high tariffs contradicted laissez-faire policies and harmed many Americans. As the United States raised tariffs on foreign products, other countries responded by raising tariffs against American products. American companies who sold goods overseas, especially farmers, were hurt by these high tariffs. Governments Role in Industrialism (cont.) (pages 310–311) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

18 Section 1-15 Many business leaders and members of Congress felt tariffs were necessary to protect American industry against the already established European factories. By the early 1900s, American industries were larger and highly competitive. Many business leaders began to encourage free trade, believing they could compete internationally and succeed. Governments Role in Industrialism (cont.) (pages 310–311) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

19 New Inventions Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

20 Section 1-17 (pages 311–312) New Inventions (cont.) New inventions increased Americas productivity, which in turn produced wealth and job opportunities. In 1876 Scottish- American inventor Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone. In 1877 Bell and his associates organized the Bell Telephone Company, which later became the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T). Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

21 Section 1-18 In the late 1800s, Thomas Alva Edison invented or perfected the phonograph, the light bulb, the electric generator, the dictaphone, the mimeograph, and the motion picture. In 1882 the Edison Electric Illuminating Co. became a new industry and began supplying electric power to customers in New York City. New Inventions (cont.) (pages 311–312) Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

22 Section 1-19 The clothing industry increased productivity in the mid-1800s with the introduction of the Northrop automatic loom, the power driven sewing machine, and cloth cutters. Mass production in the shoe industry allowed large factories to produce shoes more cheaply and efficiently than local cobblers. The savings were then passed on to the consumer. New Inventions (cont.) (pages 311–312) Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

23 Section 1-21 Checking for Understanding __ 1.policy that government should interfere as little as possible in the nations economy __ 2.the total value of goods and services produced by a country during a year __ 3.one who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise A.gross national product B.laissez-faire C.entrepreneur Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. A C B Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

24 Section 1-22 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Explain how an abundance of natural resources contributed to economic growth in the United States in the late 1800s. Americans did not have to import resources from other countries, saving resources for internal growth. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

25 Section 1-24 Critical Thinking Synthesizing What role did the federal government play in increasing industrialization in the United States after the Civil War? Congress subsidized railroads and sold lands below market value. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

26 Section 1-8 How did the construction of the transcontinental railroad add to an increase in industrialization? The railroads brought settlers and miners to the West to work and moved the resources back to the factories in the East. The United States Industrializes (cont.) (pages 308–309) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

27 Chapter Assessment 4 Reviewing Key Facts The United States had an advantage in industrializing due to its resources and large workforce. What resources did the nation have? Why was its workforce large? The nation had iron ore, water, copper, coal, and timber. Its workforce was large due to large families and floods of immigrants. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

28 Section 1-20 How did technology cause the prices of shoes to go down? Large factories could mass-produce shoes more quickly and cheaply than local cobblers could, resulting in lower prices. New Inventions (cont.) (pages 311–312) Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

29 Section 1-23 Reviewing Themes Economic Factors How did the principles of the free enterprise system, laissez-faire, and profit motive encourage the rise of industry? They put development in the hands of entrepreneurs, not the government. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

30 Section 1-11 Why was Europe an important source of private capital? Foreign investors saw more opportunities for growth and profit in the U.S. than at home. Free Enterprise (cont.) (page 310) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

31 Section 1-16 What were some problems caused by high tariffs? When other countries placed high tariffs against American goods, it hurt American companies selling products overseas. Rural American farmers were especially hard hit by the tariffs, causing many of them to leave farms and take factory jobs. Governments Role in Industrialism (cont.) (pages 310–311) Objective: Identify the effects of expanding population on industry.

32 Chapter Assessment 5 Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) How did inventions contribute to economic growth in the United States in the late 1800s? Inventions helped increase the nations productive capacity and improved transportation and communication. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

33 Chapter Assessment 12 Economics and History The graph below shows steel production from 1865 to 1900. Study the graph and answer the questions on the following slides. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

34 Chapter Assessment 13 Interpreting Graphs Between what years did steel production have the greatest increase? The greatest increase occurred between 1895 and 1900. Economics and History (cont.) Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

35 Chapter Assessment 14 Economics and History (cont.) Making Inferences How did increased steel production contribute to American industrialism? Increased steel production allowed railroads to be built, improving transportation and benefiting industry. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

36 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

37 Section 1-26 Close Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American industrial development. Objective: Explain the effects of technological innovations such as the telephone and telegraph on American development.

38 End of Section 1


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