Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

November 2, 2012 Ann-Claire Anderson Susan Finn Miller.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "November 2, 2012 Ann-Claire Anderson Susan Finn Miller."— Presentation transcript:

1 November 2, 2012 Ann-Claire Anderson Susan Finn Miller

2 Workshop Agenda Introductions Project Background
Overview of Adult Career Pathways (ACP) Tour of the ACP Training and Support Center (ACP-SC) Review of Contextualized Instruction Unpacking ACP-SC Resources Examining and Adapting Career Pathways Contextualized Instructional Resources Designing Contextualized Instruction Workshop Follow-up Activities

3 Designing Instruction for Career Pathways
Three-year initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE) Goal: Assist state and local adult education providers in developing and delivering instructional resources that enable lower-skilled adults to progress on a career pathway and prepare for postsecondary success

4 Designing Instruction for Career Pathways Project Partners
Kratos Learning Center for Occupational Research and Development Technical Work Group 17 expert practitioners from across the country: Adult-Ed Practitioners at Local and State Levels Secondary and Postsecondary Faculty and Administrators Employers Researchers Input and guidance on resources, professional development courses, communities of practice

5 } Project Deliverables Online Resource Collection
Professional Development Courses Regional Workshops E-Newsletters Communities of Practice Issue Briefs Accessible through ACP Training and Support Center:

6 Session 1: Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to: Define career pathways. Explain the importance of career pathways to economic development. Explain the significance of career pathways for lower-skilled adults.

7 Why the focus on Career Pathways?
To address: The critical need for an increased number of those in or entering the workforce to achieve credentials and degrees to stimulate U.S. economic growth. The demand by employers and workers to close the skills mismatch between mid- and high-skilled jobs and those lower-skilled adults in or entering the workforce. The challenge in bridging lower-skilled adults into relevant postsecondary education and training that leads to family-sustaining wages and careers.

8 Joint Commitment to Career Pathways
“The U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor have made a joint commitment to promote the use of career pathways approaches as a promising strategy to help adults acquire marketable skills and industry-recognized credentials through better alignment of education, training and employment, and human and social services among public agencies and with employers.” U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor (2012). Interagency Letter on Career Pathways.

9 Career Pathways in Partnership
Career Pathways are founded upon and managed through a collaborative partnership among workforce, education, human service agencies, business, and other community stakeholders. U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor (2012). Interagency Letter on Career Pathways.

10 Career Pathways – A Definition
Career pathways are… a series of connected education and training strategies and support services that enable individuals to secure industry relevant certification and obtain employment within an occupation and to advance to higher levels of future education and employment in that area. U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor (2012). Interagency Letter on Career Pathways. .

11 Career Pathways Goals Career Pathways services should have among their goals: focus on secondary and postsecondary industry- recognized credentials; sector specific employment; and, advancement over time in education and employment within a sector.

12 Career Pathways Essential Components
Align with secondary and postsecondary education with workforce development systems and human services Connect basic education and skills training through “bridge” curriculum and integrated education and training Programs with multiple entry and exit points that accommodate work schedules with flexible and non-semester-based scheduling, and the innovative use of technology

13 Career Pathways Essential Components
Align with the skill needs of targeted industry sectors important to local, regional, or state economies Use curriculum and instructional strategies appropriate for adults that make work a central context Accelerate participant educational and career advancement through credit for prior learning and other strategies Build in comprehensive support services, including career counseling, child care, and transportation

14 Related Career Pathways Projects
ABE Career Connections (ED-OVAE) Manual - Integrating Adult Basic Education into Career Pathways Policy to Performance (ED-OVAE) Policy to Performance (P2P) Toolkit P2P State Systems Report Career Pathways Technical Assistance Initiative (DOL-ETA) Career Pathways Framework Website of resources

15 Related Career Pathways Projects
Points of Entry (Open Society Foundation) Transition programs preparing prisoners to re-enter the workforce Alliance for Quality Career Pathways (Center for Law and Social Policy—CLASP) Identification of metrics for evaluating state and student success in career pathways programs Career Clusters Initiative (National Association of State Directors of Career and Technical Education) Identification of sixteen broad occupational pathways and their associated content and performance standards

16 Six Key Elements of Career Pathways
Career Pathways Technical Assistance Initiative DOL-ETA. https://learnwork.workforce3one.org

17 Before we move on… Career pathways lead to higher levels of future education and employment. TRUE Career pathways are implemented the same way in every region. FALSE Career pathways consist of a series of connected education and training strategies and support services. Career pathways address employer needs.

18 Session 2: Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to: Name several types of resources that are freely available through the ACP-SC. Describe how to access materials in the ACP-SC Resource Center. List two types of social media that can keep participants connected to project updates. Explain the significance of a community of practice.

19 ACP Training and Support Center

20 Log in and Customize Your Account

21 ACP Training Resources: Online Courses

22 Online Courses

23 Course 1: Building Strategic Partnerships

24 Professional Development Courses
Online, self-paced courses to support professional development needs of local practitioners  Building Strategic Partnerships Developing Effective Bridge Programs Designing Contextualized Instruction – Parts 1 and 2 Integrating Career Planning and Counseling Employer Engagement in Adult Career Pathways How to Sustain Pathways: Funding, Leadership, Policy Using Data for Continuous Improvement

25 ACP News & Events: Social Media

26 Follow Project Activities via Computer or Mobile Device
Adult Career Pathways Training and Support Center (ACP-SC) Facebook Twitter ACP-SC homepage @Career_Pathways or

27 ACP News and Events: Newsletters

28 ACP News E-Newsletter Featuring news from across the country
Current and archived issues available on acp-sc.org Read online or download PDF to share with colleagues.

29 ACP Community: Forums

30 Forums: Communities of Practice

31 Asking Questions and Sharing Knowledge

32 Forums: Communities of Practice
Network, share, and exchange ideas and strategies with people around the country in programs like yours about topics like how-to: Use career pathways with re-entry programs and in correctional education settings, Engage others and build partnerships, Design contextualized instruction and bridge programs, or Integrate effective career planning and counseling.

33 The ACP-SC Resource Center

34 The ACP-SC Resource Center
Showcases resources from the field: Instruction Resources such as lesson plans, curricula, course outlines, and bridge-related course materials that focus on teaching adult education level academic content within the context of a career pathway -(demonstrating the intersection of academic and technical/career content) Professional Development Resources such as toolkits, guides, and manuals that support professional understanding on designing contextualized instruction Support Services Variety of resources that support program elements including assessment, career awareness/exploration, study skills, career planning, goal setting, and academic advising

35 Search for Instructional Resources

36 Sample Content from the Collection

37 Share a Resource

38 Before we move on… Let’s Recap!
What kinds of resources for Adult Career Pathways can you expect to find at the project website? How can you access them?

39 CONTEXTUAL TEACHING AND LEARNING

40 Session 3: Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to: Define contextualized instruction. Identify basic premises underlying contextualized instruction.

41 Definition for Today’s Conversation
Contextualized Instruction – integrates basic reading, math, and language skills and industry and occupation knowledge. relates instructional content to the specific contexts of learners’ lives and interests to increase retention of information and motivation to learn.

42 Relevance of Career Pathways to Contextualized Instruction
How are career pathways relevant to contextual teaching and learning? Provide “instant” lesson context. Facilitate development of lessons that meet employer/workforce needs. Provide contextual framework for the development of entire programs of study along a continuum of academic and technical education.

43 Contextual Teaching and Learning (CTL)
What does a “contextual approach” really mean?

44 A Closer Look at CTL The contextual approach recognizes that:
Learning is a complex, multi-faceted process that goes beyond drill-oriented, stimulus-and-response methodologies.

45 A Closer Look at CTL The contextual approach recognizes that:
Learning occurs only when students process new information in such a way that makes sense to them in their own frame of reference (memory, experience, response).

46 A Closer Look at CTL The contextual approach recognizes that:
The mind naturally seeks meaning in context, in relation to a person’s environment, doing so by searching for relationships that make sense and appear useful.

47 Theoretical Basis for CTL
Convergence of intelligence and learning theories support contextual methods for effective teaching and learning: Gardner: The mind’s capacity for learning is broader than assumed. Kolb: Individuals have a natural ability to learn through a variety of methods. Caine and Caine: Connectedness is a key to effective learning.

48 Before we move on… Learning is enhanced when new information is presented in familiar contexts. TRUE Most people learn best through skill-drill activities. FALSE Most people learn best when concepts are introduced in isolation. Individuals are capable of learning through a variety of methods.

49 Why Use Contextual Strategies?
Adult students don’t want to learn in a vacuum. No longer motivated by “how can I pass this class” but by “how is this course relevant to my future career?” Understanding real-world connections to course content increases student engagement, leading to: Persistence Successful Transitions

50 The Quiz

51 Session 4: Learning Objectives
Based on what they have learned about contextualized instruction, participants will be able to identify the: Characteristics of contextual instruction, Instructor roles in a contextual classroom, Learner roles in a contextual classroom, and Classroom methods associated with contextualized instruction.

52 The Contextual Approach Supports Best Practices for Reaching Adult Learners
Encourages design of learning environments that use multiple teaching modalities and incorporate different forms of learning experiences. Allows learners to discover meaningful relationships between abstract ideas and real-world applications. Enables concepts to be internalized through discovery, reinforcement/modeling, and problem-solving. Provides ongoing feedback that promotes further learner interaction with content. Engages learners and motivates them to persist.

53 The CTL Classroom Environment: The Instructor Role
Facilitator Coach Director Empowers learners “Guide on the side”

54 The CTL Classroom Environment: The Learner Role
Active “doer” Discoverer and user of knowledge Fits together the pieces of the puzzle Eager to ask questions that lead to deeper understanding

55 The CTL Classroom Environment: Teaching Methods
Cooperative learning groups Peer mentoring Gather data to solve problems Formative assessments Hands-on, activity-based learning

56 Characteristics of Learner Engagement
Relating – Learning in the context of one’s life experiences or pre-existing knowledge. Experiencing – Learning by doing, through exploration, discovery, and invention. Applying – Learning by putting skills to use. Cooperating – Learning through sharing, responding, and interacting with others. Transferring – Using knowledge in a new context or novel situation. “Teaching Contextually” by Michael Crawford, Ph.D. CORD, 2001.

57 Stop and Share Describe an episode in which you were engaged in contextual learning—either in or out of the classroom. Share your reflections on the experience. Did the information or skills you learned through contextual strategies "stick" with you better than if you had sat through a lecture? Why or why not? Did the contextual learning experience make learning easier or more difficult for you? Explain.

58 Before we move on.. What questions do you have about contextual teaching and learning?

59 UNPACKING EXAMPLE CURRICULA

60 Characteristics for Unpacking
Workplace context Relevance to career pathways Foundational basic skills addressed1 Learner engagement strategies 1Please note: Inclusion of foundational basic skills and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

61 1. Workplace Context Instructional materials teach basic reading, writing, speaking, and mathematics concepts and skills in contexts applicable to an industrial or occupational setting. Learners participate in authentic workplace situations. Note: The facilitation of learning in context may be structured in many different ways.

62 Contextualizing Adult Basic Education (ABE) Concepts
Reading, writing, listening, speaking, and mathematics can… be taught by ABE instructors using a real-world scenario to provide career pathways context. be addressed in the technical or workforce course by a technical instructor or an ABE co-instructor.

63 2. Relevance to Career Pathways
How do these instructional materials move the adult learner closer to the transition goal of: Employment in a target industry? Enrollment in an industry-specific postsecondary program? (Generally a career and technical program) Career clusters model 16 broad clusters; each has knowledge and skill statements. Each cluster encompasses career pathways. Pathways lead to many occupations.

64 16 Career Clusters

65 Do You Know…? What are several types of standards that apply to Adult Career Pathways instruction?

66 3. Foundational Basic Skills
What are the foundational basic skills content areas? Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking, and Mathematics Where can you find information about the foundational basic skills to be taught in your adult education program? State Adult Education Office Your Program Administrator or Instructional Lead Your syllabus

67 Industry-Specific Technical Skills
Industry-Specific Technical Skills are required for certification on the required expertise levels determined by a certifying association or organization. Where can you locate more information about the technical skills required? Professional organizations or trade associations, e.g., National Association of Manufacturers, National Restaurant Association, National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation Local employers Colleagues from technical programs Local workforce or economic development board

68 Employability Skills Employability skills are:
General skills required to be successful at all levels of employment and in all sectors and fall into three broad skills- applied knowledge, effective relationships, and workplace skills. Sometimes referred to as 21st Century skills, soft skills, and SCANS skills.

69 Employability Skills Framework

70 21st-Century Skills Model Supports Basic Skills and Soft Skills

71 4. Learner Engagement Strategies
REACT strategies for learner engagement: Relating Experiencing Applying Cooperating Transferring These are not necessarily used in a linear sequence. Not all REACT strategies may be present in a single lesson.

72 Before we move on… Which characteristic that we’ll be unpacking-
Teaches basic reading, writing, speaking, and mathematics concepts and skills applicable to an industrial/occupational setting? Workplace context Provides instruction that moves the adult learner closer to the transition goal of employment in a target industry? Career pathways Sets educational expectations for foundational basic skills, technical skills, or employability skills content? Standards Can be remembered using the mnemonic REACT? Learner engagement strategies

73 Unpacking Three Lessons
The following lesson excerpts are taken from complete instructional materials available at:

74 Session 6: Learning Objectives
Participants will unpack three different resources from the ACP-SC instructional resource collection by identifying their: Workplace context Career pathways Skills, concepts, and standards addressed Learning engagement strategies

75

76 Resource 1: Washington ABE Contextual Math
Written by instructors for the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges PowerPoint files (with some audio) containing self-paced lessons integrating occupational content and mathematics The excerpts that follow are from the Commercial Trucking lesson series. Complete series (multiple career pathways) available at:

77 Washington ABE Math Excerpt: Gas Prices and Capacity Scenario
The trucking company Judy works for wants to save money. So, in addition to wanting the truckers to get from place to place quickly, they are very concerned about fuel costs. The kind of gas trucks use is called diesel. Diesel is more expensive than regular gas. Currently, in 2012, a gallon of diesel is $4.14. The truck Judy drives has a total gas tank capacityof 300 gallons. There are two gas tanks on either side of her truck. (Each gas tank holds 150 gallons.) It costs Judy’s company $1, to fill her two tanks!

78 Washington ABE Math Excerpt: Fuel Consumption
Listen to Juan explain the importance of understanding gas mileage for a full tank of diesel. It might be surprising to you that Judy, Juan and the other truck drivers sometimes get only 6 miles per gallon, and you already know how expensive diesel is! To figure out how many miles Judy can drive with her tanks full (recall that the two tanks when full hold 300 gallons) the equation is: 300 gallons x 6 miles per gallon = number of miles Judy can expect to drive when her two tanks are full

79 Unpacking Washington ABE Math
Workplace context: Mathematics is taught within the context of real calculations that a truck driver might have to do on a regular basis. Relevance to career pathways: Truck driver is the occupation within the Transportation, Distribution & Logistics career cluster.

80 Unpacking Washington ABE Math (continued)
Foundational skills and standards addressed: Work with numbers having up to two decimal places in practical contexts. Translate word problems into simple equations. Technical skills and standards addressed: Trip Planning – Use math to calculate miles, fuel use, and expenses. (PTDI Entry-Level Curriculum Standards) Employability skills and standards addressed: Employ critical thinking to solve problems and make decisions. Please note: Inclusion of standards and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

81 Unpacking Washington ABE Math (continued)
Learner engagement strategies: Relating – Everyone has noticed the price of fuel; anyone with a vehicle is concerned with fuel consumption. Application – Use of decimal multiplication in the context of transportation. Transferring – Recognition of variables in a formula and mathematical operations required to solve problems.

82 Resource 2: Written Communication in the Workplace
From the Michigan Adult Education Professional Development Project Lessons/activities can be implemented by an instructor at any point in an ABE curriculum. Complete series available at:

83 Resource 2: Written Communication in the Workplace
Elements of the curriculum Quotes from employers Vocabulary Downloadable audio files, where applicable Work readiness/Employability skills practice Real-world scenarios Think About It!

84 Excerpt: Communication in the Workplace Learner Guide

85 Excerpt: Communication in the Workplace Instructor Guide

86 Unpacking Communication in the Workplace
Workplace context of the lesson: Writing skills are taught within the context of real employer communication between administrative staff members at two companies. Relevance to career pathways: Administrative Support positions fall within the Business Management & Administration career cluster.

87 Unpacking Communication in the Workplace (continued)
Foundational skills and standards addressed: Express information in written English using clear and grammatically correct structures. Identify the audience for written communication. Recognize the importance of tone in written vs. verbal communication. Please note: Inclusion of standards and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

88 Unpacking Communication in the Workplace (continued)
Technical skills and standards addressed: Maintain work flow to enhance productivity. Prepare documentation of business activities to communicate with internal/external clients. Select appropriate form of written communication to produce a variety of reports. Please note: Inclusion of standards and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

89 Unpacking Communication in the Workplace (continued)
Employability skills and standards addressed: Take responsibility for completing one’s own work assignments accurately and to a high standard of quality. Monitor the quality of own work. Complete tasks on time. Please note: Inclusion of standards and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

90 Unpacking Communication in the Workplace (continued)
Learner engagement strategies: Relating – Most learners will be familiar with ; many will be familiar with abbreviations used when texting. Experiencing – Learners will set up accounts and receive s containing errors. Applying – Learners will identify problems in lesson on communication (grammar, netiquette). Transferring – Learners will correct several s sent to them.

91 Resource 3: Healthcare Career Pathways Bridge (for ABE/ESL)
Minnesota Department of Education and the MN FastTRAC Bridge Project Complete instructional materials available at: Elements: Unit Benchmarks Instructional Materials Culminating Activity Ancillary videos

92 Excerpt: Healthcare Career Pathways Bridge

93 Excerpt: Healthcare Career Pathways Bridge

94 Unpacking Health Care Career Pathways Bridge
Workplace context: Reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills are integrated into a curriculum that teaches basic patient care skills that are applied within a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) job.

95 Unpacking Health Care Career Pathways Bridge (continued)
Relevance to career pathways: Learners encounter new content in a context relevant to their career pathway within the Health Science career cluster. This 15-hour course is a preparatory stage within a health care career pathway. Learners advance by completing bridge level courses leading to employment as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and also to postsecondary education.

96 Unpacking Health Care Career Pathways Bridge (continued)
Foundational basic skills and standards addressed: Select appropriate language for greetings and requests. Use appropriate reading strategies to learn technical concepts and vocabulary. Write responses to questions using correct English grammar and punctuation. Please note: Inclusion of standards and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

97 Unpacking Health Care Career Pathways Bridge (continued)
Technical skills and standards addressed: Help a resident sit up. Help a resident eat. Read and interpret medical charts. Write notes in medical records. Please note: Inclusion of standards and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

98 Unpacking Health Care Career Pathways Bridge (continued)
Employability skills and standards addressed: Evaluate your performance. Evaluate co-workers’ performances. Use polite words. Interact in a professional manner. Please note: Inclusion of standards and concepts addressed by the instructional designers within the example materials does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

99 Unpacking Health Care Career Pathways Bridge (continued)
Learner engagement strategies: Relating – Learning active listening skills in the context of their own life experiences; asking/answering questions. Experiencing – Helping a partner; playing the role of the patient; sitting up in bed; feeding a partner. Applying – Practicing speaking/listening skills with a partner in the context of a health care setting. Cooperating – Working with a partner to complete assigned tasks. Transferring – Using active listening skills in a new context (interviewing a CNA student).

100 Before we move on… What characteristics can you expect to see in the resource you unpack together in your groups? Workplace context Relevance to career pathways Skills, concepts, and standards addressed Learner engagement strategies

101 UNPACKING CURRICULA: YOUR TURN! (SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY)

102 Session 7: Learning Objectives
Participants will: Apply what they have learned and collaboratively unpack an Adult Career Pathway resource. Brainstorm adaptations of the resource that will extend its usefulness in other pathways or instructional settings.

103 Instructions for Group Activity
Each table will be given an instructional resource from the ACP-SC Resource Center. Follow the template provided to unpack the resource as a group. Discuss adaptations for different settings. Answer the reflection questions. Report your table’s conclusions to the entire group.

104 Resources for Unpacking by Small Groups
ABE Writing and Communication: Realtor Role Play GED Math: Calculating Body Mass Index ABE Math: Welding—Cutting Pipe ESL Reading, Listening, Communication: Assembly

105 Template for Unpacking ACP Resource
Lesson Title: Career Pathway: Workplace Context: Courses for Implementation: Skills and Concepts Addressed: Reading, Writing, Listening/Speaking, and Mathematics Technical Employability Learner Engagement Strategies: REACT

106 Stop and Share: As you unpack the resource given to your table, keep the following questions in mind. After your group has completed the unpacking template, come back to these questions and discuss them together. In what settings could this lesson be used? Which of the non-technical skills could easily be taught in the context of other career pathways? What learner engagement strategies would you add to the lesson to increase its effectiveness? Please describe.

107 Before we move on… What questions or comments do you have about this session’s content? processes?

108 PLANNING FOR CONTEXTUALIZED INSTRUCTION

109 Session 8: Learning Objectives
Participants will develop an ABE, ESL, or GED lesson that: Teaches authentic tasks in a workplace context Fits within an Adult Career Pathway Addresses multiple types of skills and standards Includes three of more learner engagement strategies

110 Contextualized Instruction Quick-Start
Select one career pathway scenario from the 16 provided—preferably a pathway matching a local employer or postsecondary program. What is the workplace context? Who are the workers and what is their work? Use your own course syllabus. If possible, work in a interdisciplinary team consisting of an ABE instructor and a career pathway technical instructor. You will both bring your syllabi and relevant standards to the process.

111 Contextualized Instruction Quick-Start (continued)
Determine Learning Objectives for the new lesson. Consider: ABE foundational basic skills Relevant technical skills and standards Employability skills Look for overlap between ABE content and technical/workplace concepts and skills. Where can skills useful to a career pathway be taught or reinforced within an ABE or ESL course? Where can reading, writing, speaking, listening, or mathematics be taught within the technical (career pathway) course?

112 Contextualized Instruction Quick-Start (continued)
The ABC's of Creating Effective Contextualized Work-Based Curricula for ESOL and ABE Classes Friday, March 4, 2011 Contextualized Instruction Quick-Start (continued) Gather all required materials and develop the lesson or unit. Find and/or adapt authentic materials. Develop new materials. Chunk and sequence content. Create assessments.

113 Considerations for Developing Activities
Use real-world data and units of measure. Use multiple modes of conveying information. Provide opportunities for learners to practice employability skills.

114 Business and Industry Advisors Can Help
Business and industry advisors can provide the following: Authentic applications for ABE concepts Real-world scenarios, problems, case-studies Workplace knowledge, skills, and attitudes Assessment ideas Voices from the field—guest speakers

115 Lesson Planning Template
Real-world context Career pathway Workplace context Lesson considerations Learner level(s) Courses for implementation Equipment/materials/texts needed Faculty prerequisite knowledge

116 Lesson Planning Template (continued)
Concepts and skills addressed ABE/ESL foundational basic Technical and industry-specific Employability Skills overlap Collaboration is key Where can basic skills and technical skills be taught within the same lesson? How could employability skills be woven into the lesson?

117 Lesson Planning Template (continued)
Learner outcomes What should learners know or be able to do upon completion of the lesson? Learner engagement strategies (REACT) What types of activities will learners participate in? What engagement strategies do those activities incorporate? Demonstration of learning (learner products) Assessment

118 Lesson Planning Template (continued)
Lesson procedure New documents needed

119 Get started! Materials needed: Your syllabus
Foundational basic skills and technical skills standards Career pathways scenario sheet Multi-page lesson template

120 Before we wrap up… Clarifications on today’s: Content? Processes?
Next steps?

121 Post-Workshop Activities
Register for and check out the Arizona Training private group. 6 weeks out: Post a lesson from the workshop in the Arizona Training private group within the ACP Community. Comment on a colleague’s lesson in the private group. In Spring 2013: Complete the Designing Contextualized Instruction online course. Participate in the online course forum to continue the discussion on contextualized instruction. Participate in the ACP Community public forums of interest (ongoing).

122 For Further Study: Contextualized Instruction Resources
Breaking Through Practice Guide: Contextualization Toolkit Jobs for the Future Basics of Adult Literacy Education Contextual Instruction Course: ABE Career Connections: A Manual for Integrating Adult Basic Education into Career Pathways

123 For Further Study: Instructional Design Resources
Improving Adult Literacy Instruction: Options for Practice and Research Facilitating Student Learning Through Contextualization Dolores Perin, February 2011, CCRC Working Paper No. 29

124 Join Us Questions about today’s session?

125 Contact Information Ann-Claire Anderson Center for Occupational Research and Development Susan Finn Miller Lancaster Lebanon IU13 Michelle Carson Kratos Learning


Download ppt "November 2, 2012 Ann-Claire Anderson Susan Finn Miller."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google