Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) 101 Brief for the DOD's 2014 Taking.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) 101 Brief for the DOD's 2014 Taking."— Presentation transcript:

1 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) 101 Brief for the DOD's 2014 Taking the Pentagon to the People Program at Tuskegee University Janie L. Mines for Dr. Laura Stubbs Director DoD STEM Development Office 27 February 2014

2 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release ASD(R&E) STEM Development Office Background: National and DoD STEM DoD STEM Leadership - DoD STEM Executive Board SDO STEM Portfolio – STEM Resources: National Defense Education Program (NDEP) – Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation (SMART) – National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship (NSSEFF) – NDEP K-12 SMART – Overview SMART Context – Demand Signals Graduate Degrees Awarded to SMART Participants Back Up Briefing Outline 2

3 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release STEM Development Office ASD(R&E) - Four Research and Engineering Imperatives Accelerate the delivery of technical capabilities to win the current fight; Prepare for an uncertain future; Reduce the cost, acquisition time, and risk of major defense acquisition programs; and Develop world class science, technology, engineering and math capabilities for the DoD and the Nation. Most senior-level individual in the DoD for S&T scholarship programs Lead all aspects of STEM initiatives Lead OSD collaborative efforts with Military Services and Defense Agencies – formulation of policies and practices to achieve STEM objectives Manage National Defense Education Program SDO Director – Wears Many Hats: The Secretary of Defense shall identify actions and establish and conduct programs to improve education and training in the scientific, mathematics, and engineering skills necessary to meet long-term defense needs. (10 USC 2192) OSTP and inter-agency coordination - Align with NSTC Federal STEM Education 5-Year Strategic Plan DoD STEM Leadership STEM Executive Board, Execute DoD STEM Strategic and Implementation Plans STEM investments – NDEP, Portfolio of DoD investments Utilize DoD Technical Workforce Model – analytics: workforce and education data SDO Priorities

4 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release NATIONAL AND DOD STEM Background:

5 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release STEM Skills are Linked with U.S. Competitiveness Historical milestones – STEM competitiveness 1957 – Sputnik on-going supply/demand debates about the STEM workforce 1983 – A Nation at Risk lambasted the U.S. educational system 1995 – Congressional hearings about NSFs deeply flawed S&E shortages forecasts – NIH budget doubles 2001 – dot com bust 2007 – Rising Above the Gathering Storm (Pre-publication 2006) 2007 – America COMPETES Act (among other things, created Presidents Council on Innovation and Competitiveness) 2009 & 2013 – Presidents State of the Union – STEM a priority 2010 – America COMPETES Act (among other things, required OSTP to establish a committee to coordinate Federal STEM education programs and activities) 2011 – Rising above the Gathering Storm Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5 (pre-publication in 2010) Priorities 1)Improve STEM instruction (Lead agency: ED) 2)Increase and sustain youth and public engagement in STEM (Lead agency: Smithsonian Institution) 3)Enhance STEM experience of undergraduate students (Lead agency: NSF) 4)Better serve groups historically under- represented in STEM fields (Lead agency: TBD) 5)Design graduate education for tomorrows STEM workforce (Lead agency: NSF) STEM Education Coordination Approaches 1)Build new models for leveraging assets and expertise. 2)Build and use evidence-based approaches. Federal STEM Education 5-Year Strategic Plan Crisis: (1) Aging STEM workforce (2) U.S. industry unable to obtain high-quality workers with necessary skills (3) STEM diversity Policy directions : (1) Increase H-1B visas and (2) Increase U.S. participation in STEM Government AcademiaIndustry Federal role – integrate STEM approaches across sectors to improve U.S. competitiveness

6 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release PCAST* Report: Prepare and Inspire K-12 PCAST* Report: Prepare and Inspire K-12 CoSTEM formed PCAST* Report: Engage to Excel Undergraduate Education PCAST* Report: Engage to Excel Undergraduate Education CoSTEM Report – Inventory of Federal STEM Investments SEP 2010 FEB 2011 JAN 2012 FEB 2012 CoSTEM Report – Coordinating Federal STEM Investments Key Milestones Shaping National Level STEM APR 2013 OMB FY 2014 PBR – Reorganization of Federal STEM investments [the PBR] [p]repares students for careers in STEM-related fields by reorganizing and restructuring Federal STEM education programs to make better use of resources and improve outcomes; and invests in recruiting and preparing 100,000 STEM teachers and creating a new STEM Master Teachers Corps to improve STEM instruction. ~ PBR FY 2014 – Overview: Equipping Americans with the Skills they Need [the PBR] [p]repares students for careers in STEM-related fields by reorganizing and restructuring Federal STEM education programs to make better use of resources and improve outcomes; and invests in recruiting and preparing 100,000 STEM teachers and creating a new STEM Master Teachers Corps to improve STEM instruction. ~ PBR FY 2014 – Overview: Equipping Americans with the Skills they Need MAY 2007 Department of Education Report: Academic Competitiveness Council *PCAST: Presidents Council of Advisors on Science and Technology No DoD STEM investments reported GAO Report – STEM Strategic Planning Needed MAY 2013 NSTC - CoSTEM Federal STEM Education 5-Year Strategic Plan GAO Report: Federal STEM Programs and Related Trends Higher Education OCT 2005 STEM interest spurred by the National Academies 2007 publication (pre- publication 2006): Rising above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future.

7 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Veterans: ~40% of the DoD civilian workforce 36% of those in STEM occupations Overall, 66% of civilians in STEM occupational series hold a bachelors or higher degree, among the largest STEM occupational categories (68% of STEM): Engineering: 14% veterans; 98% bachelors or higher 92% in STEM (5% in business) Computer science and information technology: 49% veterans; 48% bachelors or higher 64% in STEM (24% in business) Program management: 49% veterans; 58% bachelors or higher 27% in STEM (50% in business) One-third of DoDs Civilian Workforce is in a STEM Occupational Series The DoD STEM Occupational Taxonomy – Civilian organizes ~110 occupational series into 12 categories. To get more vets into STEM – need to increase educational attainment of Service members.

8 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Future U.S. and DoD STEM Workforce Capacity is Dependent on Diversity Source: SDO analysis of data from U.S. Census Bureau Statistical Abstract of the United States: Shown are 2009 employment data for the civilian non-institutionalized population aged 16 and older. Innovation thrives on diversity (Herring 2009 and Kochan et al 2003) and the labor force is increasingly diverse U.S. corporations like Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, and Boeing have invested in a diverse STEM workforce Women are 47% of the U.S. workforce, 25% of U.S. STEM workforce and 28% of DoD STEM workforce 25% of U.S. workforce is African American and Latino but only 12% of U.S. STEM and 16% of DoD STEM workforces Source: SDO analysis of FY 2012 year-end Defense Manpower Data Center Civilian data, run 5 June U.S. Workforce DoD Civilian Workforce

9 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Over the next decade, the U.S. will fall far short of meeting projected demand for bachelors- degreed computer science graduates – DoD has not sufficiently tapped women and minorities for these jobs. 2.1 M Computing Jobs are in High Demand – with Potential Serious National, Federal and DoD Supply Shortfalls through 2020 Ethnic Composition of Computer Science Bachelors Recipients, 1991 and 2011 Ethnic diversity of DoDs civilian employees with bachelors degrees in computer science (CS) is slightly better than recent graduating seniors. But representation of women with CS bachelors degrees is lower – 26% vs. 34%. Gender Composition of Computer Science Bachelors Recipients, 1991 and 2011 Source: SDO analysis of Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) degree data accessed via National Science Foundation (NSF) WebCASPAR database. Degree projections based on 2011 bachelor's degree earning rates by age, sex, race, Hispanic origin and citizenship from U.S. Census Bureau population estimates for July 1, The median time to a bachelor's degree is six years. Demand was based on occupational replacement rates derived from estimates by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Shown are cumulative distributions of projections from DoD data are SDO analysis of DMDC year-end 2012 data.

10 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release DoD Mission Critical Computing Occupations - Demography Veterans Info Tech: 58% Comp Sci: 19% Eligible to Retire within 5 Years Info Tech: 31% Comp Sci: 24% Recruitment and retention challenges 2210 (Information Technology Management) differs compared to 1550 (Computer Science) Much larger occupational series Age profile is a mountain, not a bathtub Education: Typically less than bachelors degree but varies greatly within 2210s 12 career categories Greater representation of veterans More likely to be eligible to retire in the next 5 years 2210: Federal-Wide and DoD Mission Critical Occupation

11 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Workforce Needs Drive DoD STEM Efforts STEM skills and knowledge underpin DoD mission – Mission-essential workforce needs E.g., nuclear engineers, energetics SMEs, Naval architects – Mission Critical Occupations (MCOs) E.g., information technology, electronics and computer engineering Aging workforce: impending retirement wave and bathtub demographics profile Gender, ethnicity, and race: to meet future STEM workforce needs, DoD must foster and attract a more diverse population of STEM-competent employees Veterans provide critical STEM skills to meet DoD workforce needs efficiently – e.g., information technology – Need to develop strong transition mechanism DoD funds STEM investments in disciplines that are critical to national security

12 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release DOD STEM EXECUTIVE BOARD DoD STEM Leadership

13 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release DoD STEM Executive Board Organization Representation STEM Development Office USD(I) [DHCMO] USD(P&R) [DASD(C&)] STEM Working Group DoD STEM Executive Board (DASD(R) Chair) USD(AT&L) [DASD(SE) & DAHCI] Department of Navy [CNR] U.S. Army [DASA(RT)] U.S. Air Force [DASAFA(ST&E)] Broadly improve STEM skills of students so as to expand and enhance the pool of individuals who might one day be able to contribute directly to DoDs mission Attract students to STEM fields relevant to future DoD workforce needs and career opportunities, both military and civilian Ensure development of a sufficient supply of people with specific, unique DoD-essential STEM skills Foster continuous STEM capability improvements for DoD employees DoD STEM Executive Board To ensure that the Department has enduring access to a highly competent STEM workforce essential to deliver innovative solutions for the Nation's current and future defense challenges:

14 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release DoD STEM Strategic Plan Provides Direction and Guides Investments Approach 1)The DoD STEM Executive Board is responsible for execution and implementation of this Plan. 2)The Board will baseline workforce requirements, investments, and policy. 3)The Working Group will report annually to the Board on the achievement of these goals and objectives in accordance with Government Performance and Results Act. 4)The Board will make data-driven recommendations and decisions as necessary in alignment with the Program Objective Memorandum (POM) cycle. Vision A diverse, world-class STEM talent pool and workforce with the creativity and agility to meet national defense needs. Mission Ensure the Department has enduring access to a highly competent STEM workforce essential to deliver innovative solutions for the Nation's current and future defense challenges. Goals 1)Attract, develop, and retain a highly competent DoD STEM workforce, based on DoD requirements. 2)Maximize effectiveness of DoD STEM investments. 3)Codify DoD STEM policy.

15 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Alignment: Federal and DoD STEM Strategic Plans Federal STEM Education 5-Year Strategic Plan DoD STEM Strategic Plan Vision The U.S. has a well-qualified and increasingly diverse STEM workforce able to lead innovation in STEM-related industries and to fulfill CoSTEM agency workforce needs; American students have access to excellent P-12, postsecondary, and informal STEM education and learning opportunities; and Federal STEM education programs are based on evidence and are coordinated for maximum impact in priority areas. Vision: A diverse, world-class STEM talent pool and workforce with the creativity and agility to meet national defense needs. Mission: Ensure the Department has enduring access to a highly competent STEM workforce essential to deliver innovative solutions for the Nations current and future defense challenges. Goal 1: Improve STEM Instruction. (Lead agency: Department of Education) Goal 2: Increase and sustain youth and public engagement in STEM. (Lead agency: Smithsonian Institution) Goal 1: Attract, develop, and retain a highly competent DoD STEM workforce, based on DoD requirements. Objective 1.1: Develop and foster an engaged and diverse STEM talent pool. Goal 3: Enhance STEM experience of undergraduate students. (Lead agency: National Science Foundation) Goal 1: Attract, develop, and retain a highly competent DoD STEM workforce, based on DoD requirements. Objective 1.2: Attract and recruit a proficient, agile and effective STEM workforce. Goal 4: Better serve groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields (Lead agency: TBD) Goal 1: Attract, develop, and retain a highly competent DoD STEM workforce, based on DoD requirements. Objective 1.3: Retain a highly competent and diverse DoD STEM workforce. Goal 5: Design graduate education for tomorrows STEM workforce. (Lead agency: National Science Foundation) Goal 1, Objective 1.2: Attract and recruit a proficient, agile and effective STEM workforce. Approaches(1)Build new models for leveraging assets and expertise. (2)Build and use evidence-based approaches. Goal 2: Maximize effectiveness of DoD STEM investments. The STEM Development Office will facilitate work of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD(R&E))s STEM Executive Board and its Working Group. [1] [1] In alignment with the Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education (CoSTEM) efforts.

16 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION PROGRAM SDO STEM Portfolio – STEM Resources:

17 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release ASD(R&E) Investments in STEM STUDENTS - TEACHERS – SCHOOLS – INSTITUTES FOR HIGHER EDUCATION - COMMUNITIES - MEDIA - PUBLIC PRE-K & ELEMENTARY JUNIOR HIGH HIGH SCHOOL BACHELORSMASTERSDOCTORALFACULTY K-12 EDUCATION* ASSURE SE CAPSTONE SMART* HBCU / MI PROGRAM BASIC RESEARCH NSSEFF* PECASE VISION: A diverse, world-class STEM talent pool with the creativity and agility to meet national defense needs NDSEG * Indicates NDEP Component

18 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release National Defense Education Program Purpose ComponentPurpose Science, Mathematics, And Research for Transformation ( SMART ) Scholarship-for-service in STEM disciplines to educate, train, and retain DoDs future technical workforce National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship ( NSSEFF ) Support scientific research that defines and advances emerging fields and may lead to breakthroughs for DoD; foster long term relationships between leading university researchers and DoD Pre-kindergarten-12 ( PK-12 ) Build the STEM talent pool by connecting students, teachers and schools with DoD STEM professionals and research facilities To attract, engage and develop current and future generations of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent to benefit DoDs mission. FFRDCs (e.g. Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) Non-Profits (e.g., FIRST, MATHCOUNTS) Military Services and DoD Components DoD Laboratories U.S. Colleges and Universities Program Partners

19 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART OVERVIEW 19

20 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART – Bottom Line Up Front Science Mathematics And Research for Transformation 20 SMART is a Scholarship-for-Service program designed to produce the next generation DoD S&T Leaders S&T / STEM workforce is aging/retiring Educational and internship expenses paid for by the program The SMART Program: Provides funding to allow Participants to focus on school Provides Participants with experience and exposure to DoD facilities and the DoD culture prior to graduation Provides incentive for Participants to enter and work (recruitment) and current DoD employees (retention) to remain at DoD facilities Establish SMART Authorities (Directive Type Memorandum, DoDI, Privacy Act, etc.) Selected 142 new SMART awardees for Cohort size based on available funding and continuing commitments Requirements come directly from the Sponsoring Facilities Increase STEM (including SMART) efficiency – increased retention of STEM professionals 84% of SMART participants are retained in DoD employment beyond their service commitment 97% of RT PurposeApproach New SMART Awardees per Year (All Degree Levels) 2005 was a pilot SMART annual funding is impacted by financial commitments required to sustain previous multi-year awards Increased funding requirements to sustain previous multi-year awards w/o commensurate funding increases reduced number of new awards SMART Funding (All Degree Levels) Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Program Office, October, 2013.

21 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release U.S. citizen 18 years of age or older Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) Pursuing degree in one of 19 approved STEM disciplines with interest in research Can accept both recruitment (new) and retention (current DoD employees) as scholars Ability to obtain/maintain a security clearance Ability to complete 8-12 week summer internships Willing to accept post- graduation employment w/DoD SMART Scholarship Overview 21 Eligibility Requirements Participant (Scholar) Benefits Full tuition and fees (up to five years) for AA (very rare), BS, MS, and PhD degrees at any accredited college or university in the U.S. Annual stipend from $25,000 to $38,000 (Prior to 2012: $25,000 to $41,800) Security clearance (SECRET) Paid Summer internships (average 10 weeks) Book and health insurance allowances Experienced Mentor at a DoD Facility Post-graduation employment At least 1:1 Post-Graduation Service Commitment

22 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART Graduate Students and Degrees 22 Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Program Office, October, 2013.

23 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART CONTEXT – DEMAND SIGNALS 23

24 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Context: Educational Level of DoD New Hires, FY 2000 and FY 2012 The education level of DoD new hires has increased since Source: SDO analysis of Defense Manpower Data Center, Civilian Personnel File, September 30, 2000 and September 30,

25 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release DoD Civilian New Hires with Graduate Degrees – Fields of Study, Source: SDO analysis of Defense Manpower Data Center, Civilian Personnel File, September 30, Fields of Degrees: Masters-Degreed New Hires, 2012 (n = 3,580) Fields of Degrees: Doctoral-Degreed New Hires, 2012 (n = 786) Note: S&E degree fields include the 19 SMART disciplines and all other areas of science and engineering as defined by the National Science Foundation. At the masters level, DoD hires similar numbers of S&Es and business majors but at the doctoral level, S&Es account for more than other degree fields.

26 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Degree Fields of Masters-Degreed DoD Civilian New Hires, 2000 and Source: SDO analysis of Defense Manpower Data Center, Civilian Personnel File, September 30, 2000 and September 30, DoD hired substantially more masters of business, computer/info sciences and engineering in 2012 versus 2000.

27 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Degree Fields of Doctoral-Degreed DoD Civilian New Hires, 2000 and Source: SDO analysis of Defense Manpower Data Center, Civilian Personnel File, September 30, 2000 and September 30, DoD hired substantially more doctors of business, computer/info sciences and engineering in 2012 versus 2000.

28 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Bachelors and Masters Newhires in SMART Degree Fields Source: SDO analysis of Defense Manpower Data Center, Civilian Personnel File, September 30, 2000 and September 30, Occupational Field Categories Aligned with DoD STEM Taxonomy - Civilian 28

29 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART Requirements* Generation 29 Requirements are approved and prioritized by a SMART board for each Service Each sponsoring facility is requested to determine the following for each requirement: Number of scholars Disciplines (19 SMART disciplines) Degree level (Bachelors, Masters, PhD) Duty site Each sponsoring facility is required to commit to: Provide a summer internship assignment Provide a mentor Place SMART participants into a permanent position upon graduation * Demand signal from sponsoring facilities

30 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release 30 Graduate Degrees Awarded to SMART Participants

31 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART Sponsoring Facilities 2013 Graduate Demand Signal 31 Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Service Liaisons, August, 2013.

32 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Graduate Degree Award Data 32 SMART participants predominantly attend civilian institutions Only 9 of 465 attended AFIT or NPS 3 retention 6 recruitment 456 – attended one of 140 civilian institutions Masters and Doctoral Graduates in SMART Top Two Science and Top Two Engineering Fields Top 25 institutions based on 2014 U.S. News and World Report rankings of U.S. graduate programs. Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Program Office, October, 2013.

33 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART Sponsoring Facilities Demand Signal and Overall Graduate Degree Outcomes 33 Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Service Liaisons, August, 2013.

34 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Institutions the have Conferred Degrees to SMART Scholars – Ranked by Largest Number of SMART Degrees within Level 34 Doctoral Degree InstitutionsMasters Degree Institutions Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Program Office, October, 2013.

35 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Universities Conferring Degrees in Top Two SMART Sciences Fields (Demand) 35 Shading indicates institutions in the most recent (2014) list of top programs by U.S. News Computer and Computational Sciences – One degree each Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Program Office, October, 2013.

36 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Universities the have Conferred Degrees to SMART Scholars in Top Two SMART Engineering Fields (Based on Demand) 36 Shading indicates institutions in the most recent (2014) list of top programs by U.S. News Source: SDO analysis of data provided by SMART Program Office, October, 2013.

37 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release BACKUP SLIDES 37

38 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release SMART Authorities: Title 10 U.S.C. Section 2192a 38

39 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Defense Manpower Data Center, Civilian Personnel Files, September 30, 2000 and 2012: unit record data on DoD civilian personnel – year-end files. SMART Service Liaisons: data on demand requested from sponsoring facilities. The four SMART Service Liaisons (Army, Navy, Air Force and 4 th Estate) provide connections between the program office, students, and the sponsoring facilities. SMART Program Office: data typically pulled from the SMART Information Management System (database). Data Sources 39

40 Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Additional SMART Information For general program information 40


Download ppt "Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) 101 Brief for the DOD's 2014 Taking."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google