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Gregory Marchildon, University of Regina Jennifer Verma, CHSRF David Secko, Concordia University Erik Landriault, CIHR-IHSPR Annual CAHSPR Conference May.

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Presentation on theme: "Gregory Marchildon, University of Regina Jennifer Verma, CHSRF David Secko, Concordia University Erik Landriault, CIHR-IHSPR Annual CAHSPR Conference May."— Presentation transcript:

1 Gregory Marchildon, University of Regina Jennifer Verma, CHSRF David Secko, Concordia University Erik Landriault, CIHR-IHSPR Annual CAHSPR Conference May 30, 2012

2 Introduce EvidenceNetwork.ca Writing a Snappy OpEd OpEds as a KT vehicle What are OpEd editors looking for? Traditional media vs. Online publishers Beginners Inventory of Popular Outlets YOUR TURN! 1

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4 Links journalists with health policy experts to provide access to credible, evidence-based information. 3

5 To get your research out To set the record straight To counter a growing belief that is not based on, or even counter to the evidence (myth-busting) To exercise your full citizenship 4

6 Opposite the Editorial Pages (OpEd) Key Perimeters: Focus on a single or few major points/arguments Succinct (650-750 words) Timely (newsworthy) Compelling, convincing and conversational Draw from strong evidence (noting, research on its own rarely changes minds) Jargon- and citation-free (but not evidence-free!) Provide a solution or steps toward a solution (What needs to be done?) along with the key players (Who needs to do it?) 5

7 6 THE LATEST RESEARCH SHOWS THAT WE REALLY SHOULD DO SOMETHING WITH ALL THIS RESEARCH

8 Knowledge translation is about: Making users aware of knowledge and facilitating their use of it to improve health and health care systems Closing the gap between what we know and what we do (reducing the know-do gap) Moving knowledge into action 7

9 Knowledge Translation is something that most researchers are already doing, to some extent. Researchers who: publish their research findings tell other researchers about their work present their work at conferences ……are engaged in at least one part of the process we call knowledge translation: disseminating the results of their work to their peers 8

10 Consistent evidence of failure to translate research findings into clinical practice: 30-45% patients do not get treatments of proven effectiveness 20–25% patients get care that is not needed or potentially harmful (McGlynn et al, 2003; Grol R, 2001; Schuster, McGlynn, Brook, 1998) Cancer outcomes could be improved by 30% with optimum application of what is currently known 10% reduction in cancer mortality with widespread use of available therapies (CSCC 2001; Ford et al, 1990) 9

11 A broad spectrum of activities including: Diffusion (let it happen) Dissemination (help it happen) activities that tailor the message and medium to a specific audience Application (make it happen) moving research into practice/policy in cases where the strength of evidence is sufficient 10

12 Some filters that editors use when considering opinion: 1. Can the writer claim expertise on the topic? 2. Is the argument refreshing without being perilous to the publication? 3. Can the argument be connected to current events or news? Alterative structural view: 1. Starts with a provocative statement; 2. Provocative statement is contrasted against what is at stake; 3. Supporting information answers everything that might immediately come to a readers mind; 4. A recap elaborates on the provocative statement. 11

13 Multimediality, interactivity and hypertextuality Blended journalism Editorial Staff Authority Speed Audience Content + Distribution + Credibility 12 Secko. JPM 10(2&3): 261 (2009)

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15 14 Connect with news media that report on health (e.g., Globe and Mail, Hamilton Spectator) and publish analyses, opinion and editorial content (e.g., Troy Media, Huffington Post, The Mark) Put a Creative Commons on the content – reprints in small community, rural, niche, ethnic and online media across the country Remember Grey Literature (e.g., NGO newsletters, websites, magazines) Get a double run by translating

16 Form a team > Pick a theme (4) Review materials (news article, Mythbusters) Develop key points for an OpEd Report back Compare EvidenceNetwork.ca expert OpEds Wrap up and closing thoughts 15

17 Aging Population and its Potential Impact Healthcare Costs and Spending More Care is Not Always Better Health is More than Healthcare Private, For-Profit Solutions to Funding and Delivery Patient Financing of Healthcare (The Patient Pays) Sustainability Waiting for Care 16

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19 News: Explore all funding options for health care, says outgoing CMA head (Postmedia News, Aug 12, 2011) http://www.canada.com/business/Explore+funding+options+health+care+says+outgoing+head/528 8501/story.html http://www.canada.com/business/Explore+funding+options+health+care+says+outgoing+head/528 8501/story.html Research Summary: Myth: User Fees Would Stop Waste and Ensure Better Use of the Healthcare System (CHSRF, 2001) http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth4_e.pdfhttp://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth4_e.pdf Op-Ed: Making patients pay wont make our health system more affordable (2011-2012) by Raisa Deber and Noralou Roos, published in the The Toronto Star and The Montréal Gazette http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4380 http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4380 18

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24 What central focus will your OpEd take? Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How might you open and close the OpEd? What are your key lines of argument? Facts? What other research, evidence or sources would you like to consider? Whats the greatest struggle you face in preparing/publishing this OpEd? 23

25 What central focus will your OpEd take? Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How might you open and close the OpEd? What are your key lines of argument? Facts? What other research, evidence or sources would you like to consider? Whats the greatest struggle you face in preparing/publishing this OpEd? 24

26 25 What central focus did they take? Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How did they open and close the OpEd? What are their key lines of argument? Facts? What other research, evidence or sources did they consider? Other thoughts

27 THANK YOU! NOW, ITS YOUR TURN! 26

28 Population aging and fiscal sustainability News : Canadas aging population will strain the health-care system (Feb 6, 2012) http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/canadas-aging-population- will-strain-the-health-care-system/article2326529/ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/canadas-aging-population- will-strain-the-health-care-system/article2326529/ Research Summary: Myth: The Aging Population is to Blame for Uncontrollable Healthcare Costs (2011) http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth_AgingPopulation_EN_FINAL_1.sflb.ashx http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth_AgingPopulation_EN_FINAL_1.sflb.ashx Op-Ed: We can sustain our health care systemheres how (2011-2012) by Neena Chappell, published in the Hill Times, Calgary Herald and the Halifax Chronicle Herald http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4641 http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4641 27

29 Mammography screening News : Mammography harm 'underappreciated Decline in breast cancer deaths from therapy, not screening (Apr 2, 2012) http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/04/02/mammography- overdiagnosis-breast-cancer.html http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/04/02/mammography- overdiagnosis-breast-cancer.html Research Summary: Myth: Early detection is good for everyone (2006) http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth22_e.pdf and Myth: Whole- body screening is an effective way to detect hidden cancers (2009) http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/11491_newsletter_en.pdf http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth22_e.pdfhttp://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/11491_newsletter_en.pdf Op-Ed: Small benefits, substantial harms with mammography screening by Cornelia Baines, published in The National Post and Huffington Post http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4490 http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4490 28

30 Activity-based hospital funding News: Financer (enfin) les hôpitaux au rendement (01 mars 2012) http://www.cyberpresse.ca/debats/editoriaux/201202/29/01-4501135-financer-enfin-les- hopitaux-au-rendement.php and Activity-based hospital funding: boon or boondoggle? (May 20, 2008) http://www.cmaj.ca/content/178/11/1407.full.pdf http://www.cyberpresse.ca/debats/editoriaux/201202/29/01-4501135-financer-enfin-les- hopitaux-au-rendement.php http://www.cmaj.ca/content/178/11/1407.full.pdf Research Summary: Myth: Activity-Based Funding Leads to For-Profit Hospital Care (2012) http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth-ABF-leads-to-profit-E.sflb.ashx http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth-ABF-leads-to-profit-E.sflb.ashx Op-Ed: New hospital funding models not without risks (2012) by Jason Sutherland and M. Trafford Crump, published in the Hill Times and the Calgary Beacon http://beaconnews.ca/calgary/2012/02/why-we-never-seem-to- have-enough-hospital-beds-in-canada/http://beaconnews.ca/calgary/2012/02/why-we-never-seem-to- have-enough-hospital-beds-in-canada/ 29

31 Generic vs. Brand drugs News: Generic Drugs vs. Brand Name Drugs (Sept, 2011) http://www.readersdigest.ca/health/sickness-prevention/generic-drugs-vs-brand-name-drugs Research Summary: Myth: Generic Drugs are Lower- quality and Less Safe Than Brandname Drugs (2007) http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth_Generic_drugs_are_lower_quality_EN_FINAL.sflb.a shx http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth_Generic_drugs_are_lower_quality_EN_FINAL.sflb.a shx Op-Ed: Designer drugs: Youre really paying for the name (2012) by Alan Cassels, published in the Huffington Post and the Hill Times http: //umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4764 and The $2-billion extra price tag of brand-name drugs in Canadaand Our Surprisingly Expensive Pharmaceuticals (2011) by Marc-André Gagnon, published in the Hill Times and The Mark News (respectively) http://www.themarknews.com/articles/4789-our-surprisingly-expensive-pharmaceuticals http: //umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4764 http://www.themarknews.com/articles/4789-our-surprisingly-expensive-pharmaceuticals 30


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