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Session 191 Working with the News Media Session 19 Slide Deck Slide 19-

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Presentation on theme: "Session 191 Working with the News Media Session 19 Slide Deck Slide 19-"— Presentation transcript:

1 Session 191 Working with the News Media Session 19 Slide Deck Slide 19-

2 Session 192 Session Objectives 19.1Discuss the importance of working with traditional and new media 19.2Examine how news operations work 19.3Identify whos who in a TV newsroom 19.4Discuss how to build relationships with news reporters 19.5Discuss the keys to successful media outreach Slide 19-

3 Working with the Media Core to effective crisis communications 24/7 news gathering and dissemination Broadly accessible and not controlled by the government agency New media technologies and citizen journalists Three parties Session 193 Slide 19-

4 Communications Lessons Learned from Katrina Novel channels and networks for information flow Top-down paradigm replaced by a more dynamic flow of information New cadre of first informers Greater access to operational leaders and experts and more transparency by government Session 194 Slide 19-

5 Traditional Media Approach to New Media If you cant beat them, join them Forming partnerships Augment, enrich, deepen, and even replace their own coverage The audience is an active participant Publish, then filter Session 195 Slide 19-

6 Government Reaction to New Media Slow to recognize or embrace the role of new media Trouble with mainstream media filter Session 196 Slide 19-

7 Slidell Hurricane Damage Blog Posted the blog from Dallas Aggregating information from other sources Friends and neighbors became contributors Local sheriff s office 80,000 unique visitors in the first week Session 197 Slide 19-

8 The Never-Ending News Cycle Was generally 8 to 24 hours Is never over – Its never too late Blog at home in the evenings, on weekends News cycle instantaneous and the newsroom a 24/7 operation Multi-purpose their news gathering efforts Report now - retract later Session 198 Slide 19-

9 Reporters and Social Media Reporters now write their story, do a web version, blog and post audio and video Ceaseless demand File a web story as well as a regular story Blog everyday Audio recorder and video camera Session 199 Slide 19-

10 Citizen Reporting Respect whats being generated online by the public: the media does Viewer and reader submissions Feature requests and portals for citizen information and images Television –CNNs iReport –Assignment Desk –Tutorials on storytelling –CNN spawned a variety of similar initiatives Session 1910 Slide 19-

11 Radio The Conversation Online meeting place Forums on news topics Social network attempts to meet two needs –Communicate directly –Helps reporters and producers build networks of sources and ideas Session 1911 Slide 19-

12 Story Mining Reporters mine online content for story ideas and sources Pay attention to the web Quality and credibility Recognize the contribution –We cant be everywhere at once. –Story ideas Pitch and promote your stories Session 1912 Slide 19-

13 Gatekeeping Newsrooms decide whats news several times a day Story or editorial meetings –Local morning meeting –Local afternoon meetings –Network news Timely pitch for coverage Session 1913 Slide 19-

14 Whos who: Station Manager Large stations: –Administration and financial management Small stations: –Sets policy on news coverage –Supervises overall operation –Generally does not influence daily content Session 1914 Slide 19-

15 Whos who: Program Manager Large stations: –Manages programming mix All stations: –Unlikely to be involved in daily news decisions Session 1915 Slide 19-

16 Whos who: News Director All stations: –Administrative manager –Daily assignment director, or –On-air broadcaster Small stations: –More influence Session 1916 Slide 19-

17 Whos who: Assignment Editor Large stations: –Makes day-to-day decisions on: What breaking news to cover Who will report on it Small stations: –News director is the assignment editor Session 1917 Slide 19-

18 Whos who: Executive Producer Lead person On-air host Session 1918 Slide 19-

19 Whos who: Producer Overall tone and content Book guests Assign news crews Session 1919 Slide 19-

20 Whos who: Public Affairs Director Public service announcements Community outreach Special programming Session 1920 Slide 19-

21 Whos who: Reporters Covers stories Small stations: –News staff of TV stations are usually smaller than daily newspapers –Beats are often less defined Large stations: –Reporters will have traditional beats like; Politics Arts Education –Breaking news Session 1921 Slide 19-

22 The Scoop on TV News Operations: Local Stations Downsizing Over-taxed and under-capitalized Under-staffed, under-funded, and have very high turnover rate Reporters learning on the job Reporters doing their own camera work Session 1922 Slide 19-

23 The Scoop on TV News Operations: Local Stations Contribute to multiple broadcasts Provide background to the reporter Reporter may not even go to the event being covered Session 1923 Slide 19-

24 The Scoop on TV News Operations: Large Markets More resources Experienced reporters Session 1924 Slide 19-

25 The Scoop on TV News Operations: The Networks More people & equipment than any local station Ability to plan ahead Interviewee has extra time to prepare and practice Less likely to encounter a network Session 1925 Slide 19-

26 Develop professional relationships with local reporters Create a comprehensive media list –Identify reporters name –Send that reporter an –Follow up with an intro call –Do not have to make a cold call Session 1926 Slide 19-

27 Develop professional relationships with local reporters Pitching a story idea to a newspaper –Be friendly and inquisitive –Ask for the assignment editor –Grow your list Session 1927 Slide 19-

28 Develop professional relationships with local reporters Take reporter to lunch or coffee. –More time to connect and provide in-depth information –Focus on the issue –Different compelling story pitches, from different angles –Assemble materials in a folder that the reporter can keep Fact sheets Reports Human interest bios of your staff or volunteers Past press clips on the issue at hand List of upcoming campaign events Session 1928 Slide 19-

29 Develop professional relationships with local reporters Identify individual at local radio stations responsible for Public Service Announcements (PSAs) –Free air time –Stations announcer may read it –Create buzz and visibility Session 1929 Slide 19-

30 Media Outreach Keys to successful media outreach Match your story to the media outlet Media outreach checklist How to get media coverage What does TV want Interview tips Appearing on TV Session 1930 Slide 19-

31 Media Outreach: Keys to Success Relationship building –Will not be dealing with these news organizations just once –Many stories –Call this reporter again – and you want the reporter to call you –Never lie –Do not know an answer, admit it and tell the reporter you will get back –Get back when you say you will Session 1931 Slide 19-

32 Media Outreach: Keys to Success Tell the story well –Use compelling visuals –Imagery and action. –Credible, prepared and attractive messengers Session 1932 Slide 19-

33 Media Outreach: Keys to Success Get the message out –Know the message One thing do you want the viewer to remember Exact sound bytes You are in control –Start with your conclusion –Wrong way –Right Way –Give specifics if time allows –Cant edit or cut short your message Session 1933 Slide 19-

34 Media Outreach: Keys to Success Keep is short –Sound bites 1960s – 40 seconds 1980s – 20 seconds Now – 8 seconds –Long sound bites will be edited –Law of diminishing returns Session 1934 Slide 19-

35 Media Outreach: Keys to Success Be consistent and disciplined –Repeat your message –Cut through the clutter –Consistent message Session 1935 Slide 19-

36 Media Outreach: Keys to Success Use everyday, value-laden language –Avoid jargon, acronyms and talking about process –Values of your target audience Session 1936 Slide 19-

37 Media Outreach: Keys to Success Remember who youre talking to – and its not the reporter –Not your friend or a debating partner –Conversation with a larger audience Session 1937 Slide 19-

38 Media Outreach: How do you get media coverage? Pitch the story Hold a news conference Stage an event Piggyback on another news event or news story Generate copy yourself Session 1938 Slide 19-

39 Media Outreach: What does TV want? Stand-up interview at an event –Short and low tech –Pulled aside –Wont be a lot of time –Talk to the reporter before the interview starts –Be prepared ahead of time. –Talk about what you know Session 1939 Slide 19-

40 Media Outreach: What does TV want? Sit-down one-on-one interview –Lasts longer & goes more in-depth –Time to talk to the reporter –Time to prepare –Prepare your office Session 1940 Slide 19-

41 Media Outreach: What does TV want? Remote Live-Shot –Most high-tech and maybe most intimidating –Conversing with someone they cant see –Be talking to an inanimate object, the camera –Wireless microphone and an IFB –Often (but not always) on live television –Preparing no different Session 1941 Slide 19-

42 Media Outreach: How do I match my story to a media outlet? Core question: Is it news? –Disaster –Non-disaster period –Tough sell Session 1942 Slide 19-

43 Media Outreach: How do I match my story to a media outlet? Who do I call? –Assignment editor at a TV station. –Individual reporters at newspapers and magazines. –Producer of a newsmaker show Session 1943 Slide 19-

44 Media Outreach: How do I match my story to a media outlet? Holding a news conference –Send an advisory 5 days ahead by fax –Call to make sure its arrived and been noticed –Make your pitch (work off a printed pitch memo) –Get a NAME – always get a name –Send another advisory 2 days ahead –Call to make sure its arrived and been noticed –Ask if they intend to cover –Call the day before the event and the morning of –Ask if they intend to cover Session 1944 Slide 19-

45 Media Outreach: How do I match my story to a media outlet? Press kit –News release –Fact sheet –Bios of the speakers –Visuals: Photos Graphs/charts Video Session 1945 Slide 19-

46 Media Outreach: How do I match my story to a media outlet? Straight pitch for coverage: –Reporters beat is and the kind of story they like –Pitch letter and call Session 1946 Slide 19-

47 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Pick the right spokesperson –Knows the program/issues –Has experience talking about the program/issues Session 1947 Slide 19-

48 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Master the sound byte –Quote or succinct one-liner –Keep to 8-10 seconds. –Lead with the conclusion –Avoid jargon and acronyms –Be brief and direct Session 1948 Slide 19-

49 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Know your show –Watch several episodes of the talk show or news broadcast to familiarize yourself –Talk to the booker or producer ahead of time –Other guests and the order of appearance Session 1949 Slide 19-

50 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Know your message –Know the main points you want to make. –Anticipate questions but do not over-rehearse –Steer the interview toward your main points –Dont read from your notes on the air Session 1950 Slide 19-

51 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Reiterate your points –Repeat your major point over and over –Dont want to risk having your main point edited out. –Take advantage of pauses –Have a right to complete your answers, –Request clarification –Do not fudge facts and figures. –Bring visuals Session 1951 Slide 19-

52 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Pay attention to body language –Avoid distracting actions –Sit upright –Look at the interviewer, not the camera –Use moderate hand gestures, smile and nod –Remember that everything you do will be magnified Session 1952 Slide 19-

53 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Assume you are always on camera –Act like you are on camera at all times –Do not say anything, even jokingly, that could be taken out of context –Assume the cameras are always rolling Session 1953 Slide 19-

54 Media Outreach: Television Interview Tips Dress carefully –Women - solid-colored, simple suits or dresses. –Women - avoid light colors, busy patterns, sparkling or noisy jewelry and heavy make-up. –Men - light-blue shirts and dark suits. –Men - look professional but dont overdress –Men - Ties should not have wild colors. –Men and women should avoid clothes that are uncomfortable –Contact lenses are preferred over glasses Session 1954 Slide 19-


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