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Maintenance Modeling Tutorial © 2009 Alion Science and Technology Rev. 3 020409.

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1 Maintenance Modeling Tutorial © 2009 Alion Science and Technology Rev. 3 020409

2 IMPRINT Pro The Improved Performance Research Integration Tool (IMPRINT) was developed for the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Human Research and Engineering Directorate (HRED). This tutorial describes the professional version of IMPRINT, namely IMPRINT Pro. IMPRINT Pro is government owned and consists of a set of automated aids to assist analysts in conducting human performance analyses. It provides the means for estimating manpower, personnel and training (MPT) requirements and constraints for new weapon systems very early in the acquisition process.

3 Purpose of the Maintenance Model The objective of the IMPRINT Pro Equipment/Maintenance module is to help you estimate maintenance manhour requirements for your system. This module lets you enter properties that control such items as the maintenance manpower pools, the spare availability, and the combat damage potential. These properties, coupled with a mission schedule and the data describing the maintenance actions that your system may need are combined in a stochastic maintenance simulation. The primary purpose of the simulation is to predict the maintenance manhours required to attain an acceptable system availability.

4 Questions answered by the Maintenance Model How many people of each specialty are required to meet the system availability requirement? Which pieces of equipment are the high drivers for maintenance? How should each organizational level be staffed? How sensitive is my maintenance manpower requirement to the failure rate of individual components?

5 Tutorial Topics This tutorial covers the following topics: Maintenance Model Environment Loading a Maintenance Model Understanding Warfighters Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and ScenariosUnderstanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios Performance Moderators Running a Model Reports Return to Introduction

6 Tutorial Topics This tutorial covers the following topics: Maintenance Model Environment Loading a Maintenance Model Understanding Warfighters Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and ScenariosUnderstanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios Performance Moderators Running a Model Reports Return to Introduction To skip to any topic, simply click the corresponding hyperlink. Return to Topics To return to this topics page at any time during the tutorial, simply click the Return to Topics hyperlink located in the lower right-hand corner of your screen:

7 Getting to know the Maintenance Model Environment The Maintenance Model environment has many elements which are similar to the Operations Model environment: Toolbar Analysis Tree Message Bar Properties Window Output Window Menu Bar Return to Topics

8 Getting to know the Maintenance Model Environment Some elements are used less in the Maintenance environment but still available for use: Event Queue Search and Replace Return to Topics Windows

9 Getting to know the Maintenance Model Environment Other elements not used by the Maintenance Model : Network Diagram Palette *Used by Operations Model only Return to Topics Variable Watches * * *

10 Studying a Maintenance Model The Maintenance model is defined by the following three elements: Warfighters. The pool of available specialties running your system. Subsystems. The parts of your weapons system made up of various components requiring maintenance. Scenarios. The conditions under which the system and its components will be used. Return to Topics In order to study these elements, we begin by loading up a sample analysis.

11 Loading a Maintenance Model To see the Maintenance Model Environment first hand, a folder must first be added to the tree: 1. Right-mouse click the Local Server node. Return to Topics 2. Choose New Folder. A new folder appears. The following can be added to any folder: New Analyses Library Analyses Imported Analyses New Analyses from Maintenance Template New Analysis from MMF Template

12 Loading a Maintenance Model To see the Maintenance Model Environment first hand, load a sample library model as follows: 1. Right-mouse click the desired folder. 2. In the shortcut menu which appears, select Library Analysis. 3. In the list that appears, select the Close Combat Heavy M1 Abrams Tank Model. Return to Topics

13 Loading a Maintenance Model The Tank Model appears in the Analysis Tree: The Properties Window displays additional information about this analysis. The newly added analysis is highlighted to indicate that it is the currently-loaded analysis. Return to Topics

14 Loading an Operations Model With the Tank Model analysis loaded in the tree, we may begin to view its elements as follows: Click the plus + sign next to the analysis name. Note the list of nodes below: The nodes primarily used by the Maintenance Model are the Warfighters and Equipment nodes. We begin with the Warfighters node. Return to Topics

15 Understanding Warfighters The Maintenance aspect of any analysis begins by locating the Warfighters node in the tree: 1. Click the plus + sign next to the Warfighters node to expand it. 2. Note the nodes that appear. 4. Click the plus + sign next to the Maintainers node to expand it. 3. Look for the Maintainers node. Return to Topics

16 Understanding Warfighters Maintainer data may be viewed as follows: 1. Single-click a listed maintainer. Its corresponding properties appear in the Properties window. 2. Double-click the same maintainer to display this same information in the main IMPRINT Pro window. In this example, we see that our 45K specialty is a Tank Turret Repairer. Return to Topics

17 Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios Next, locate the Equipment node in the tree: 2. Click the plus + sign next to the Equipment node to expand it. 1. Look for the Equipment node, directly under the Missions node. Return to Topics

18 Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios Note that the Equipment node contains two elements: Return to Topics 1. Subsystems 2. Scenarios

19 Subsystems Subsystems are the larger parts of your weapon system that are made up of various components. The following are examples of subsystems : Armament Engine Turret Structure Communications Suspension and Tracks Return to Topics

20 Viewing Subsystems Subsystems may be viewed by expanding the node in the tree: * * * * * 1. Locate the Subsystems node in your analysis. 2. Click the plus + sign to expand the Subsystems list. 3. Note the subsystems which appear. Return to Topics

21 Subsystem Components All Subsystems are made up of Components. Below are some examples of Components: Cannon Tube Cannon Breech Return to Topics

22 Viewing Components Components may be viewed by expanding the node in the tree: * * 1.Select a subsystem from the tree. 2. Click the plus + sign next to the node to expand it. The Components node appears below. 3. Click the plus + sign next to the Components node to see the list of Components this particular subsystem contains. 4. Note the components which appear. Return to Topics

23 Component Repair Tasks Subsystem Components require repairs on a regular basis. The following are examples of Repair Tasks a component may require: Adjust and Repair Inspect Remove and Replace Test and Check Troubleshoot All Repair Tasks can be of type Preventive or Corrective. Return to Topics

24 Viewing Repair Tasks Repair tasks may be viewed by expanding the node in the tree: The component Cannon Tube contains one Repair Task of the Adjust and Repair category. 1.Select a component from the tree. 2. Click the plus + sign next to the component to expand the node. Note the Repair Tasks node appears. 3. Click the plus + sign next to the Repair Tasks node to list out the repair tasks this component requires. * Return to Topics

25 Viewing Repair Tasks Click directly on this repair task to see its properties: This task is a Corrective Adjust and Repair task. It may be done at the direct support level when the part is removed from (or off) the system. Only a 45G specialty with a minimum skill level of 20 can do this task. Only one is required. This repair task is needed approximately every 3400 hours when the component fails. It takes about 11.67 hours to complete this repair task. 66% of the time, this maintenance action will cause a specific systems participation in the segment to end prematurely. Neither the Contact Team nor the Crew Chief may perform the maintenance. It must be taken to a Direct Support facility (see A above) for repairs. Return to Topics

26 Scenarios Scenarios are the conditions under which the system and its components will be used. A scenario may contain several segments (timed deployments of specific numbers of systems), each drawing from the same pool of resources for repairs. Return to Topics

27 Viewing Scenarios View the list of Scenarios in your analysis as follows: 1. Locate the Scenarios node in your analysis tree. It is the second node under Equipment. 2. Click the plus + sign next to the Scenarios node to expand the list. 3. The scenario Ten Days of Missions appears. Return to Topics

28 Viewing Scenarios To select a scenario, single-click it in the analysis tree. 2. Note that the Properties Grid displays information related to your Scenario. Return to Topics 1. Select the scenario Ten Days of Missions in the tree.

29 Viewing Scenarios Double-click the same scenario to display its properties in the main window as well: Return to Topics The middle IMPRINT Pro window displays the same information but categorized among different tabbed windows: Note: all nodes in the tree may be double-clicked to view their information this way.

30 Elements of a Scenario Scenarios comprise the following 7 elements: Segments Fuel Supply Ammo Supply Travel Time Spares Maintenance Crew Contact Team *Note: Segments is the only element that is also a node in the analysis tree. * Return to Topics

31 Segments Segments are scheduled deployments which establish usage of specific numbers of systems. This usage possibly leads to component failure. Segment 1: Deploy 4 systems at time 0500z. Segment 2: Deploy 2 systems at time 0700z. Segment 3: Deploy 1 systems at time 0730z. Return to Topics

32 Viewing Segments View the segments in your analysis as follows: 4. Note the segments which appear: 1. Locate the Scenario in the tree whose segments you wish to view. 2. Click the plus + sign next to it - the Segments node appears. 3. Click the plus + sign next to the Segments node to see the list of segments this particular scenario contains. This scenario has one segment entitled Mission 1. Return to Topics

33 Viewing Segments Next, to select a segment, single-click it in the tree. Return to Topics

34 Viewing Segments Once you have selected a segment from the tree, the properties window populates with data pertaining to that segment: Double-click the segment to see the segment properties information in the main screen, as well. Return to Topics

35 Viewing Segments There are three main elements to each segment: 1. Segment Info 2. Combat 3. Consumables Return to Topics

36 Segment Info Segments are defined by the following parameters: This segment begins at 0.0 hours on day 1. If the minimum number of systems (see bottom of page) are not available by 0.5 hours, the segment is cancelled. For four hours, this segment will be requesting systems from the pool. If another segment is occurring at the same time and is competing for systems, the segment with the higher priority gets available systems first. At least 1 system must go out every 0.17 hours if one is available to send. This segment will continue, as will system requests, even if no sytems are available. Only 4 systems will ever be assigned to this segment from the available pool of systems. Return to Topics

37 Combat Combat may affect your system availability. It will ultimately also affect your manpower estimates due to the need for maintainers to make system repairs. For every hour the system is in use, there is a 50% chance the system will sustain a hit in combat. There is a 25% chance that the hit will render the system a total loss. It will take 7.00 hours to replace it with an entirely new system if the system is a total loss. It will take 15 hours to repair the system to a functional level if repairs are possible. Return to Topics

38 Consumables Based on the numbers entered in the window below, IMPRINT calculates the operational units consumed (rounds fired, gallons used, miles traveled) at all times during the model run. Consumables are important because they are the parameters on which component failures are triggered. For example, if a cannon tube (of subsystem armament) is estimated to fail every 180 rounds fired, then we can expect this failure to occur approximately when our system reaches its 12 th segment (180 rounds/ (15 rounds/segment) = 12 segments). This system will travel 20 units (e.g., miles) per hour and will consume 40 gallons of fuel per mile. This system needs 3.0 hours of prep/load time before the segment begins. It is estimated that each subsystem will consume approximately 15 rounds in each segment. Return to Topics

39 Fuel Supply Return to Topics

40 Fuel Supply The Fuel Supply option helps to factor in Suppliers and Supporters in your manpower requirement estimates. It is located on the second tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

41 Fuel Supply Fuel Supply adds the following information to your model: You can specify, by transporter, the amount of fuel each can carry. Three supply/support personnel of MOS specialty 63A are required to run this transporter. This transporter can make a maximum of 4 trips in one day. More trips per transporter means less transporters required overall. Therefore less transporter operators are required. Return to Topics

42 Ammo Supply Return to Topics

43 Ammo Supply The Ammo Supply option, similar to the Fuel Supply option, helps to factor in Suppliers and Supporters in your manpower requirement estimates since ammunition, like fuel, must also be transported to the systems requiring it. It is located on the third tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

44 Ammo Supply Ammo Supply adds the following information to your analysis: Transporter name/Weapon System Capacity (# of rounds) Specialty type(s) required Max number of daily trips Amount of those specialty type(s) required *More trips means less transporters and transporter operators required overall. * Return to Topics

45 Travel Time Return to Topics

46 Travel Time The time it takes a system to travel from the point of breakdown to a repair facility is known as the Travel Time. This time required is added to the total time to repair to accurately reflect system availability. It is located on the fourth tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

47 GS Facility DS Facility Travel Time In IMPRINT Pro, maintenance facilities are divided into four categories: 1. ORG (Ogranizational Support): Maintenance can be done at the Unit level. 2. DS (Direct Support): Repair Team is located typically at a facility nearby. 3. GS (General Support): Maintenance facility is located remotely from system, and only parts of a system can be sent to the facility for repairs. Specific parts can also be shipped to this facility. Entire systems can be taken to this facility. These repairs are always done ON the system. 4. Contact Team: a mobile repair team goes out to the system to do repairs. Return to Topics

48 Travel Time Travel Time can be specified as follows: Travel time from system breakdown to each of the different maintenance facilities Travel time from one maintenance facility type to another. The time it would take a contact team to reach the location of the system. Return to Topics

49 Spares Return to Topics

50 Spares Spares affect system availability. If a system has spare parts readily accessible, it may be returned to service sooner than a system which must wait for a spare part. It is located on the fifth tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

51 Spares Spares add the following information to your analysis: Numbers displayed in the % Available column indicate the percentage of time spare parts required by the subsystem are available for use. Numbers displayed in the Wait in Hours column indicate the number of hours the system must wait for spare parts to arrive. In the example above, all spare parts for all subsystems are available. This enables the crew manning the system to do repairs if the required repair tasks permit. Return to Topics

52 Maintenance Crew Return to Topics

53 Maintenance Crew The Maintenance Crew tab helps establish crew constraints. When crew is limited, fewer systems are likely to be sent out and fewer systems are likely to be immediately repaired. As a result, Operational Readiness will be affected. Return to Topics

54 Maintenance Crew The Maintenance Crew tab adds the following information to your analysis: The number of shifts in each 24-hour period. In this case two shifts will be manned. The length of a shift (in hours). Each shift is 12 hours in this case. The maintenance shift level whose data you are entering. Note: when you are finished entering data for one level, select the next level to enter its corresponding data. A quantity column appears for each shift you add in the event you wish to vary the number of maintainers by shift. In this example, we have 999 maintainers of Specialty type 63E of Grade 20 for each shift. At least 3 would be required (at minimum) if all repair tasks which require this exact crewmember designation were to occur simultaneously. Return to Topics

55 Maintenance Crew When you choose to run your model, you may run it with the crew constraints you specified or in an unconstrained mode. This option is available in the Settings page under the Execution menu. 1. Locate the Execution menu at the top of your screen. 2. Select the Settings Option. 3. A new tab displaying Execution Settings information appears. 4. By checking the Crew Limits On option, the model will run with crew constraints enabled. For more information on running your model, skip to the section entitled Running a Maintenance Model in this tutorial. Return to Topics

56 Contact Team Return to Topics

57 Contact Team The Contact Team is a mobile repair team that travels out to the system to do repairs. The Contact Team tab is the last tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

58 Contact Team The following information is available in the Contact Team tab: The number of contact teams that will be shared by all systems in this scenario. In this example, there are two contact teams. There are 4 multifunctional maintainers in each contact team. Only three repair actions at any one time can be in the queue waiting for contact team attention before maintenance actions start being routed to other maintenance levels (DS and GS). Return to Topics

59 Performance Moderators Return to Topics

60 Performance Moderators (PTS) Performance Moderators, also known as PTS, allow you to factor personnel, environmental and training conditions in your model. These conditions may affect your repair task times, depending on the repair task types. Return to Topics

61 Performance Moderators (PTS) Performance Moderators are divided into three categories: 1.Personnel (P) What specialties and grades are available? 2. Training (T) How often have available specialties been trained? 3. Stressors (S) What are the environmental conditions taking place in my model? Return to Topics

62 Performance Moderators (PTS) Once you have finished entering all your repair tasks, you may apply Performance Moderators using the following three steps: 1. Set the performance moderator values. 2. Review the effects of your moderators. 3. Check the PTS option in the execution settings page. Return to Topics

63 Personnel Return to Topics

64 Personnel (P) Modify the personnel in your model using the following steps: 1. Select the Moderators menu. 2. Select the Settings submenu. 3. Select the Personnel submenu. 4. The Personnel Characteristics dialog box displays. Return to Topics

65 Personnel (P) Next, click the Maintenance tab. You may change the ASVAB Composite, Cutoff and Test Score Category for each Warfighter by typing in new values manually: 45K begins with an ASVAB cutoff of 93. Click the cell to select it. Type in the new desired value. The new value displays in the cell. In the example above, we have increased the requirements of our 45K maintainer. A more skilled maintainer might be harder to locate but might finish the repair task more quickly if available. Return to Topics

66 Training Return to Topics

67 Training (T) Modify the training frequency in your model using the following steps: 1. Select the Moderators menu. 2. Select the Settings submenu. 3. Select the Training submenu. 4. The Training dialog box displays. Return to Topics

68 Training (T) Next, click the Maintenance tab and select the training frequency for each Warfighter by using drop-down menus: 45K begins with a training frequency of once per month. Click the cell to see the dropdown arrow. Click the arrow to display additional values to choose from. The new value displays in the cell. Select a new value from the list. In the example above, we have increased the training frequency of our 45K maintainer. A more trained maintainer might be harder to locate but might finish the repair task more quickly if available. Return to Topics

69 Stressors (S) Return to Topics

70 Stressors (S) The following types of stressors may be applied to your tasks: Cold (°F, °C) Wind (knots) Heat (°F, °C) Humidity (%) Noise (distance in ft) Noise (decibels) MOPP Level Sleepless Hours User-defined stressors (Example: Vibration) Return to Topics

71 Stressors (S) Modify the stressors in your model using the following steps: 1. Select the Moderators menu. 2. Select the Settings submenu. 3. Select the Stressors submenu. 4. The Stressors dialog box displays. Return to Topics

72 Stressors (S) Next, click the Maintenance tab and select the stressors for each Warfighter by using drop-down menus: The task of adjust and repair of the cannon tube begins in a temperature- neutral environment. Click the cell to see the dropdown arrow. Click the arrow to display additional values to choose from. The new value displays in the cell. Select a new value from the list. In the example above, we have decreased the temperature for our 45K maintainer. A colder environment might cause the repair task to take longer. Return to Topics

73 Reviewing Moderator Effects With moderators now in place, review the before and after effects on repair task times as follows: 1. Select the Moderators menu. 2. Select the Results submenu. 3. The PTS Results window appears. Return to Topics

74 Reviewing Moderator Effects Review the before and after effects from your moderators as follows: 1. Scroll down and locate the cannon tube repair task. 2. Scroll to the right until you see the Time columns. 3. In the upper right- hand corner of the window, check the stressors option (to apply the cold temperatures), and then click Apply. 4. Note that the Adjusted time is approximately two minutes longer than the previous time. Return to Topics

75 Checking the PTS Option The last step in applying PTS to your model occurs when you are ready to run your model. Locate the option as follows: 1. Select the Execution menu. 2. Select the Settings Option. 3. The Execution Settings window appears. 4. Look for the PTS Adjustments checkbox on the right-hand side of this window. 5. Check the PTS Adjustments option to apply PTS moderators to your model at run-time. Return to Topics

76 Running a Model Running a model (maintenance scenario) generates report data which may then be studied to find out how manpower estimate questions are answered by the scenario you created. You may run your IMPRINT maintenance model at any point during the development of your model. Return to Topics

77 Running a Model Running a model entails the following steps: 1. Checking the Execution Settings page 3. Checking for Errors 4. Begin Simulation 2. Setting the Simulation Speed Return to Topics

78 Execution Settings The Execution Settings page provides options for running your model. Access the Execution Settings page follows: 1. Locate the Execution Menu. 2. Select the Settings option. 3. The Execution Settings page appears. Return to Topics

79 Execution Settings The Execution Settings window provides the following options for running your model: Choose the scenario in your analysis you wish to run. Enter the number of days you wish the scenario to run (simulation time). Specify a random number seed to increase variability in your system repair times. Set the number of systems you actually have available in your scenario for this run. Check the PTS Adjustments option if you wish to use repair task times that account for personnel, training and stressors. Check the Crew Limits On option to constrain crew to numbers specified in the shift manning levels. Check the Animation On option to see animated system information as the model runs. Return to Topics Select the Maintenance Model option.

80 Simulation Speed The speed of your simulation may be changed in two locations: 1. Locate the Execution menu, and then select the Simulation Speed option. In the list provided, select a new speed. 2. Locate the Simulation Speed icon on the toolbar, and select a new speed. Return to Topics

81 Checking for Errors The Check for Errors option sweeps through your model to look for errors in any fields that may be altered. Use this option as follows: Click the Check for Errors option (the check mark on the toolbar.) The check reports in the Output window any information about errors encountered in the model. In this example our model contained no errors. Return to Topics

82 Begin Simulation When you run your maintenance model, your subsystem and scenario data combines with a stochastic maintenance model included in IMPRINT Pro to provide data about the operational readiness of your scenario. Return to Topics

83 Begin Simulation You may start the run of your model in two locations: 1. Locate the Execution menu, and then select the Begin Simulation option. 2. Locate and select the Begin Simulation button on the toolbar. Return to Topics

84 Begin Simulation The Output window indicates when the model is finished running. Running the Tank Model scenario for 10 days takes approximately 1.66 seconds to run on our machine and 240 hours to run in simulation clock time. Return to Topics

85 Reports Return to Topics

86 Reports IMPRINT Pro provides 16 different reports for viewing your maintenance scenario data. Report presentations include: Textual Summary and Detail Data Charted Data Return to Topics

87 Reports Access the Report selection dialog for your model run as follows: 1. Locate and select the Reports menu. 2. Select the Maintenance Results option. 3. The Maintenance Results Report Selection Dialog appears. Return to Topics

88 Reports Select the reports you wish to view by checking the corresponding boxes. Click the Check All/ Clear All options to select/deselect all reports at once. Next, click the Ok button to view selected reports. Return to Topics

89 Reports Reports display in Microsoft Excel as worksheets in a reports workbook: Click the tab of the report you wish to view. The name of the report lists at the top. Header information describing your scenario follows the report name. Data about your model run appears in the middle. Return to Topics

90 Reports Maintenance Summary Over the course of a 10.0 day run, systems were operating for a total of 4.0 hours. Return to Topics

91 Reports Daily Maintenance On day 1, the Org level maintainers did a total of 1.4 hours Preventive maintenance and 30.2 hours Corrective maintenance. Repair tasks never took place at any of the other maintenance facilities (DS, GS, Contact Team or Crew.) Return to Topics

92 Reports Reliability and Availability Corrective maintenance tied up systems for 2.71% of the time.. Out of 1 segment requested, one was accomplished. As a result our operational readiness is 100%. Although we elected to assign 4 systems to this segment if 4 were available, only 1 system was set to go out on each departure group. With only 1 system, our segment was still accomplished. The addition of Preventive maintenance tied up systems for 3.29% of the time Return to Topics

93 Reports Maintenance Hit Matrix Components on the Armament subsystem required 1.25 hours Corrective Maintenance of the Remove and Replace category. Return to Topics

94 Reports Contact Team Hit Matrix and Crew Chief Hit Matrix Because no maintenance was done by the Contact Team or the Crew, the matrix report for each contains no records. Return to Topics

95 Reports Daily Reliability A single segment was requested and accomplished in the first day of the mission. During the segment, four systems were requested but only one was available. Return to Topics

96 Reports Maintainability This report shows us the average number of maintenance manhours each of the different subsystems required relative to total operating hours and total scenario hours. Return to Topics

97 Reports Maintainability This same information is also displayed in the Maintainability graph to follow. Return to Topics

98 Reports Headcount Frequencies A crew size of 0 for the 45E20 specialty results in a frequency of 97.29. This means that for 97.29% of the time in this scenario run, zero (0) maintainers of this specialty were required. For 2.19% of the time remaining, however, two (2) maintainers of this specialty were required. This time is equal to 2.19% x 10 days x 24 hours = 5.256 hours. The 45E20 specialty at the Org level is required but not heavily utilized. Return to Topics

99 Reports Manhour Requirments The total number of maintenance manhours performed by the 45E20 specialty at the Org level is 15.6 hours. The 63E20 specialty at the same level (Org) was utilized for slightly more time (16.0 hours). Return to Topics

100 Reports Manhour Requirments The Manhour Requirements graph displays the same information in a histogram format. Return to Topics

101 Reports Combat Damage Out of the entire 10- day run (240 hours), only one segment lasting four (4) hours was performed. Because the Combat parameters were not set for this scenario, this system never encountered combat hits nor any attrition or damage repair time as a result. Return to Topics

102 Reports Logistical Summary The wait time for spare parts among all the levels is 0.0 hours. This can be attributed to the fact that availability of spare parts was set to 100% at the beginning of this scenario in the spares tab. Return to Topics

103 Additional Resources User Manuals: IMPRINT Pro Volume 1: Basic Procedures IMPRINT Pro Volume 2: Developing Analyses IMPRINT Pro Volume 3: Syntax Reference Quick Start Guides/Flowcharts: IMPRINT Pro QSG - Operations Model.pdf IMPRINT Pro QSG - Maintenance Model.pdf For more information on IMPRINT Pro: imprint-info@arl.army.mil Return to Topics For more information on creating IMPRINT Pro analyses, see the following resources located in the IMPRINT Pro/Documentation folder:


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