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Introduction to Global CPC Standards & Product Selection Best Practice Presentation to: Genesee Valley Chapter of the American Society of Safety Engineers.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Global CPC Standards & Product Selection Best Practice Presentation to: Genesee Valley Chapter of the American Society of Safety Engineers."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Global CPC Standards & Product Selection Best Practice Presentation to: Genesee Valley Chapter of the American Society of Safety Engineers

2 Global Market Place = Global Standards (?) The Global Types of Chemical Protective Clothing Certification of PPE European Chemical Protective Clothing Standards and Test Methods Selection and use of PPE, including chemical protective clothing Agenda

3 Manufacturer of limited life chemical protective clothing Established: 1975 Markets: Global distribution network covering over 50 countries UK, Europe, Middle East, Asia, Africa, Australasia and the Americas Headquarters: Kingston upon Hull, UK Production: Microgard Xiamen Ltd (Xiamen, China) Employees: Hull (35*), Xiamen (700), Leverkusen (7) *Figure includes a global sales team of 11

4 Microgard Ltd – Hull, UK MICROGARD Limited – Global Headquarters Kingston Upon Hull, United Kingdom

5 Microgard Ltd – Hull, UK MICROGARD Limited – European DC Kingston Upon Hull, United Kingdom

6 MICROGARD Xiamen Limited Xiamen, PRC

7 Global Market Place = Global Standards (?)

8 The Global Types of Chemical Protection Limited protection against liquid spray TYPE 6 EN ISO Protection against solid particulates TYPE 5 EN ISO Protection against saturating spray of liquids TYPE 4 EN ISO Protection against strong & directional jets of liquid TYPE 3 EN ISO non-gas-tight protection against liquids, gases & solid particulates TYPE 2 EN ISO Gas-Tight protection against liquids, gases & solid particulates TYPE 1 EN 943-1/2 ISO © Microgard Ltd 2011

9 European Norms (EN) International Standards (ISO) American National Standards (ANSI) Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) EN 943-1: 2002 Type 1 ISO 16602: 2007 Type 1 ANSI 103: 2010 Category 1 JIS T 8115: 2010 Type 1 EN 943-1: 2002 Type 2 ISO 16602: 2007 Type 2 ANSI 103: 2010 Category 2 JIS T 8115: 2010 Type 2 EN 14605: 2005+A1: 2009 Type 3 ISO 16602: 2007 Type 3 ANSI 103: 2010 Category 3 JIS T 8115: 2010 Type 3 EN 14605: 2005+A1: 2009 Type 4 ISO 16602: 2007 Type 4 ANSI 103: 2010 Category 4 JIS T 8115: 2010 Type 4 EN ISO : A1: 2010 Type 5 ISO : 2004 Type 5 ANSI 103: 2010 Category 5 JIS T 8115: 2010 Type 5 EN 13034: 2005+A1: 2009 Type 6 ISO 16602: 2007 Type 6 ANSI 103: 2010 Category 6 JIS T 8115: 2010 Type 6 Major CPC Standards

10 Certification of PPE – CE Marking Production quality monitoring system Category I (Simple Design) Category IICategory III (Complex Design) Technical Documentation EC Declaration of Conformity EC Type-Examination EC quality control system for the final product XXXX

11 Certification of PPE - Categories of PPE CategoriesDescriptionDefinitionRequirements Category ISimple Design Minimal risk e.g. cleaning materials of weak action and easily reversible effects Self certification Self assessment of production Category IINeither simple or complex Intermediate risk e.g. protection against mechanical impact EC-Type Examination by a notified body EC Declaration of Conformity Self assessment of production Category IIIComplex Design Mortal risk e.g. worn or used in situations where there is a risk of mortal danger or irreversible harm EC-Type Examination by a notified body Notified body assessment of production (Article 11A or 11B) EC Declaration of Conformity Clothing for protection against hazardous substances are designated as Category III PPE

12 Innocuousness. To ensure that no harmful, forbidden or restricted substance is used in product construction, as well as checking for sharp edges or injurious surfaces. Ergonomics. Design, comfort, fit. Can the wearer carry out the required activity comfortably? Protective coverage. Adequate coverage to provide sufficient protection Protective qualities. Impact, abrasion, cut, chemical and thermal resistance Marking and instructions –Manufacturers name and address –Storage/ cleaning/ maintenance –Protective performance level –Suitable accessories/spare parts –Relevant warnings –Type approval Notified Body details The European standard which covers the general requirements for protective clothing is EN 340: 2003 European PPE Testing What is covered?

13 PPE Directive 89/686/EEC Category III – Complex Design EN 14325: 2004 Test Methods and performance classification of chemical protective clothing materials, seams, joins and assemblages EN530 Abrasion Resistance EN340: 2003 Protective Clothing General Requirements Article 11A or B Manufacturer Assessment & Certification Article 10 Product EC-Type Examination Certificate EN ISO 7854 Flex Cracking Resistance EN ISO Trapezoidal Tear Resistance EN ISO Tensile Strength EN 863 Puncture Resistance EN / ISO 6529 Chemical permeation resistance (Materials & Seams) ISO Seam Strength EN ISO Jet Spray Test Manufacturers EC Declaration of Conformity XXXX EN 943-1, Annex A Inward Leakage Test EN 464 Leak Tightness EN 943-1, Annex A Inward Leakage Test (Type 1b* & 1c) EN530 Abrasion Resistance EN ISO 7854 Flex Cracking Resistance EN ISO Trapezoidal Tear Resistance EN ISO Tensile Strength EN 863 Puncture Resistance EN / ISO 6529 Chemical permeation resistance (Materials & Seams) ISO Seam Strength EN530 Abrasion Resistance EN ISO 7854 Flex Cracking Resistance EN ISO Trapezoidal Tear Resistance EN ISO Tensile Strength EN 863 Puncture Resistance EN / ISO 6529 Chemical permeation resistance (Materials & Seams) ISO Seam Strength EN 943-1: 2002 Test methods and performance classification** The European Model

14 PPE Directive 89/686/EEC Category III – Complex Design EN14325: 2004 Test Methods and performance classification of chemical protective clothing materials, seams, joins and assemblages EN340: 2003 Protective Clothing General Requirements Article 11A or B Manufacturer Assessment & Certification Article 10 Product EC-Type Examination Certificate EN530 Abrasion Resistance EN ISO Trapezoidal Tear Resistance EN ISO Tensile Strength EN 863 Puncture Resistance ISO 6530 Chemical penetration/repellence ISO Seam Strength EN530 Abrasion Resistance EN ISO 7854 Flex Cracking Resistance EN ISO Trapezoidal Tear Resistance EN 863 Puncture Resistance ISO Seam Strength EN ISO , Method B Spray Test EN ISO Inward Leakage Test EN ISO , Method A Reduced Spray Test EN530 Abrasion Resistance EN ISO 7854 Flex Cracking Resistance EN ISO Trapezoidal Tear Resistance EN ISO Tensile Strength EN 863 Puncture Resistance ISO Seam Strength © Microgard Ltd 2008 Manufacturers EC Declaration of Conformity XXXX EN / ISO 6529 Chemical permeation resistance (Materials & Seams) The European Model

15 EN & ISO CPC Standards and Test Methods

16 Chemical Protective Clothing - Whole suit test requirements, ergonomics Movements to be performed prior to whole suit inward leakage testing Suit hinders one or more movements = automatic failure!! Any substantial rips, tears or other visible damage = automatic failure!!

17 ISO Measures the force required to pull the seam apart Unit: Newton Each straight seam type on a garment tested Classification based on the weakest seam type. Six performance classes Class Seam Strength (N) Min. Performance 6>500 5>300Type 1, 2 4>125 3>75 2>50 1>30Type 3, 4, 5, 6 Chemical Protective Clothing - Whole suit test requirements, seam strength

18 EN 943 / ISO – TYPE 1 Gas tight protective clothing – suits are intrinsically sealed against the environment

19 EN 464 / ISO/FDIS* – Pressure Test for Gas-Tight Suits *FDIS indicates that this test method is under development

20 EN 943 – TYPE 2 Non-gas tight (positive pressure) protective clothing – suits which retain a positive internal pressure to prevent ingress of dusts, liquids or vapours

21 EN – TYPE 3 Liquid tight protective clothing - Suits which can protect against strong and directional jets of a liquid chemical.

22 Whole Suit Requirements Type 3 Inward Leakage Test ISO / EN Test Method: ISO Test liquid containing; Water at (20 +/- 2)°C Water-soluble dye e.g. methyl blue Surfactant e.g. genapol Surface tension: (30 ± 5) × 103 N/m Pressure at the nozzle: 1.5 bar (150 kPa) Distance from nozzle to target: 1 meter Target Areas: potential weak points (i.e. seams, zips) Pass Criteria: <3 time calibration stain

23 EN14605 / ISO – TYPE 4 Spray tight protective clothing - Suits which can protect against saturation of liquid chemicals where volume of the liquid builds up on the suit, causing pools and rivulets

24 Whole Suit Requirements Type 4 Inward Leakage Test ISO / EN Test Method: ISO , Method B Test liquid containing; Water at (20 +/- 2)°C Water-soluble dye e.g. methyl blue Surfactant e.g. genapol Surface tension: (30 ± 5) × 103 N/m Pressure at the nozzle: 3.0 bar (300 kPa) Distance from nozzle to target: 1.5 meter Target Areas: whole suit (the full body) Pass Criteria: <3 time calibration stain

25 Chemical Permeation Process where on a molecular level molecules of a hazard are passing through a fabric 1.Absorption of molecules of liquids onto contact surface 2.Diffusion of the absorbed molecules through a material 3.De-sorption from the opposite surface

26 Chemical Permeation Testing

27 TermDefinition Permeation rate The measurement of the amount of chemical (usually by mass per unit area) passing through the test specimen in a given time. Open loop A test system where the detection medium is not of fixed volume and is continually replaced with fresh material for the duration of the test. Closed loop A test system where the volume of detection medium is fixed and is re-circulated throughout the test. Breakthrough detection time The time elapsed from start when the chemical is first detected. Depends on the sensitivity of the system to the chemical under investigation. Defined as the sample time immediately preceding detected breakthrough. Minimum detectable permeation rate The lowest permeation rate determinable by the system in use. Normalized breakthrough detection time Time elapsed when the measured permeation rate reaches a predetermined level (i.e. the normalized permeation rate) Normalized permeation rate The permeation rate used for determining the normalized breakthrough detection time, i.e. 0.1 and/or 1.0 µg/cm 2 /min. Steady state permeation rateThe point in the test when the permeation rate is no longer increasing or decreasing. Cumulative permeationThe total amount of test chemical that has permeated over a specified time after initial contact.

28 Chemical Permeation Testing

29 Chemical Penetration Testing Penetration is a process whereby a liquid, gaseous or solid substance penetrates a fabric by passing through the pores or holes

30 ISO Penetration under Pressure Determination of the resistance of protective clothing materials to penetration by liquids under pressure Chemical Penetration Testing

31 EN ISO 6530 Gutter Test Test method for the measurement of indices of penetration, absorption and repellency for protective clothing materials against liquid chemicals, mainly chemicals of low volatility Chemical Penetration Testing

32 EN Atomiser test Determination of resistance to penetration by sprayed liquid chemicals, emulsions and dispersions (I.e. pesticides) Chemical Penetration Testing

33 EN13034 / ISO – Type 6 Reduced spray protection - Suits for protection against light spray and splashes of liquid chemicals

34 Whole Suit Requirements Type 6 Inward Leakage Test EN / ISO Test Method: ISO , Method B Test liquid containing; Water at (20 +/- 2)°C Water-soluble dye e.g. methyl blue Surfactant e.g. genapol Surface tension: (52 ± 7.5) × 103 N/m Pressure at the nozzle: 3.0 bar (300 kPa) Distance from nozzle to target: 1.5 meter Target Areas: whole suit (the full body) Pass Criteria: <3 time calibration stain

35 EN ISO – Type 5 Protection against solid particulates - Suits for protection against hazardous dusts and dry particles

36 Whole Suit Requirements Type 5 Inward Leakage Test EN ISO Test Method: EN ISO Test substance: Sodium Chloride Aerosol Particle size range: 0.06 to 2µm (0.6 average) Key test parameters; 10 wearers (10 coveralls) Standing still, walking and squatting 3 probes inside suit (chest, waist, knee) continually measuring the ratio of particle concentration inside and outside the suit Test Duration: 9 min standing, 9 min walking and 9 min squatting Pass Criteria: 82 of 90 measurements 30%, 8 of 10 coveralls total inward leakage (average) 15%

37 Other European Norms relevant to CPC EN Ventilated suits for protection from hazardous particulates, including radioactive particulate contamination EN Non-ventilated suits for protection against radioactive particulate contamination EN Protective clothing against infective agents EN ISO Protective clothing with limited flame spread properties EN /EN Protective clothing with electrostatic properties

38 So what product do I choose…..???

39 The Use of Personal Protective Equipment Questions to ask before considering PPE 1.Can I get rid of the hazard altogether? 2.If not, how can I control the risks so that harm is unlikely? Controlling risks – options; a)Try a less risky option, e.g. use alternative chemicals b)Prevent access to the hazard, e.g. by guarding c)Organise work to reduce exposure to the hazards, e.g. automatic rather than manual transfer of hazardous substances d)If after all of the above there is still residual risk, then PPE will need to be provided RISK = (Probability of an accident occurring) x (expected loss in case of an accident)

40 The Use of Personal Protective Equipment Assessing suitable PPE Questions to ask when assessing PPE suitability Is it appropriate for the risks involved and the conditions at the place where exposure to the risk may occur? Does it prevent or adequately control the risks involved without increasing the overall level of risk? Can it be adjusted to fit the wearer correctly? Has the state of health of those who will be wearing it been taken into account? What are the needs of the job and the demands it places on the wearer? If more than one item of PPE is being worn, are they compatible?

41 The Use of Personal Protective Equipment Directive 89/656/EEC These are the obligations of the employer! ARTICLE 4 Ensure the PPE conforms with EU Regulations Inform the user of the risk involved and train them about the right use of the PPE Supply PPE free of charge that is : - fit for purpose and of appropriate size and comfort Define the conditions of use, especially the period the PPE is worn ARTICLE 3 Identify & evaluate the risks Use where the risks cannot be avoided or limited technically Only use PPE products as a final protection alternative ARTICLE 5 Assess whether the item(s) of PPE conform with EU Regulations Analyse and assess the risks involved Define characteristics the PPE must have and compare with the PPE selected Reanalyse the risk in case of a process change

42 Choosing control measures, in order of priority: 1.Eliminate the use of a harmful product or substance and use a safer one. 2.Use a safer form of the product, e.g. paste rather than powder. 3.Change the process to emit less of the substance 4.Enclose the process so that the product does not escape 5.Extract emissions of the substance near the source 6.Have as few workers in harms way as possible 7.Provide personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, coveralls and a respirator. PPE must fit the wearer If your control measures include 5, 6 and 7, make sure they all work together Other regulations – working with hazardous substances Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

43 Selection of Chemical Protective Clothing

44 Selection of Chemical Protective Clothing - Seven Key Factors 1.Can the job be done without chemical protective clothing? 2.The type of exposure most likely to occur? Immersion (continuous or intermittent) Spray (pressurised or not) Splash (continuous, intermittent, or not expected) Mist (continuous or intermittent) Vapours (Gaseous contact) 3.What are the adverse effects of contact with the chemical? 4.The physical demands on the suit? 5.The chemical resistance properties required? 6.The human factors? (i.e. ergonomics, wear ability, heat stress etc) 7.The cost in use?

45 The six types offer an indication of the protective performance of the product …… © Microgard Ltd 2011 Limited protection against liquid spray TYPE 6 EN ISO Protection against solid particulates TYPE 5 EN ISO Protection against saturating spray of liquids TYPE 4 EN ISO Protection against strong & directional jets of liquid TYPE 3 EN ISO non-gas-tight protection against liquids, gases & solid particulates TYPE 2 EN ISO Gas-Tight protection against liquids, gases & solid particulates TYPE 1 EN 943-1/2 ISO 16602

46 MICROGARD® CPC Selection Process Flow 46 Liquid, Gas or Particulate Consider Type 1 or 2 and Permeation data Skin Protection Required? Risk of vapour exposure at hazardous concentrations? Consider Type 5 Note: for higher concentrations of fine particulates a positive pressure suit (i.e. Type 2, PAPR or Air-fed should be considered) Particulate Gas Liquid Liquid under pressure? More than light spray expected? Light spray, splash or aerosol Exposure to liquid expected? Liquid classified as harmful, carcinogenic or otherwise toxic? Perform a Risk Assessment 1.Identify the chemical hazard 2.Determine potential for exposure 3.Determine exposure consequence(s) Chemical Protective Clothing may not be required Consider Type 3 and Permeation data Consider Type 4 and Permeation data Consider Type 4 and Penetration data Consider Type 4 or 6 and Permeation data Consider Type 6 and Penetration data Chemical Protective Clothing may not be required Consider Type 1 or 2 and Permeation data Yes No Liquid classified as harmful, carcinogenic or otherwise toxic?

47 Selection of Chemical Protective Clothing - Considerations 1.Breakthrough time alone is not sufficient to determine how long a garment may be worn once the garment has been contaminated. Safe user wear time may be longer or shorter than the breakthrough time depending on; – the permeation behaviour of the substance – the toxicity of the substance – the exposure conditions (i.e. temperature, pressure etc.) 2.Permeation characteristics of a mixture can often deviate considerably from the behaviour of the individual pure chemicals 3.Very little is known about the relationship between the breakthrough of CPC and human toxicity, when permeation rates are extremely low 4.What about cumulative permeation? But without more toxicity data on chemicals this is potentially another means of comparing different materials resistance to permeation, rather than safe wear time 5.Laboratory testing is not necessarily reflective of real-life

48 Assessment - Example Exposure Scenarios *For these examples there is the risk that continuous or prolonged exposure to this chemical could result in permeation through the garment fabric or seams (dependant on the breakthrough time offered by the CPC), which is relevant given the toxicity of these chemicals, but the immediate (i.e. acute) risk is from the pressurised liquid spray penetrating the garment fabric or seams.

49 Thank you Vielen Dank Merci beaucoup


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