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Title: Rocks in His Head Author: Carol Otis Hurst Illustrator: James Stevenson Genre: Biography.

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Presentation on theme: "Title: Rocks in His Head Author: Carol Otis Hurst Illustrator: James Stevenson Genre: Biography."— Presentation transcript:

1 Title: Rocks in His Head Author: Carol Otis Hurst Illustrator: James Stevenson Genre: Biography

2 Small Group Timer

3 prepaid midnight overflow outdoors outline overgrown prefix Midwest pretest midpoint outgoing overtime overdue outside outfield precaution prediction midsection overweight prehistoric

4 Vocabulary Words attic board chores customer labeled spare stamps janitor minerals quarries forged mentor ornamental More Words to Know

5 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

6 Question of the Day When is valuable to have unique interests?

7 Build Concepts Generalize Prior Knowledge Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Model Characterization Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out- Unique Interests

8 Fluency: Model Characterization

9 Listen as I read Catching the Fire. As I read, notice how I use different tones of voice when I read any dialogue. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

10 What generalization can you make about Simmonss gates? What details in the selection tell us what kind of person Simmons is?

11 Actions What Kind of Product Source of Interests Unique Interests

12 Generalize Page

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14 Word Meaning Chart WordMeaningSentence attic board chores customer labeled spare stamps

15 attic – the space in a house just below the roof and above the other roomsattic board - a group of people managing somethingboard chores – small tasks or easy jobs that you have to do regularlychores

16 customer – someone who buys goods or servicescustomer labeled – put or wrote a label on somethinglabeled spare – extra stamps – small pieces of paper with glue on the back for mailing letters and packagesstamps

17 janitor – someone whose work is taking care of a building or officesjanitor minerals – solid substances, usually dug from the earthminerals quarries – places where stone is dug, cut, or blasted out for use in putting up buildingsquarries

18 forged – heated metal until it is very soft and then hammered it into shapeforged mentor – someone who advises and shows you how to do or be something ornamental – used as decoration Next Slide

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29 Grammar: Possessive Pronouns

30 colin and him finds rocks in miny places out doors Colin and he find rocks in many places outdoors. the rocks in my poket has gold flecks The rocks in my pocket have gold flecks.

31 Mrs. Johnson got out her big Packard touring car, and my father got in. The words her and my are possessive pronouns.

32 Some pronouns show who or what owns, or possesses, something. This kind of pronoun is a possessive pronoun. My, mine, you, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns. Ill look at your rock collection, and then you look at mine.

33 Builders use rock in their work. their Your walls and floors are made of rock. your The cement in our driveway comes from rocks. our

34 Mr. Ferguson used limestone walls in his house. his Mrs. Ferguson has marble floors in her living room. her

35 There are white cliffs in England, and the cliffs color comes from limestone. (their, its) their One beautiful area in Arizona stands out because the areas rocks are red. (their, its) its

36 We took a road through the mountains, and the mountains colors amazed us. (our, their) their The rocks on your side were yellow, while the rocks on my side were orange. (mine, yours) mine

37 Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out-

38 prepaid midnight overflow outdoors outline overgrown prefix Midwest pretest midpoint outgoing overtime overdue outside outfield precaution prediction midsection overweight prehistoric

39 Question of the Day Why did the narrators father open a gas station instead of pursuing a career involving rocks?

40 Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out- Context Clues Generalize Prior Knowledge Vocabulary Fluency: Choral Reading Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Unique Interests Earth Science

41 Pages

42 Pages

43 Fluency: Choral Reading

44 Turn to page 72. As I read, notice how my voice changes as I use characterizations to read the dialogue. We will practice as a class doing three choral readings of page 72.

45 Grammar: Possessive Pronouns

46 the strangeest rocks are hers The strangest rocks are hers. didnt she find them in the Middwest Didnt she find them in the Midwest?

47 Some pronouns show who or what owns, or possesses, something. This kind of pronoun is a possessive pronoun. My, mine, you, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns.

48 Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out-

49 prepaid midnight overflow outdoors outline overgrown prefix Midwest pretest midpoint outgoing overtime overdue outside outfield precaution prediction midsection overweight prehistoric

50 Question of the Day In what way did the narrators fathers unique interest in rocks prove valuable to him and his family?

51 Prior Knowledge Context Clues Cause and Effect Vocabulary Fluency: Model Characterization Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out- Unique Interests Earth Science Careers

52 Pages

53 Fluency: Model Characterization

54 Turn to page 74. As I read, notice how I change my voice as I read the dialogue depending on which character is talking. We will practice reading as a class by reading this page orally three times.

55 Grammar: Possessive Pronouns

56 that black rock of theirs are unnown to me That black rock of theirs is unknown to me. the yellow rock was found in the camp ground by juan and he The yellow rock was found in the campground by Juan and him.

57 Some pronouns show who or what owns, or possesses, something. This kind of pronoun is a possessive pronoun. My, mine, you, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns.

58 Using possessive pronouns makes writing smoother by avoiding the repetition of a noun. Repetitious: Sandra showed us Sandras rocks in Sandras room. Smoother: Sandra showed us her rocks in her room.

59 Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out-

60 prepaid midnight overflow outdoors outline overgrown prefix Midwest pretest midpoint outgoing overtime overdue outside outfield precaution prediction midsection overweight prehistoric

61 Question of the Day What are some characteristics of rocks that make them unique or special?

62 R-Controlled Vowels Poetry Reading Across Texts Content-Area Vocabulary Fluency: Choral Reading Poetry Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out- Start a Rock Museum

63 Pages

64 Fluency: Choral Reading

65 Turn to page 81. We will choral read Everybody Needs a Rock, Rule Number 2 three times. Read the poem with rhythm, pretending you are the author.

66 Grammar: Possessive Pronouns

67 hers green rock was finded in South america Her green rock was found in South America. rob and them displayed the rocks in ms shaws room Rob and they displayed the rocks in Ms. Shaws room.

68 Some pronouns show who or what owns, or possesses, something. This kind of pronoun is a possessive pronoun. My, mine, you, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns.

69 Test Tip: You may be asked to identify possessive pronouns. Do not confuse possessive pronouns with possessive nouns.

70 Possessive nouns have apostrophes. Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes. Example: Tims rocks were the most unusual (possessive noun) His rocks were the most unusual. (possessive pronoun)

71 Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out-

72 prepaid midnight overflow outdoors outline overgrown prefix Midwest pretest midpoint outgoing overtime overdue outside outfield precaution prediction midsection overweight prehistoric

73 Question of the Day When is valuable to have unique interests?

74 Build Concept Vocabulary Generalize Paraphrase Context Clues Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out- Unique Interests

75 When you read, you can sometimes make a general statement about what you have read. A general statement tells how some things are mostly alike or all alike. Look for examples. Ask what they have in common.

76 To paraphrase is to restate a sentence or paragraph in your own words. When you paraphrase, it is important to keep the meaning and ideas of the original statement.

77 When you paraphrase, think about what the writer said and then retell it in your own words. When you paraphrase, be sure never to copy the exact words from a sentence or passage.

78 You can use context clues to determine the meaning of multiple-meaning words. List any unknown words you find as you read Rocks in His Head. Create a chart showing the unknown word, helpful context clues, and their definition of the word based on its context.

79 WordContext CluesMeaning

80 Hobby words, such as collector, refer to things people do for fun or find interesting. Use reference sources to make lists of words that refer to hobbies.

81 Grammar: Possessive Pronouns

82 the small rock is mine and the big one is your The small rock is mine, and the big one is yours. can we put them both in the disply kase Can we put them both in the display case?

83 Some pronouns show who or what owns, or possesses, something. This kind of pronoun is a possessive pronoun. My, mine, you, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns.

84 Prefixes are word parts at the beginning of words that change its meaning. prepaid What is the base word? What does it mean? The prefix pre- means before. What does prepaid mean?

85 When I read a word like prepaid, I can figure out what it means by looking at its parts. I know pre- is a prefix. If I cover the prefix, I see the word paid. I know paid means bought or gave money for.

86 I also know pre- means before. So prepaid must mean bought before or ahead of time. My mother prepaid for the plane tickets. My mother bought the tickets ahead of time. That makes sense.

87 Do the same thing to figure out these other words that begin with prefixes. midnight overeat outsmart

88 prehistory overpaid midday outweigh overslept midsection outbid preheat We took a midwinter vacation last year. Jess outran me in the race. We overcooked the turkey this year. I went to preschool when I was four years old.

89 We studied the r-controlled vowel /er/ spelled ir, er, ur, ear, and or. Read this sentence to yourself. Raise your hand when you know which word has the r-controlled vowel /er/ sound.

90 Last Thursday we went to the movies. Thursday Which letters stand for /er/ in Thursday? The nurse gave me a shot. nurse

91 worldly verb thirteen urban lurk stirrup fern thirsty research heard furnish undershirt

92 Does every sentence have a noun and a verb? Renee has seen that movie thirty times. David is trying to earn enough money to buy a new bike.

93 Clarify Directions

94 Describe something you have done that involved following directions. Directions are often numbered. Follow the directions in numerical order.

95 Read all of the directions before completing any one step. Gather any materials that you need. Make sure each step is complete before continuing. If the directions include diagrams, study them carefully. Use this information to help understand what the directions say.

96 Spelling: Prefixes: pre-, mid-, over-, out-

97 prepaid midnight overflow outdoors outline overgrown prefix Midwest pretest midpoint outgoing overtime overdue outside outfield precaution prediction midsection overweight prehistoric

98 Spelling City: Spelling Words Vocabulary Words Vocabulary Words Other Vocabulary Words

99 Story test Classroom webpage, Reading Test AR Other Reading Quizzes Quiz #


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