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Emmeline Pankhurst Atiyah J. Hamilton Ms. Winsleys 3 rd Block Honors English II.

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Presentation on theme: "Emmeline Pankhurst Atiyah J. Hamilton Ms. Winsleys 3 rd Block Honors English II."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emmeline Pankhurst Atiyah J. Hamilton Ms. Winsleys 3 rd Block Honors English II

2 Background Emmeline Pankhurst was born in Manchester, England, in She was a British political activist and leader of the British suffragette movement that helped women win the right to vote, and was dedicated to womens general equality in public life. She married Richard Pankhurst, in 1878, a lawyer known for supporting women's right to vote; Richard and Emmeline had five children over the course of the next ten years. On November 13,1913, in Hartford Connecticut, she delivered her speech, titled Freedom or Death, which expressed her support and feelings towards womens rights.

3 Video of Speech There was no form of audio or video in the time period that this speech was given. So here is a video of someone reenacting part of the speech.

4 Me Giving the Speech

5 SOAPSTONE: Subject Subject: Emmeline Pankhurst stands up for women and explains the motive behind the growing aggressiveness and militancy in the acts of revolution that were occurring in order to win the war of women suffrage. Examples from the speech: - It has become the subject of revolution and civil war, and so tonight I am not here to advocate woman suffrage. - I am here as a soldier who has temporarily left the field of battle in order to explain…what civil war is like when civil war is waged by women. - But since I am a woman it is necessary in the twentieth century to explain why women have adopted revolutionary methods in order to win the rights of citizenship.

6 SOAPSTONE: Occasion Occasion: On a fundraising tour of the United States during the time of a suffrage movement. In Hartford, Connecticut. Early 1900s. Examples from the speech: - Many people come to Hartford to address meetings as advocates of some reform. - … I address a meeting in Hartford. - …to come and carry out this somewhat arduous tour in the United States of America.

7 SOAPSTONE: Audience Audience: Americans, England, women, political leaders, law/government, men, society, politicians, legislation. Examples from the speech: - I am here as a person who, according to the law courts of my country, it has been decided, is of no value to the community at all… - They have said to us government rests upon force, the women haven't force so they must submit. - I ask American men in this meeting, what would you say if in your state you were faced with that alternative…

8 SOAPSTONE: Purpose Purpose: To persuade people of the battle regarding women and their place in society. To explain why more aggressive and militant methods were being taken for womens suffrage. Examples from the speech: - I might spend two or three nights dealing with the industrial situation as it affects women, with the legal position of women, with the social position of women. - Part of the militant movement for woman suffrage has had that effect, that women have learned to look facts in the face… - Well, can you wonder that all these things make us more militant? - You must make women count as much as men; you must have an equal standard of morals..

9 SOAPSTONE: Speaker Speaker: Emmeline Pankhurst. A woman who believes in fighting for womens suffrage. Someone fed up with the injustice towards women in society. A brave, passionate, and relentless individual. A leading example of suffragists. Examples from the speech: - I am not only here as a soldier temporarily absent from the field at battle… - I come to ask you to help to win this fight. - I dare say…

10 SOAPSTONE: Tone Tone: Defensive, Explanatory, Persuasive, Urgent, Objective, Proud, Sharp, Sarcastic, Zealous, Didactic, Candid Examples from the speech: - I am here - and that, I think, is the strangest part of my coming - I am here as a person who, according to the law courts of my country, it has been decided… -But since I am a woman it is necessary in the twentieth century to explain why women have adopted revolutionary methods in order to win the rights of citizenship. - So I make no apologies for coming, and I make no apologies… - I want to say that I am very thankful to you for listening to me here tonight…

11 Analysis - Paraphrase I am here as a soldier who has temporarily left the field of battle in order to explain - it seems strange it should have to be explained - what civil war is like when civil war is waged by women. I am not only here as a soldier temporarily absent from the field at battle; I am here - and that, I think, is the strangest part of my coming - I am here as a person who, according to the law courts of my country, it has been decided, is of no value to the community at all: and I am adjudged because of my life to be a dangerous person, under sentence of penal servitude in a convict prison. So you see there is some special interest in hearing so unusual a person address you. I dare say, in the minds of many of you - you will perhaps forgive me this personal touch - that I do not look either very like a soldier or very like a convict, and yet I am both. - In this paragraph, Emmeline uses her personal testimony as an example of why the lack of womens suffrage is an issue. She provides a background of what she and other women have gone through in order to give the audience insight.

12 Analysis - Paraphrase We women see so clearly the fact that the only way to deal with this thing is to raise the status of women; first the political status, then the industrial and the social status of women. You must make women count as much as men; you must have an equal standard of morals; and the only way to enforce that is through giving women political power so that you can get that equal moral standard registered in the laws of the country. - In this section of the speech Emmeline emphasizes the overall point that is trying to be made, by women, which is the desire for their equality in society, and what it is going to take to get there.

13 Major Premise/Theme/Idea Well now, I want to argue with you as to whether our way is the right one: I want to explain all these things that you have not understood: I want to make you understand exactly what our plan of campaign has been because I have always felt that if you could only make people understand most people's hearts are in the right place and most people's understandings are sound and most people are more or less logical - if you could only make them understand. - This paragraph represents the main idea or theme because it sums up the sole purpose Emmeline giving the speech. Throughout the whole speech her motive is to explain what women are going through in terms of equality, and why their efforts of ending their social injustice has lead to the more aggressive method of militancy.

14 Ethos I am here as a soldier who has temporarily left the field of battle in order to explain - it seems strange it should have to be explained - what civil war is like when civil war is waged by women. I am not only here as a soldier temporarily absent from the field at battle; I am here - and that, I think, is the strangest part of my coming - I am here as a person who, according to the law courts of my country, it has been decided, is of no value to the community at all: and I am adjudged because of my life to be a dangerous person, under sentence of penal servitude in a convict prison. So you see there is some special interest in hearing so unusual a person address you. I dare say, in the minds of many of you - you will perhaps forgive me this personal touch - that I do not look either very like a soldier or very like a convict, and yet I am both. - This section of the speech serves as a great representation of ethos because it gives background of what Emmeline has gone though herself in dealing with equality as a woman. - This is at the beginning of the speech, and it gives her credibility for why she is reliable source and worth listening to, because not only is she about to talk about womens suffrage, but her experiences are a prime example of the hardships of women.

15 Pathos You have two babies very hungry and wanting to be fed. One baby is a patient baby, and waits indefinitely until its mother is ready to feed it. The other baby is an impatient baby and cries lustily, screams and kicks and makes everybody unpleasant until it is fed. Well, we know perfectly well which baby is attended to first. That is the whole history of politics. Putting sentiment aside, people who really want reforms learn that lesson very quickly. - This is an distinct example of pathos because Emmeline uses this example of two babies in her speech to pull at the feelings of the audience; she goes into depth of how the impatient baby cries and screams, and how everyone else surrounding the baby also feels in result. - She does this in order to give the audience a situation that they can all relate to together no matter what gender. - She wants the audience to relate this unpleasant feeling to the way the women were feeling during that time period.

16 Logos It is perfectly evident to any logical mind that when you have got the vote, by the proper use of the vote in sufficient numbers, by combination, you can get out of any legislature whatever you want, or, if you cannot get it, you can send them about their business and choose other people who will be more attentive to your demands, But, it is clear to the meanest intelligence that if you have not got the vote, you must either submit to laws just or unjust, administration just or unjust, or the time inevitably comes when you will revolt against that injustice and use violent means to put an end to it, That is so logically correct that we hear politicians today talk about the inherent right of revolution and rebellion on the part of human beings suffering from an intolerable injustice… - This represents logos because Emmeline states the facts of the vote. - She uses this to appeal to the logic reason for why women have resulted to a more aggressive method in winning the battle of womens equality and suffrage. - I think that this was effective because she backs up the motive of women with past occurrences that relate.

17 Rhetorical Devices It was done, and it was proved to the authorities that weak women, suffrage women, as we are supposed to be, had enough ingenuity to create a situation of that kind. Now, I ask you, if women can do that, is there any limit to what we can do except the limit we put upon ourselves? - This is an example of a rhetorical question because she gives you the answer to the question through the previous actions that she describes of the women. It is a question that has an obvious answer and is apparent to the audience by the words she has already spoken. This is effective because it causes the audience to reflect and think about all that Emmeline is saying.

18 Rhetorical Devices I come in the intervals of prison appearance: I come after having been four times imprisoned under the "Cat and Mouse Act", probably going back to be rearrested as soon as I set my foot on British soil. I come to ask you to help to win this fight. - This is an example of repetition, and in a way parallelism. Emmeline repeatedly restates I come to emphasize her words, and bring a good conclusion to her speech, as she did with her introduction.

19 Literary Devices I have used the domestic illustration in Hartford, but it is a very good one: it is quite worth using again. You have two babies very hungry and wanting to be fed. One baby is a patient baby, and waits indefinitely until its mother is ready to feed it. The other baby is an impatient baby and cries lustily, screams and kicks and makes everybody unpleasant until it is fed. Well, we know perfectly well which baby is attended to first. - This quote provides an example of allusion. Emmeline makes a reference to an event that takes place in families. This reference provides an illustration for the audience in there minds in order to get better in tune with what she was saying. some valuable plants have suffered in that house - This is an example of personification because Emmeline gives human characteristics to a plant, saying that it had suffered. This is effective in her speech because in a way she is trying to make the uproar about the women destroying plants and buildings sound silly.

20 Powerful Lines Men have done splendid things in this world; they have made great achievements in engineering; they have done splendid organization work; but they have failed, they have miserably failed, when it has come to dealing with the lives of human beings. - This is a powerful line because it emphasizes the importance of making sure the lives of EVERY human being is fair, and how men in general have failed to do so by treating women in a society as less than equal. It emphasizes why the whole uproar of women suffrage was even started by defining the true source.

21 Powerful Lines "Put them in prison," they said, "that will stop it." But it didn't stop it. - This is powerful because it accentuates the determination and persistence that these women had in fighting for their equality. This determination is what resulted in victory for the equality of women later down the road.

22 To Follow… This speech sparked the beginning of a better future of equality for women everywhere. It led to the Representation of People Act in 1918, which granted voting rights to women over 30 years of age. She died the year that Britain allowed women to vote in 1928.

23 Questions?


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