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Buddhist Stories and the Dhammapada The Mustard Seeds Eating Stale Food Crying for the Moon Dhammapada Verses 1 and 2 Rahulas Mirror.

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Presentation on theme: "Buddhist Stories and the Dhammapada The Mustard Seeds Eating Stale Food Crying for the Moon Dhammapada Verses 1 and 2 Rahulas Mirror."— Presentation transcript:

1 Buddhist Stories and the Dhammapada The Mustard Seeds Eating Stale Food Crying for the Moon Dhammapada Verses 1 and 2 Rahulas Mirror

2 The Mustard Seeds Once upon a time, there lived in Savatthi, a girl called Kisa Gotami who belonged to the lowest caste. Despite her poverty, she had kindness and wisdom. A rich merchant, seeing her inner qualities, eventually married her.

3 The Mustard Seeds Once upon a time, there lived in Savatthi, a girl called Kisa Gotami who belonged to the lowest caste. Despite her poverty, she had kindness and wisdom. A rich merchant, seeing her inner qualities, eventually married her.

4 The Mustard Seeds Once upon a time, there lived in Savatthi, a girl called Kisa Gotami who belonged to the lowest caste. Despite her poverty, she had kindness and wisdom. A rich merchant, seeing her inner qualities, eventually married her.

5 The Mustard Seeds However, the family of her husband despised her because of she came from a low caste. After a few years, she gave birth to a baby boy. Her husbands family began to accept her because she provided him with a son, and her happiness knew no bounds.

6 The Mustard Seeds However, the family of her husband despised her because of she came from a low caste. After a few years, she gave birth to a baby boy. Her husbands family began to accept her because she provided him with a son, and her happiness knew no bounds.

7 The Mustard Seeds Sadly, the little baby boy suddenly died one night. Mad with grief, she went to all her neighbours carrying the dead child and asking for medicine to bring him back to life. They all told her that the baby was dead but she refused to accept it.

8 The Mustard Seeds Sadly, the little baby boy suddenly died one night. Mad with grief, she went to all her neighbours carrying the dead child and asking for medicine to bring him back to life. They all told her that the baby was dead but she refused to accept it.

9 The Mustard Seeds Sadly, the little baby boy suddenly died one night. Mad with grief, she went to all her neighbours carrying the dead child and asking for medicine to bring him back to life. They all told her that the baby was dead but she refused to accept it.

10 The Mustard Seeds Eventually a kind man told her to seek the help of the Buddha. She rushed to see him begging him to bring her son back to life. The Buddha told her to bring him some mustard seeds. But they must come from a house where no one had lost a child, husband, parent, or friend.

11 The Mustard Seeds Eventually a kind man told her to seek the help of the Buddha. She rushed to see him begging him to bring her son back to life. The Buddha told her to bring him some mustard seeds. But they must come from a house where no one had lost a child, husband, parent, or friend.

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14 The Mustard Seeds Kisa Gotami, full of hope, then went back to the city to look for the mustard seeds. Every house pitied her and offered her some seeds to help. But there wasnt a house where no one could say that they had not lost a child, husband, parent, or friend.

15 The Mustard Seeds Kisa Gotami, full of hope, then went back to the city to look for the mustard seeds. Every house pitied her and offered her some seeds to help. But there wasnt a house where no one could say that they had not lost a child, husband, parent, or friend.

16 The Mustard Seeds Unable to find the mustard seeds, she left the city in despair and wandered around the countryside. As night began to fall, she saw the lights in the city grow bright, flicker then become dark again.

17 The Mustard Seeds Unable to find the mustard seeds, she left the city in despair and wandered around the countryside. As night began to fall, she saw the lights in the city grow bright, flicker then become dark again.

18 The Mustard Seeds She then began to see that it is the nature of life that we are born, live our lives, then eventually must die. And as she suffered the loss of a loved one, so too had everyone else in the city. She realized that death is common to all and is something that everyone must face one day.

19 The Mustard Seeds She then began to see that it is the nature of life that we are born, live our lives, then eventually must die. And as she suffered the loss of a loved one, so too had everyone else in the city. She realized that death is common to all and is something that everyone must face one day.

20 The Mustard Seeds Seeing the truth, she buried her son then returned to the Buddha. She took Refuge, become one of his disciples and eventually attained enlightenment. Death is something we must eventually face. It is the impermanent nature of our lives.

21 The Mustard Seeds Seeing the truth, she buried her son then returned to the Buddha. She took Refuge, become one of his disciples and eventually attained enlightenment. Death is something we must eventually face. It is the impermanent nature of our lives.

22 The Mustard Seeds The Buddha advised us to contemplate on death. This will serve to remind us that we will eventually one day die. Facing this truth will enable us to see things more clearly, live our lives more responsibly and help us to become more calm and peaceful.

23 The Mustard Seeds The Buddha advised us to contemplate on death. This will serve to remind us that we will eventually one day die. Facing this truth will enable us to see things more clearly, live our lives more responsibly and help us to become more calm and peaceful.

24 Eating Stale Food Once upon a time, in a city called Bhaddiya, a daughter was born to Dhananjaya, the citys treasurer. She was called Visakha and grew up to be bright and beautiful, and had a kind and generous nature.

25 Eating Stale Food Once upon a time, in a city called Bhaddiya, a daughter was born to Dhananjaya, the citys treasurer. She was called Visakha and grew up to be bright and beautiful, and had a kind and generous nature.

26 Eating Stale Food Once upon a time, in a city called Bhaddiya, a daughter was born to Dhananjaya, the citys treasurer. She was called Visakha and grew up to be bright and beautiful, and had a kind and generous nature.

27 Eating Stale Food When she became a teenager, some Brahmins saw Visakha and thought she would be an ideal wife for their master Punnavaddhana, the son of a millionaire named Migara. Accordingly, they made arrangements for Visakha to be married to Punnavaddhana.

28 Eating Stale Food When she became a teenager, some Brahmins saw Visakha and thought she would be an ideal wife for their master Punnavaddhana, the son of a millionaire named Migara. Accordingly, they made arrangements for Visakha to be married to Punnavaddhana.

29 Eating Stale Food From the day Visakha arrived in Savatthi, the city of her husband, she was kind and generous to everyone in the city and everyone loved her. However, Visakha's father-in-law, Migara, was unhappy with her because she was a devout follower of the Buddha while he was not.

30 Eating Stale Food From the day Visakha arrived in Savatthi, the city of her husband, she was kind and generous to everyone in the city and everyone loved her. However, Visakha's father-in-law, Migara, was unhappy with her because she was a devout follower of the Buddha while he was not.

31 Eating Stale Food He was a follower of naked ascetics, and while very wealthy, he was not a generous man. Migara looked for a chance to break off the marriage between his son and Visakha, but her conduct was faultless.

32 Eating Stale Food He was a follower of naked ascetics, and while very wealthy, he was not a generous man. Migara looked for a chance to break off the marriage between his son and Visakha, but her conduct was faultless.

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35 Eating Stale Food One day, he was eating some sweet rice porridge from a golden bowl when a monk entered the house for alms. Although Migara saw the monk, he continued to eat as if he had not. He ignored the monk and continued with his meal.

36 Eating Stale Food One day, he was eating some sweet rice porridge from a golden bowl when a monk entered the house for alms. Although Migara saw the monk, he continued to eat as if he had not. He ignored the monk and continued with his meal.

37 Eating Stale Food Visakha politely told the monk, "Pass on, Venerable Sir, my father- in-law is eating stale food." Now Migara saw his chance to break off the marriage as he thought she had brought disgrace to his family with her remark.

38 Eating Stale Food Visakha politely told the monk, "Pass on, Venerable Sir, my father- in-law is eating stale food." Now Migara saw his chance to break off the marriage as he thought she had brought disgrace to his family with her remark.

39 Eating Stale Food Furious, he ordered her to be expelled from the house. Visakha, calmly explained that he was eating the benefits of his past good deeds and was not doing anything to ensure his continued prosperity.

40 Eating Stale Food Furious, he ordered her to be expelled from the house. Visakha, calmly explained that he was eating the benefits of his past good deeds and was not doing anything to ensure his continued prosperity.

41 Eating Stale Food She said, by ignoring the monk and continuing to eat, wasnt Migaras actions the same as eating stale food? Migara had to admit that she was right and asked her to stay back.

42 Eating Stale Food She said, by ignoring the monk and continuing to eat, wasnt Migaras actions the same as eating stale food? Migara had to admit that she was right and asked her to stay back.

43 Eating Stale Food She agreed on condition that Migara invite the Buddha and his monks for a meal, and change his ways. With her patience and wisdom, Visakha eventually converted her father-in-law to be a follower of the Buddha.

44 Eating Stale Food She agreed on condition that Migara invite the Buddha and his monks for a meal, and change his ways. With her patience and wisdom, Visakha eventually converted her father-in-law to be a follower of the Buddha.

45 Eating Stale Food Every single one of us here has accumulated a lot of good kamma in the past. If not, we will not be sitting here so comfortably in this room. Therefore, let us not just eat stale food. We should carry on accumulating good kamma for the future.

46 Eating Stale Food Every single one of us here has accumulated a lot of good kamma in the past. If not, we will not be sitting here so comfortably in this room. Therefore, let us not just eat stale food. We should carry on accumulating good kamma for the future.

47 Eating Stale Food Every single one of us here has accumulated a lot of good kamma in the past. If not, we will not be sitting here so comfortably in this room. Therefore, let us not just eat stale food. We should carry on accumulating good kamma for the future.

48 Eating Stale Food So how should we accumulate good kamma? Through the practice of dana, sila and bhavana : Dana : generosity, helping others Sila : morality, keeping the Precepts Bhavana : meditation, mental cultivation

49 Eating Stale Food So how should we accumulate good kamma? Through the practice of dana, sila and bhavana : Dana : generosity, helping others Sila : morality, keeping the Precepts Bhavana : meditation, mental cultivation

50 Eating Stale Food So how should we accumulate good kamma? Through the practice of dana, sila and bhavana : Dana : generosity, helping others Sila : morality, keeping the Precepts Bhavana : meditation, mental cultivation

51 Eating Stale Food So how should we accumulate good kamma? Through the practice of dana, sila and bhavana : Dana : generosity, helping others Sila : morality, keeping the Precepts Bhavana : meditation, mental cultivation

52 Eating Stale Food So how should we accumulate good kamma? Through the practice of dana, sila and bhavana : Dana : generosity, helping others Sila : morality, keeping the Precepts Bhavana : meditation, mental cultivation

53 Crying for the Moon Once upon a time, in a city called Savatthi, there lived a very rich but very stingy Brahmin. He had a young son whom he loved dearly. But such was the extent of his stinginess that he even made with his own hands, the gold ornaments he gave his son, to save some money.

54 Crying for the Moon Once upon a time, in a city called Savatthi, there lived a very rich but very stingy Brahmin. He had a young son whom he loved dearly. But such was the extent of his stinginess that he even made with his own hands, the gold ornaments he gave his son, to save some money.

55 Crying for the Moon Once upon a time, in a city called Savatthi, there lived a very rich but very stingy Brahmin. He had a young son whom he loved dearly. But such was the extent of his stinginess that he even made with his own hands, the gold ornaments he gave his son, to save some money.

56 Crying for the Moon One day, his son fell ill from jaundice and the mother pleaded with her husband to get a doctor. However, the father not wanting to pay for a doctor, went about asking for prescriptions so that he can heal the boy himself.

57 Crying for the Moon One day, his son fell ill from jaundice and the mother pleaded with her husband to get a doctor. However, the father not wanting to pay for a doctor, went about asking for prescriptions so that he can heal the boy himself.

58 Crying for the Moon The boy became steadily worse until it was too late. With His Divine Eye, the Buddha saw the dying boy and went to his house for alms. The boy caught sight of the Buddha and his heart was filled with happiness as he died. As a result of his pure mind, he was reborn in a heavenly realm.

59 Crying for the Moon The boy became steadily worse until it was too late. With His Divine Eye, the Buddha saw the dying boy and went to his house for alms. The boy caught sight of the Buddha and his heart was filled with happiness as he died. As a result of his pure mind, he was reborn in a heavenly realm.

60 Crying for the Moon After cremating the body, the father filled with remorse, went to the burning- ground every night to cry for his son. From the heavenly realm, the boy saw his father crying at the burning-ground, came down to earth, and reappeared next to him in the form of a youth.

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63 Crying for the Moon After cremating the body, the father filled with remorse, went to the burning- ground every night to cry for his son. From the heavenly realm, the boy saw his father crying at the burning-ground, came down to earth, and reappeared next to him in the form of a youth.

64 Crying for the Moon The youth then started lamenting and crying loudly, and the father asked him why. The son (in the form of a youth) said that he was crying because he wanted to have the sun and the moon.

65 Crying for the Moon The youth then started lamenting and crying loudly, and the father asked him why. The son (in the form of a youth) said that he was crying because he wanted to have the sun and the moon.

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67 Crying for the Moon The father said, why are you crying for the sun and the moon which you cannot get? You are being foolish! The youth replied, at least the sun and the moon are there in existence. You are even more foolish because you are crying for your dead son who is no more!

68 Crying for the Moon The father said, why are you crying for the sun and the moon which you cannot get? You are being foolish! The youth replied, at least the sun and the moon are there in existence. You are even more foolish because you are crying for your dead son who is no more!

69 Crying for the Moon The father realized the truth of the youths words and asked who he is. The youth then revealed himself as his son. He then told his father of his heavenly rebirth due to his happy thoughts at seeing the Buddha as he passed away.

70 Crying for the Moon The father realized the truth of the youths words and asked who he is. The youth then revealed himself as his son. He then told his father of his heavenly rebirth due to his happy thoughts at seeing the Buddha as he passed away.

71 Crying for the Moon The next day, the father offered alms to the Buddha soon began to realize the Dhamma. Therefore, avoid crying for the moon or for things which are impossible or not even in existence.

72 Crying for the Moon The next day, the father offered alms to the Buddha soon began to realize the Dhamma. Therefore, avoid crying for the moon or for things which are impossible or not even in existence.

73 Crying for the Moon Avoid dwelling in the past, either by regretting past mistakes or basking in past glories. Learn from them, then move on. The past is no more in existence.

74 Crying for the Moon Avoid dwelling in the past, either by regretting past mistakes or basking in past glories. Learn from them, then move on. The past is no more in existence.

75 Crying for the Moon Avoid dreaming of the future, either by worrying about unforeseen circumstances or by building castles in the air. Plan as best you can, then return to the present. The future is yet to come into existence.

76 Crying for the Moon Avoid dreaming of the future, either by worrying about unforeseen circumstances or by building castles in the air. Plan as best you can, then return to the present. The future is yet to come into existence.

77 Crying for the Moon What matters most is the present. By living in the present, we can see things more clearly and live our lives to the fullest.

78 Crying for the Moon What matters most is the present. By living in the present, we can see things more clearly and live our lives to the fullest.

79 The Dhammapada This is a collection of 423 verses attributed to the Buddha, and consists of teachings for the benefit of both the Sangha and laity. It is divided into 26 chapters and arranged according to topics, and the first two verses are among the most well-known teachings in Buddhism.

80 The Dhammapada This is a collection of 423 verses attributed to the Buddha, and consists of teachings for the benefit of both the Sangha and laity. It is divided into 26 chapters and arranged according to topics, and the first two verses are among the most well-known teachings in Buddhism.

81 The Dhammapada This is a collection of 423 verses attributed to the Buddha, and consists of teachings for the benefit of both the Sangha and laity. It is divided into 26 chapters and arranged according to topics, and the first two verses are among the most well-known teachings in Buddhism.

82 Dhammapada Verse 1 Mind is the forerunner of all evil states. Mind is chief and evil states are all mind-made. If one speaks or acts with a corrupt mind; Suffering follows as the wheel follows the hoof of the ox.

83 Dhammapada Verse 1 Mind is the forerunner of all evil states. Mind is chief and evil states are all mind-made. If one speaks or acts with a corrupt mind; Suffering follows as the wheel follows the hoof of the ox.

84 Dhammapada Verse 1 Mind is the forerunner of all evil states. Mind is chief and evil states are all mind-made. If one speaks or acts with a corrupt mind; Suffering follows as the wheel follows the hoof of the ox.

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86 Dhammapada Verse 2 Mind is the forerunner of all good states. Mind is chief and good states are all mind-made. If one speaks or acts with a pure mind; Happiness follows as ones own shadow that never leaves.

87 Dhammapada Verse 2 Mind is the forerunner of all good states. Mind is chief and good states are all mind-made. If one speaks or acts with a pure mind; Happiness follows as ones own shadow that never leaves.

88 Dhammapada Verse 2 Mind is the forerunner of all good states. Mind is chief and good states are all mind-made. If one speaks or acts with a pure mind; Happiness follows as ones own shadow that never leaves.

89 Rahulas Mirror After his enlightenment, the Buddha revisited his home town of Kapilavatthu and reunited with his wife, Yasodhara and son, Rahula. Rahula joined the Sangha at the tender age of seven, received many valuable teachings from his father and eventually became an Arahant.

90 Rahulas Mirror After his enlightenment, the Buddha revisited his home town of Kapilavatthu and reunited with his wife, Yasodhara and son, Rahula. Rahula joined the Sangha at the tender age of seven, received many valuable teachings from his father and eventually became an Arahant.

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92 Rahulas Mirror In one of his teachings, the Buddha asked Rahula if he knew what a mirror is for. Rahula, then still only seven years old, answered that a mirror is for reflection. The Buddha replied that in the same way, actions of body, speech and mind should be done with repeated reflection.

93 Rahulas Mirror In one of his teachings, the Buddha asked Rahula if he knew what a mirror is for. Rahula, then still only seven years old, answered that a mirror is for reflection. The Buddha replied that in the same way, actions of body, speech and mind should be done with repeated reflection.

94 Rahulas Mirror In one of his teachings, the Buddha asked Rahula if he knew what a mirror is for. Rahula, then still only seven years old, answered that a mirror is for reflection. The Buddha replied that in the same way, actions of body, speech and mind should be done with repeated reflection.

95 Rahulas Mirror Before one does any action of body, speech or mind, one should reflect whether that action will harm our self, others, or both. If so, then it is an unwholesome action because it will result in suffering, and that action of body, speech or mind should thus be avoided.

96 Rahulas Mirror Before one does any action of body, speech or mind, one should reflect whether that action will harm our self, others, or both. If so, then it is an unwholesome action because it will result in suffering, and that action of body, speech or mind should thus be avoided.

97 Rahulas Mirror If not, then we may proceed with that action of body, speech or mind. Therefore, we should train ourselves by constantly reflecting on our actions of body, speech and mind, and thereby eventually purify ourselves.

98 Rahulas Mirror If not, then we may proceed with that action of body, speech or mind. Therefore, we should train ourselves by constantly reflecting on our actions of body, speech and mind, and thereby eventually purify ourselves.

99 The 10 Demeritorious Deeds 1. Killing 2. StealingBodily actions 3. Sexual misconduct 4. Lying 5. SlanderingVerbal actions 6. Harsh speech 7. Gossip 8. Covetousness 9. Ill-willMental actions 10. Wrong view

100 The 10 Demeritorious Deeds 1. Killing 2. StealingBodily actions 3. Sexual misconduct 4. Lying 5. SlanderingVerbal actions 6. Harsh speech 7. Gossip 8. Covetousness 9. Ill-willMental actions 10. Wrong view

101 The 10 Demeritorious Deeds 1. Killing 2. StealingBodily actions 3. Sexual misconduct 4. Lying 5. SlanderingVerbal actions 6. Harsh speech 7. Gossip 8. Covetousness 9. Ill-willMental actions 10. Wrong view

102 The 10 Demeritorious Deeds 1. Killing 2. StealingBodily actions 3. Sexual misconduct 4. Lying 5. SlanderingVerbal actions 6. Harsh speech 7. Gossip 8. Covetousness 9. Ill-willMental actions 10. Wrong view

103 The 10 Meritorious Deeds 1. Compassion 2. GenerosityBodily actions 3. Self-control 4. Truthful speech 5. Kind speechVerbal actions 6. Pleasant speech 7. Meaningful speech 8. Sympathetic joy 9. Loving-kindnessMental actions 10. Right view

104 The 10 Meritorious Deeds 1. Compassion 2. GenerosityBodily actions 3. Self-control 4. Truthful speech 5. Kind speechVerbal actions 6. Pleasant speech 7. Meaningful speech 8. Sympathetic joy 9. Loving-kindnessMental actions 10. Right view

105 The 10 Meritorious Deeds 1. Compassion 2. GenerosityBodily actions 3. Self-control 4. Truthful speech 5. Kind speechVerbal actions 6. Pleasant speech 7. Meaningful speech 8. Sympathetic joy 9. Loving-kindnessMental actions 10. Right view

106 The 10 Meritorious Deeds 1. Compassion 2. GenerosityBodily actions 3. Self-control 4. Truthful speech 5. Kind speechVerbal actions 6. Pleasant speech 7. Meaningful speech 8. Sympathetic joy 9. Loving-kindnessMental actions 10. Right view

107 It is clear that everything stems from the mind. So how do we train our minds?

108 It is clear that everything stems from the mind. So how do we train our minds?

109 The Noble Eightfold Path Right Speech Morality – The Foundation of Everything Right Action Right Livelihood Right EffortMental Development – To Train our Minds Right Mindfulness Right Concentration Right Understanding Wisdom Right Thought

110 The Noble Eightfold Path Right Speech Morality – The Foundation of Everything Right Action Right Livelihood Right EffortMental Development – To Train our Minds Right Mindfulness Right Concentration Right Understanding Wisdom Right Thought

111 The Noble Eightfold Path Right Speech Morality – The Foundation of Everything Right Action Right Livelihood Right EffortMental Development – To Train our Minds Right Mindfulness Right Concentration Right Understanding Wisdom Right Thought

112 The Noble Eightfold Path Right Speech Morality – The Foundation of Everything Right Action Right Livelihood Right EffortMental Development – To Train our Minds Right Mindfulness Right Concentration Right Understanding Wisdom Right Thought

113 The Noble Eightfold Path Right Speech Morality – The Foundation of Everything Right Action Right Livelihood Right EffortMental Development – To Train our Minds Right Mindfulness Right Concentration Right Understanding Wisdom Right Thought

114 Prepared by T Y Lee


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