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Political Science 345: The Legislative Process Lecture 13: Rules and Agenda- Setting Professor Jon Rogowski.

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Presentation on theme: "Political Science 345: The Legislative Process Lecture 13: Rules and Agenda- Setting Professor Jon Rogowski."— Presentation transcript:

1 Political Science 345: The Legislative Process Lecture 13: Rules and Agenda- Setting Professor Jon Rogowski

2 Congressional Workload Bills Enacted Bills Introduced

3 The Steps of the Process StepHouse detailSenate detail IntroductionHouse originates tax bills Senate exclusively considers executive matters Reference to committee Done by Speaker, effectively no right of appeal Done by presiding officer, w/right of appeal Committee consideration (subcommittee nested) Hearing, Mark-up, ReportNot necessary SchedulingCombo of Rules & leadership Leadership-centered negotiations Getting on the calendar Multitude of calendars (union, House, correction, private, DC, discharge) Two calendars (general orders, executive) Getting off the calendar Simple: suspension; Complex: rules Simple: suspension; Complex: unan. consent Setting the parameters of consideration Rules Committee Unanimous consent under threat of filibuster Floor considerationCommittee of the Whole DebateConstrainedCloture AmendmentGermaneness rules strongGermaneness weak Reconciling differencesConference Report

4 Bill Introduction Conference Committee Floor Committee on Rules (Major Legislation) Committee/Subcommittee Hearings and Markup Committee/Subcommittee Hearings and Markup Bill Introduction President Veto Sign into Law Override Veto to Enact Into Law Override Figure 7.1 The Standard Legislative Process for a Bill House on left and Senate on right

5 TABLE 7.1. Major House-Senate Differences in Rules of Practice HouseSenate Does not allow filibustersAllows filibusters on most legislation Has a general rule limiting debateHas no general rule limiting debate Bars non-germane amendmentsHas no general rule barring non-germane amendments Uses special rules from the Rules Committee to schedule major legislation for floor action Relies on unanimous consent agreements to schedule major legislation for floor action Frequently adopts restrictive special rules to limit the number of amendments and limit debate Must rely on unanimous consent or cloture to restrict debate and amendments Uses multiple referral frequentlyRarely uses multiple referral Committees are not easily circumventedCommittees easily circumvented Rules permit efficient action without minority party cooperation Rules do not permit efficient action without minority party cooperation Considers major legislation in the Committee of the Whole firstHas no Committee of the Whole Speaker of the House empowered by House rulesPresiding officer given little power by Senate rules Records votes by electronic deviceNo electronic voting system; roll calls are tabulated manually Source: Collected by authors from House and Senate rules.

6 Special Rules and UCAs Controlling the micro-agenda of legislation is key in both chambers The basis of doing this differs between the two (majoritarian in House, supermajoritarian in Senate) The details matter…

7 A typical bill in the House Report by Committee Placed on calendar Brought off calendar Considered in Committee of the Whole Ultimately considered on the House floor

8 The front of the line Some matters are privileged and thus considered first: –Appropriations –Budget resolution –House administration –Ethics –Rules

9 How are rules adopted? Majority member of the Rules Committee One hour of debate Vote on previous question Vote on rule if previous question passes Alternative rule proposed if previous question fails –Does not happen very often

10 Setting Rules: The Debt Ceiling Debate http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/310531-1

11 How a rule works Common provision: at any time after the adoption of [the rule] the Speaker may declare the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole. The CoW is how the House conducts most of its floor business.

12 Committee of Whole http://www.c-spanarchives.org/clip/3343195

13 Committee of the Whole Parlimentary device House operating under different rules Speaker appoints a chair to preside Quorum is 100 (from Reed) members, not 218 Procedures intended to expedite business Actions are not by the House

14 Kinds of Special Rules Open Rule Closed Rule Hybrid-Open Rule Hybrid-Closed Rule Waiver Rule Self-executing Rule

15 Open Rule All germane amendments in order Amendments are considered under the 5- minute rule in the CoW Pro forma amendments for the purposes of debate –Move to strike the last word.

16 An Open Rule: H.Res. 36 Resolved, That at any time after the adoption of this resolution the Speaker may, pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XVIII, declare the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for consideration of the bill (H.R. 554) to establish a program, coordinated by the National Transportation Safety Board, of assistance to families of passengers involved in rail passenger accidents. The first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. General debate shall be confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. After general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. Each section of the bill shall be considered as read. During consideration of the bill for amendment, the Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may accord priority in recognition on the basis of whether the Member offering an amendment has caused it to be printed in the portion of the Congressional Record designated for that purpose in clause 8 of rule XVIII. Amendments so printed shall be considered as read. At the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment the Committee shall rise and report the bill to the House with such amendments as may have been adopted. The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions.

17 Closed Rule No amendments are in order Typically does not involve the CoW Simple up or down vote on the bill

18 A Closed Rule: H.Res.311 Resolved, That upon the adoption of this resolution it shall be in order without intervention of any point of order to consider in the House the bill (H.R. 3295) to establish a program to provide funds to States to replace punch card voting systems, to establish the Election Assistance Commission to assist in the administration of Federal elections and to otherwise provide assistance with the administration of certain Federal election laws and programs, to establish minimum election administration standards for States and units of local government with responsibility for the administration of Federal elections, and for other purposes. The bill shall be considered as read for amendment. The amendment recommended by the Committee on House Administration now printed in the bill, modified by the amendment printed in the report of the Committee on Rules accompanying this resolution, shall be considered as adopted. The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill, as amended, to final passage without intervening motion except: (1) one hour of debate on the bill, as amended, equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on House Administration; and (2) one motion to recommit with or without instructions.

19 A very complicated Rule: H.Res. 100 Resolved, That at any time after the adoption of this resolution the Speaker may, pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XVIII, declare the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for consideration of the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 83) establishing the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2002, revising the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2001, and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for each of fiscal years 2003 through 2011. The first reading of the concurrent resolution shall be dispensed with.All points of order against consideration of the concurrent resolution are waived. The period of debate on the subject of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2002 that occurred on March 27, 2001, pursuant to the order of the House of March 22, 2001, shall be considered to have been debate on House Concurrent Resolution 83, and the time for debate prescribed in section 305 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 shall be considered to have expired. A further period of general debate shall be confined to the concurrent resolution and shall not exceed 40 minutes equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on the Budget. After such further general debate, the concurrent resolution shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. The amendment specified in part A of the report of the Committee on Rules accompanying this resolution shall be considered as adopted in the House and in the Committee of the Whole. The current resolution, as amended, shall be considered as read. No further amendment shall be in order except those printed in part B of the report of the Committee on Rules. Each amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a Member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, and shall not be subject to amendment. All points of order against the amendments printed in part B of the report are waived except that the adoption of an amendment in the nature of a substitute shall constitute the conclusion of consideration of the concurrent resolution for amendment. After the conclusion of consideration of the concurrent resolution for amendment and a final period of general debate, which shall not exceed 10 minutes equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on the Budget, the Committee shall rise and report the concurrent resolution, as amended, to the House with such further amendment as may have been adopted. The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the concurrent resolution and amendments thereto to final adoption without intervening motion except amendments offered by the chairman of the Committee on the Budget pursuant to section 305(a)(5) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to achieve mathematical consistency. The concurrent resolution shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question of its adoption.

20 Congressman Goss explains the rule Mr. Speaker, H. Res. 100 is a structured rule, as we have just heard the Clerk read. It is fairly typical for bringing forward the annual congressional budget resolution, for today is budget day in the House. For a number of years, we have gotten into a very good habit of managing debate on the budget by asking that all amendments be drafted in the form of substitutes so that Members could consider the whole picture as we debate and weigh our spending priorities. This rule continues that tradition and wisely so in my view. We have gone to great lengths with this rule to juggle the competing needs of having a full debate on a range of issues and perspectives without allowing the process to become so unwieldy that it bogs down in minutia. In that regard, I think the rule is fair in making four, I repeat four substitute amendments, which means we are going to have good debate today. Those amendments reflect an array of points of view. I should note that three of those have Democratic sponsors.

21 Amendments Committee amendments considered first Amendments may not be repetitious Amendments are subject to points of order Amendments must be in writing Amendments must be germane

22 Striking the enacting clause Only in order once a bill has been amended to a substantial degree Offers opponents an opportunity to argue against the bill Rarely succeeds

23 After the CoW House votes on amendments approved by the CoW No other amendments are in order Frequently consider multiple amendments in a single En bloc vote Engrossment and third reading Motion to recommit Final vote on the bill

24 Motion to Recommit With or without instructions With instructions: effectively represents a substitute amendment This motion is a protected right of the Minority Leader Without instructions: effectively kills the bill Often proposed, rarely succeeds

25 History of the MTR

26

27 Rules Committee Arm of the House leadership Hearings involve members only Requests usually made by chair of the reporting committee

28 Shortcuts Suspension of the rules –Requires bipartisan support; discretion of Speaker; 75% of laws enacted this way; 2/3s vote with no amendments; 40 min debate Unanimous consent –Truly noncontroversial matters; pretty uncommon; requires consent of both parties leadership Discharge petition –Majority sign in support of considering a bill

29 Example of a Complex Unanimous Consent Agreement (e.g., during consideration of the Better Education for Students and Teachers Act (6/6/01) Mr. REID. Mr. President, I know there are a number of Senators we have danced round today trying to figure out a time to vote. Prior to this unanimous consent agreement, which will require beginning 5 minutes of discussion at 5:10, the Senator from Delaware, Mr. Biden, wishes to speak for about 15 minutes of the approximately 30 minutes that we have on this Dodd amendment. With that in mind, I ask unanimous consent that at 5:10 p.m. the Senate resume consideration of Bingaman amendment No. 791, that the Bingaman amendment be modified to be a first-degree amendment, and that following 5 minutes of closing debate, equally divided in the usual form, the Senate vote in relation to the Bingaman amendment at 5:15. Further, following disposition of the Bingaman amendment, there be 4 minutes of debate divided in the usual form on the Voinovich amendment No. 389, as modified, followed by a vote in relation to the Voinovich amendment. Further, that no second-degree amendments be in order to these amendments. I say to everybody within the sound of my voice that we will have two votes, first at 5:15, and the other following that. Mr. GREGG. Reserving the right to object, did the Democratic assistant leader decide he didn't want to do the Reed amendment? Mr. REID. Yes. We are going to try in the morning to dispose of the Dodd and Reed amendments. We are unable to do that because of the lateness of the hour. Mr. GREGG. I have no objection. The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.

30 The Senate Two calendars Calendar of General Orders (legislation) Executive Calendar (treaties and nominations) –Treaties survive from session to session –Nominations survey until end of current session –Legislation survives until end of the current Congress

31 Scheduling for noncontroversial bills Most (95%+) is dealt with through UCAs Majority and minority leaders jointly manage this process

32 Scheduling: Major legislation One day rule: Measure must wait on calendar Two day rule: printed report must be available Importance of committee reports Holds

33 UCAs Simple UCAs: procedural, noncontroversial, common Complex UCAs can –Restrict debate –Restrict amendments (# and substance) –Establish order of voting, thresholds, times –Waive points of order

34 In general… Committee reports are important, and controversial Committee reports, floor speeches, and even colloquies between Congressmen … are frail substitutes for bicameral vote upon the text of a law and its presentment to the President. Thompson v. Thompson, 484 U.S. 174, 191-192 (1988)(Scalia, J., concurring). In my view a law means what its text most appropriately conveys, whatever the Congress that enacted it might have intended. The law is what the law says, and we should content ourselves with reading it rather than psychoanalyzing those who enacted it. Bank One of Chicago v. Midwest Bank and Trust Co., 516 U.S.264,279 (1996).

35 Offering complex amendments is more a strategy for the Senate than for the House


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