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Stage Productions and Interpretations of A Dolls House Fabian Ardaya Alisa Atkins Nick Gustoff Rishi Jain Sarah Nelson Kiran Pendyala Kaela Walker.

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Presentation on theme: "Stage Productions and Interpretations of A Dolls House Fabian Ardaya Alisa Atkins Nick Gustoff Rishi Jain Sarah Nelson Kiran Pendyala Kaela Walker."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stage Productions and Interpretations of A Dolls House Fabian Ardaya Alisa Atkins Nick Gustoff Rishi Jain Sarah Nelson Kiran Pendyala Kaela Walker

2 Original Production Information first performance o December 21, 1879 o Copenhagen, Denmark at The Royal Theatre Setting is important o suggests the title A Dolls House (Ibsen ), as it is always in a house o home might be the dolls house, where Nora is trapped in her unrespected role as a wife until she leaves at the end (suggesting the end of her role as someone elses doll (Ibsen 2230) Nora, played by Betty Hennings, in the first production

3 Original Production... Cultural/ Contextual Considerations Nora not thought of highly by husband due to time frame Ibsen wants to show how women were not treated with much respect or seriousness o husband calls her animal or pet names, like squirrel (Ibsen 2186) and songbird (Ibsen 2229) o Nora refers to herself as being treated like a doll-child, and he played with me the way I played with my dolls (Ibsen 2230) low status for women Shows progression of womens mindsets as they gained more independence; realizing the change they can make as well as ability to take decisions for themselves.

4 1880 Alternate Ending Information Some German theatres produced an unauthorized fourth act in which Nora returns to Torvald, begging him to take her back (he feeds her a macaroon and does). Ibsen changed ending for North-German theatres so an altercation would not be made by someone else o Nora does not leave in this version o Instead, Helmer makes Nora visit her children, saying they will be Motherless (Ibsen, no page) Ibsen hoped not to use this version, calling it a barbaric act of violence towards his play o wished not many theatres would perform it o only changed it because the lead actress, Hedwig Niemann- Raabe, would not act the last scene as it was, saying she would never abandon her children

5 1880 Alternate Ending... Cultural/ Contextual Considerations change in location of the performance of the play resulted in a change in plot o possible that German culture would not accept ending as it was cultural conflict with lead actress o being of a different culture or background, she could not accept the plays ending

6 Chinese Production of A Dolls House Information Director of Chinese version is Wu Xiaojiang Setting o 1930s in China Characterization o Nora is again a young Norwegian wife, this time married to a wealthy Chinese man Format o Noras character uses English while all other characters use Chinese o Theatre projects English/Chinese translations on both sides of the stage Comic Relief o character of Krogstad provides comic relief by mixing lots of Pidgin English into his Chinese Theme o play reflects troubles with inter-cultural and inter-racial relationships common to see Western men with Chinese girlfriends or wives, but it is much rarer to see Chinese men with Western girlfriends or wives shows the complexities of a foreign woman with a Chinese man in this version, Nora leaves because she feels she is not fit to be with a Chinese man because she is too Western o compare to Maybe - if your doll gets taken away (Ibsen 2232) leaves instead to escape hollow marriage

7 Chinese Production of A Dolls House... Cultural/ Contextual Considerations being in China, play had to reflect more of the Chinese culture than a European one In keeping the Norwegian woman alongside the Chinese man, it also reflects the clash of cultures; a Western, more liberal culture that was beginning to open doors for women against a Chinese, conservative culture where men are the only voice for the family and treated with all respect. Not only shows clash of feminist beliefs, but also shows culture change for a modernizing (and Westernizing) China.

8 Dollhouse (2003/ 2007) Information produced by Lee Breuer aspects of play: o Uses puppets of couples in the background o Takes place in a dollhouse o Uses dwarves for the male characters Lee Breuer: The patriarchy is in reality three feet tall, but has a voice that will dominate six-foot women. Male power isn't dependent on physical size. At the same time we're exploring the metaphor from the woman's point of view, the way maternal love is lavished on these child-size men, which only infantilizes them further. (Welcome to Lee Breuers Dollhouse)

9 Dollhouse (2003/ 2007)... Cultural/ Contextual Considerations Version used to show how roles hold both men and women back, not just women o Ibsens version: But you neither think nor talk like a man I could join myself to (Ibsen 2232) Nora realizes her husband will not promote her, just hinder her Interpretation for Dollhouse could come from this line, as it shows how her husband is not really a respectable man either

10 2011 A Dolls House Information Performed at the Williamstown Theatre Festival o More modernized; described as if it was in the 1960s, including records and a paper shredder o Clear how women had a bigger role in this production o Nora having to deal with not only being a mother but also juggles having a job. still contains idea of womens lack of equality as wives

11 2011 A Dolls House... Cultural/ Contextual Considerations updated time period to show more of how the story would apply and play out in a later setting o message rather consistent, although details are changed o reflects the desires of the later Feminist movement, working to gain more respect and independence in the workplace as opposed to earlier issues such as women's suffrage

12 A Dolls House Short Film (2012) Information Directed by Carrie Cracknell Modernized version of A Dolls House o changed because of changes in womens status Differences: o Nora has a job has to balance work, taking care of her children, and being a wife tries to show how women have to balance these roles, while their husbands do not

13 A Dolls House Short Film (2012)... 1:10-2:10 & 6:15-6:50 from The Guardian

14 A Dolls House Short Film (2012)... Cultural/ Contextual Considerations Nora in present day would have different problems than in 1800s o newer technologies and further advancement for women stays with theme of original of how women are not treated as equals o...take this letter; go out with it at once. Get hold of a messenger and have him deliver it. Quick now (Ibsen 2210) Helmer rejects any authority of Nora when sending the letter to Krogstad (to fire him) in front of her

15 Sequels and Parodies ( Noras Return, How Nora Returned Home Again: An Epilogue, A Dolls House Repaired, and Breaking a Butterfly) Information In most: Nora is remorseful but stays, or leaves and is punished In A Dolls House - And After, Torvald becomes an alcoholic and the children commit suicide. Mile Fabres La Maison dArgile (The House of Clay) features Noras children, grown up, who hunt down their mother and confront her. A feminist/socialist sequel to the play was written in 1979, entitled What Happened After Nora Left Her Husband; or Pillars of Society o Nora takes odd jobs, including factory worker, mistress, prostitute, political figure, and ends up with a pro-Nazi businessman. Breaking a Butterfly o new version of A Dolls House o performed on in 1884 o In London at Princes Theatre

16 Sequels and Parodies ( Noras Return, How Nora Returned Home Again: An Epilogue, A Dolls House Repaired, and Breaking a Butterfly)... Cultural/ Contextual Considerations Noras suffering extended in some versions, altering the end o continues: Oh, the freezing black water! The depths - down - Oh, I wish it were over (Ibsen 2227) Nora suffers because of what has happened as a result of her forgery. These newer versions do not seem to show her revelation about her imprisonment in her marriage as in Ibsens version. Noras experiences also attempt to overcome her place as a woman in society - her independence and determination is seen as an act of feminism in many versions. o These sequels serve as an attempt to overcome the patriarchal views in the original story, not by changing the story necessarily, but by showing how better off Nora is without her husband.

17 Works Cited Information All About Henrik Ibsen. National Library of Norway, n.d. Web. 19 October IMBD. IMBD.com, Inc., Web. 19 October Ibsen, Henrik. A Doll House. The Norton Introduction to Literature: Ninth Edition. Ed. Alison Booth, J. Paul Hunter, and Kelly J. Mays. New York: W.W Norton & Company, Print. Feldman, Adam. "Jonesing for Nora: A Short History of A Doll's House Sequels." Time Out. N.p., 5 Apr Web. 22 Oct GradeSaver. GradeSaver LLC, Web. 20 October The Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited, Web. 19 October A Study Guide for Educators: A Dolls House. American Stage Theatre Company. American Stage Theatre Company, n.d. Web. 20 October Vincentelli, Elisabeth. House Needs Work, but Youll Rave for Rabe. New York Post. NYP Holdings, Inc., Web. 20 October Welcome to Lee Breuers Dollhouse. The Village Voice News. Village Voice, LLC, Web. 20 October Pictures All About Henrik Ibsen. National Library of Norway, n.d. Web. 19 October IMBD. IMBD.com, Inc., Web. 19 October The Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited, Web. 19 October A Study Guide for Educators: A Dolls House. American Stage Theatre Company. American Stage Theatre Company, n.d. Web. 20 October Vincentelli, Elisabeth. House Needs Work, but Youll Rave for Rabe. New York Post. NYP Holdings, Inc., Web. 20 October 2013.


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