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Principals, Pedagogy & Politics A Look at Assessment in Schools Cameron Symons and Linda Thorlakson.

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Presentation on theme: "Principals, Pedagogy & Politics A Look at Assessment in Schools Cameron Symons and Linda Thorlakson."— Presentation transcript:

1 Principals, Pedagogy & Politics A Look at Assessment in Schools Cameron Symons and Linda Thorlakson

2 Pedagogy

3 Shifts Numerical feedback – descriptive feedback Norm referenced – criterion referenced (outcome –based) Assessment of, - Assessment for, as, and of For vs. of assessment As assessment Activity-oriented or coverage-oriented design to Backward Design Understanding understanding

4 New directions

5

6 Assessment of learning Assessment for learning and as learning

7 Including assessment AS learning

8

9

10 New directions Activity-oriented design or Coverage Oriented Design Backward design

11 Traditional design

12 Backward Design

13 Understanding understanding We will all read a passage and then have a quiz on it.

14 Some people are able to do this without really even trying, but for others it takes patience, concentration, and sometimes a bit of luck. In order to maximize your chances of attaining your goal, it is important to know about the mechanisms that make this process work. This kind of knowledge will help you choose the appropriate time for you to work on this. Timing is very important. To determine the right moment to begin, it is important to keep records of what has happened in the past so that you can estimate when you are most likely to achieve success. As well as relying on past experience, you can use instruments to help you measure when the conditions are best for success. Your own physical health can be important in maximizing your chances of success too. Maintain a healthy weight, include physical activity in your daily routine, eat a healthy diet, limit caffeine intake and minimize your stress level. Things to avoid include smoking, drinking alcohol, and taking medication without the approval of your doctor.

15 Now the quiz... 1.To determine the right time you should: 2.Things to do include: 3.Things to avoid include:

16 The article topic is...

17 Wiggins and McTighe: Backward Planning Identify learning goal Determine acceptable evidence Plan instruction Principles and Pedagogy Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (1998) Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

18 Stiggins: Seven Strategies 1.Provide a clear and understandable vision of the learning target 2.Use examples and models of strong and weak work 3.Offer regular descriptive feedback 4.Teach students to self-assess and set goals 5.Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality at a time 6.Teach students focused revision 7.Engage students Principles and Pedagogy Stiggins, R. J., Arter, J. A., Chappuis, J., & Chappuis, S. (2004) Classroom assessment FOR student learning: Doing it right using it well. ETS Assessment Training Institute.

19 Assessment serves different purposes at different times. Assessment must be planned, purposeful and accurate. Assessment must be balanced, inclusive and flexible. Assessment and instruction are inseparable. For assessment to be helpful to students it must consist of descriptive feedback. Damian Cooper Big Ideas

20 Assessment is a collaborative process that is most effective when many parties are involved. Performance standards are an essential component of effective assessment. Grading and reporting student achievement is a responsive process that requires teachers to exercise their professional judgment. Damian Cooper Big Ideas

21 OConnor: Grading Guidelines 1.Relate grading procedures to learning goals 2.Use criterion-referenced performance standards as reference points 3.Grades should only be based on outcome achievement, not attendance/participation 4.Dont include all scores in grades 5.Use most recent and consistent assessment data 6.Avoid averaging 7.Record evidence of achievement 8.Involve students throughout the assessment process Principles and Pedagogy OConnor, Ken. (2009) How to Grade for Learning K-12 Third Edition. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publishing

22 Rick Wormeli: Fair Isnt Always Equal Grade against the standards, not the routes the student takes or the techniques the teacher uses to achieve those standards. Principles and Pedagogy Rick Wormeli. (2006) Fair isnt Always Equal. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse

23 Is preparing students for the real world a part of our role as teachers? Is inculcating values like punctuality, dependability, attendance, etc. part of this role? What are the boundaries of our assessment practice in relation to this? Should our assessment practices reflect these values and reward students for attendance, punctuality, etc.? Principles and Pedagogy

24 Principles and Pedagogy

25 The political environment is shaped by The legislation and regulations that govern the teaching profession Manitoba Education policies Manitoba Teachers Society Code of Professional Practice and policies Contractual obligations and existing case law on teacher termination Politics

26 Duties of principal 55.1(1)55.1(1) The principal of a school, in consultation with parents or legal guardians and teachers and other specialists, as appropriate, is responsible for the assessment and promotion of pupils enrolled in the school. 55.1(2)55.1(2) In discharging his or her responsibilities under subsection (1), the principal must act in accordance with the policies of the school board. 55.1(3)55.1(3) A school board must not adopt a policy that requires a principal to promote a pupil regardless of whether the pupil has achieved the expected learning outcomes. (C.C.S.M. c. P250 The Public Schools Act) Legislation: (Manitoba Public Schools Act)

27 4(1)4(1) For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act according to their intent, the minister may make such regulations and orders as are ancillary thereto and are not inconsistent therewith; and every regulation or order made under, and in accordance with the authority granted by, this section has the force of law; and without restricting the generality of the foregoing the minister may make regulations (r) prescribing the standard to be attained by pupils on entering or leaving any grade or level in any public school or private school; (r.1) prescribing methods and procedures for the assessment and evaluation of any aspect of pupil achievement; Legislation: Education Administration Act (The Education Administration Act C.C.S.M. c. E10)

28 Responsibilities of Principals: Hiring, assignment and evaluation of teachers 30 A principal is to participate in the hiring, assignment and evaluation of teachers, and may have regard to parental and community views when making recommendations about those matters to the school board. M.R. 68/97 (THE EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION ACT (C.C.S.M. c. E10) Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation. Regulation 468/88 R) Legislation: Education Administration Act

29 Responsibilities of Principals: 29(2) A principal must ensure that parents are provided with information on their children's individual achievement on a regular basis. M.R. 68/97 (THE EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION ACT (C.C.S.M. c. E10) Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation. Regulation 468/88 R) Legislation: Education Administration Act

30 Responsibilities of Teachers: 39 A teacher is responsible for (a) teaching the curriculum prescribed or approved by the minister; (b) providing an effective classroom learning environment; (c) maintaining order and discipline among pupils attending or participating in activities that are sponsored or approved by the school, whether inside or outside the school; (d) advising pupils as to what is expected of them in school, reviewing their assessments with them, and evaluating their progress and reporting on that progress to parents; (e) administering and marking any assessment of pupil performance that the minister may direct, in the manner that the minister directs; (f) ongoing professional development. Legislation: Education Administration Act (THE EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION ACT (C.C.S.M. c. E10) Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation. Regulation 468/88 R)

31 Principal's responsibility 12(1) Subject to subsection (2), and the authority of the superintendent or of a field representative if no superintendent has been appointed, the testing and promotion of students from grades 1 to 12 inclusive is the responsibility of the principal. (M.R. 141/2001; 161/2007 THE EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION ACT (C.C.S.M. c. E10) Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation 468/88 R) Regulations: Educational Administration Act

32 16(4) School divisions and districts shall, in each year, (a) report on pupil evaluation in a manner prescribed or authorized by the minister; and (b) for all subject areas from grades 9 to 12, state pupil marks (i) as percentage scores, or (ii) in another manner authorized by the minister, for the subject areas where the minister is satisfied percentage scores are not assigned. (M.R. 68/97; 161/2007; 132/2008 THE EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION ACT (C.C.S.M. c. E10) Education Administration Miscellaneous Provisions Regulation 468/88 R) Regulations: Educational Administration Act

33 Assessment practice and policy at the provincial and local levels must support students responsibility for their learning. In addition to developing academic knowledge, it is important to support students in the development of lifelong learning skills and values, and that educational practice and policy reflect this. It must be made clear to students that they are responsible for providing evidence of their learning within established timelines, and that there are consequences for not completing work and for submitting work late. Manitoba Education Policy on Academic Responsibility Manitoba Education. (2010) Provincial Assessment Policy, Kindergarten to Grade 12. Winnipeg: Manitoba Education. p. 7.

34 Teachers also have important responsibilities in supporting the learning of all students. Their responsibilities include the following: 1. Establish and clearly communicate expectations regarding assignments. 2. Set and communicate reasonable timelines for assignments and support students in meeting these timelines. 3. Establish, communicate, and apply consequences for late and missing work. Manitoba Education Policy on Academic Responsibility Manitoba Education. (2010) Provincial Assessment Policy, Kindergarten to Grade 12. Winnipeg: Manitoba Education. p. 7.

35 Divisions may not adopt a policy that mandates student promotion regardless of achievement. Students should be placed in the grade that is appropriate for their curricular, cognitive, social, and emotional learning needs. Decisions around promotion or retention of students may have far- reaching implications for student success in school. MB Education Policy on Academic Promotion/Retention Manitoba Education. (2010) Provincial Assessment Policy, Kindergarten to Grade 12. Winnipeg: Manitoba Education. p. 10.

36 1. In Kindergarten to Grade 8, promotion decisions rest with the principal, who consults with teachers, parents, and other specialists as appropriate. 2. In Grades 9 to 12, the final decision on whether or not to grant credits rests with the principal, who consults with teachers, parents, and other specialists as appropriate. MB Education Policy on Academic Promotion/Retention Manitoba Education. (2010) Provincial Assessment Policy, Kindergarten to Grade 12. Winnipeg: Manitoba Education. p. 10.

37 Code of Professional Practice 1. A members first professional responsibility is to her or his students. 2. A member acts with integrity and diligence in carrying out professional responsibilities. and aspects of 3. to 10. The Manitoba Teachers Society Source: https://www.mbteach.org/inside-mts/professionalcode.htmlhttps://www.mbteach.org/inside-mts/professionalcode.html

38 Contractual Obligations Collective Agreement Between The Winnipeg School Division and The Winnipeg Teachers Association of The Manitoba Teachers Society July1, June 30, 2014


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