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1 Open the Door to Forgiveness (Unit 16) Course-book: An Integrated English Course (II) (published by Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press in 2005)

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Presentation on theme: "1 Open the Door to Forgiveness (Unit 16) Course-book: An Integrated English Course (II) (published by Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press in 2005)"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Open the Door to Forgiveness (Unit 16) Course-book: An Integrated English Course (II) (published by Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press in 2005)

2 2 A Preview Background (students to present) Global understanding Paraphrasing & language appreciation Group discussion & debate:Group discussion & debate: –Should we always forgive? –What other guideline(s) could be followed? Summary & assignmentsSummaryassignments

3 3 Global Understanding - 1 How does the writer get started? What is his viewpoint regarding the issue of forgiveness? In what way does he support his point? (para. 1-5)

4 4 1. Introduction It is common for people to feel being hurt. Someone hurt you, and you cannot forget it. It has lodged itself in your memory, where it keeps on hurting. You are not alone. We all muddle our way through a world where even well-meaning people hurt one other. A friend betrays us; a parent abuses us; a spouse leaves us. (different forms of hurt)

5 5 2. Viewpoint Clearly Stated -- THE RIGHT APPROACH TO HEALING IS TO FORGIVE. To support, the writer quotes a philosophers wordsquotes Gives the example of Pope John Paul IIexample GO TO

6 6 The only power that can stop the stream of painful memories is the faculty of forgiving. (Hannah Arendt) BACK

7 7 Pope John Paul II, who walked into a cell to meet Mehmet Ali Agca, the Turkish who attempted to assassinate him, took his hand and forgave him BACK

8 8 3. A Step Back He comments on our reactions to deep and unfair hurts. (para. 4 & 5) He admits: –It is not easy to forgive. –Forgiveness seems almost unnatural. –Our sense of fairness tells us that people should pay for the wrong they do. –Hate is our natural response to deep and unfair hurts. But, he believes in the true merits of forgiveness: – In forgiving we can move from hurting and hating to healing and reconciliation. –Hate is the malignancy that festers and grows, stifling you and threatening our health. –It (Hate) hurts the hater more than the hated.

9 9 4. Viewpoint Enunciated In this way, the author drives home his point of view – forgiveness is a more sensible choice, and it must be cut out – for our own sake.

10 10 Global Understanding - 2 Transition (para. 6) But how can this be done? How can you let go of a hurt, the way a child opens his hands and frees a trapped butterfly? What does the author mean here?

11 11 Global Understanding - 3 What are the authors suggestions regarding how to practice forgiveness? Guidelines

12 12 Guidelines Confront your malice (para.7-9) Separate the wrongdoer from the wrong (para.10-12) Let go of the past (para.13-16) Dont give up on forgiveness (para.17-18) questions

13 13 Answer these questions concerning the four guidelines: What is the first problem in our attempt to achieve forgiveness? What can be learnt from Lizs case? What can we learn from the case of the authors adopted daughter? How does the author understand the guideline Let go of the past in relation with forgiveness? What does C. S. Lewiss example indicate?

14 14 Globel Understanding - 4 The text does not end here … Arguments against forgiveness are cited – TARGET-SETTING the wrongdoer should not be let off the hook forgiveness is a sign of weakness (forgiveness is) a beggars refuge

15 15 Counter-Arguments Vengeance never evens the score. It ties both the injured and the injurer to an endless escalator of retaliation.

16 16 Further Arguments We are seldom merely sinned against. You may contribute to your spouses infidelity by ignoring …, or bring on your childrens rebellion by … The example of Mark -- What does the writer want to show with this example?

17 17 Conclusion Reiteration of proposition (viewpoint): (para.23) When we forgive, we come as close as any human can to the essentially divine act of creation. We heal the hurt and create a new beginning out of past pain. MENU

18 18 Paraphrasing – 1 1.Its surgery of the soul, the loving, healing way to create new beginnings out of past pain. (introductory remarks) 2. Hate is a malignancy that festers and grows, stifling joy and threatening our health. (Para. 5)

19 19 Paraphrasing The fury denied rages beneath the surface and infects all our relationships. (Para. 7) 4. She could not keep up the duplicity. One day she confronted him. His embarrassed denial enabled Liz to see him for the weak person he was. (Para. 9)

20 20 Paraphrasing Forgiving is finding a new vision of the person who has wronged us, the person stripped of his sins – who really lives beneath the cloak of his wrongdoing. (Para. 10) 6. Forgetting too soon may be a dangerous way to escape forgivings inner surgery. (Para.16)

21 21 Paraphrasing Vengeance never evens the score. It ties both the injured and the injurer to an endless escalator or retaliation.(Para. 20) 8.When we forgive, we come as close as any human can to the essentially divine act of creation. We heal the hurt and create a new beginning out of past pain. (Para. 23) MENU

22 22 Lets work together now … 1.Should we always forgive? 2.What are other guidelines for those who are suffering from deep and unfair hurts? MENU

23 23 Summary: Organization Revisited Introduction (para.1-5): –Giving context and background –Stating viewpoint Guidelines (para.6-18) – Offering suggestions Refutation (para.19-22) –raising the opposite view, preparing ground for counter-argument Conclusion (para.23) –Reiterating viewpoint

24 24 Features of Writing Distinctness of viewpoint Powerfulness of arguments Strictness of logic reasoning BACK

25 25 Powerfulness of Arguments Examples of famous figures & ordinary people –Pope John Paul II, C. S. Lewis, a well-established Irish author and scholar –Liz (assistant professor), Cathy (authors adopted daughter), unknown actress (authors friend), Mark (a man) Quotations from Hannah Arendt (philosopher), Bernard Shaw (playwright), Gandhi (political leader), Reinhold Niebuhr (theologian) BACK

26 26 Strictness in Logic Reasoning Setting context and background Presenting viewpoint Enunciating viewpoint Refuting viewpoint Reinforcing viewpoint BACK

27 27 Assignments 1.Exercises: p. 236 – 237 (vocabulary + grammar + translation) 2. Find more quotations or proverbs on forgiveness (pros and cons) in both Chinese and English. Any parallelism? Any differences? Try to give a cultural interpretation. example

28 28 For example: Pros (1) Forgiveness is the fragrance that the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it. (Mark Twain) ( )

29 29 For example: Pros (2) To err is human, the forgive, divine. Alexander Pope ·

30 30 For example: Pros (3) (Forgive others often, but rarely yourself.) (Compromise will make a conflict much easy to resolve.)

31 31 For example: Cons Tit for tat An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. … ……

32 32 The end. Thanks! TITLE


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