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Comparing Performance of Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Entry Doors 1 LU/HSW Hour.

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Presentation on theme: "Comparing Performance of Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Entry Doors 1 LU/HSW Hour."— Presentation transcript:

1 Comparing Performance of Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Entry Doors 1 LU/HSW Hour

2 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Plastpro is a Registered Provider with the American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for all AIA members. Certificates of completion are available for non-members and self- reporting purposes. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods and services should be directed to Plastpro upon completion of this learning unit.

3 Copyright This presentation is protected by U.S. and International copyright laws. Reproduction, distribution, display and use of the presentation without written permission of Plastpro is prohibited. © 2010, Plastpro Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood

4 Learning Objectives Compare and contrast structural and performance features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors. Identify safety features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors and their testing procedures. Describe where fiberglass entry doors may contribute to LEED points in LEED for Homes and LEED V3. Describe how to specify an entry system based on your project requirements. Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood

5 Learning Objectives Compare structural and performance features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors. Identify performance and safety features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors and their testing procedures. ENERGY STAR & NFRC ASTM performance testing Fire ratings Impact resistance Describe where fiberglass entry doors may contribute to LEED points in LEED for Homes and LEED V3. Describe how to specify an entry system based on your project requirements. Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood

6 Structural and Performance Features Doors can impact a home or buildings energy performance, safety, security, accessibility and durability depending on… - Insulation values - Fire ratings - Recycled material content - Frame strength - ADA guidelines - Impact Resistance Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood

7 Determine which features and performance characteristics are most important to each project Environment & Safety - ENERGY STAR, green, fire ratings, lock-position Performance Features - Durability, weather resistance Aesthetics - Aesthetics: color, profile, style Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Structural and Performance Features

8 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Structural and Performance Features: Steel vs. Wood vs. Fiberglass Environment and Safety Best Better Good * General Product Comparison

9 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Structural and Performance Features: Steel vs. Wood vs. Fiberglass Performance Best Better Good * General Product Comparison

10 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Aesthetics Structural and Performance Features: Steel vs. Wood vs. Fiberglass * General Product Comparison Best Better Good

11 The door and frame must perform together -Wood, steel and fiberglass doors are hung primarily in wood or steel frames - Frames are susceptible to the same problems as the door material unless the frames are made of composite frames. Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Fiberglass Entry Doors

12 Learning Objectives Compare structural and performance features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors. Identify performance and safety features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors and their testing procedures. ENERGY STAR & NFRC ASTM performance testing Fire ratings Impact resistance Describe where fiberglass entry doors may contribute to LEED points in LEED for Homes and LEED V3. Describe how to specify an entry system based on your project requirements. Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood

13 Labels identify products that meet stringent energy performance requirements Labeled with their performance measure - U-factor - R-Value - Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) - Visible Transmittance (VT) - Air Leakage (AL) - Condensation Resistance (CR) Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: NFRC

14 ENERGY STAR doors - Lower energy bills - Reduce air leakage - Keep interior environment comfortable ENERGY STAR Performance Ratings are based on climate zone - U-Factor - R-Value - SHGC Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: ENERGY STAR

15 ENERGY STAR Climate Zone Requirements Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: ENERGY STAR

16 Blower Door Tests - Help identify where air leaks into a home - Typically leaks occur at fenestration, plumbing and lighting fixtures - Insulating or effectively filling these penetrations can result in energy and cost savings Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Air & Water Infiltration

17 When specifying a door for your projects, there are several important ASTM test results to consider. ASTM D 1761 ASTM D 1666 ASTM E 283 ASTM E 231 ASTM E 230 ASTM E 547 ASTM E 1886 ASTM E 1996 ASTM E 1425 ASTM F 1455 TAS Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood

18 ASTM D Standard test for mechanical fasteners in wood - Fiberglass has shown to have nearly twice the screw-holding power of wood Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Material Strength ASTM D Standard procedure for wood-working (machining) properties - Fiberglass doors have met requirements for sawing, planning, routing, boring, drilling and chiseling.

19 ASTM E Determines air leakage through a wall assembly under specified air pressure differences at ambient conditions - Identifies doors that can improve energy efficiency of the home Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Air & Water Infiltration ASTM E Determines water penetration resistance under uniform static pressure - Identifies doors that will minimize water damage to the door assembly and surrounding wall.

20 ASTM E Determines structural performance of doors by uniform static air pressure difference - Look for a door that has passed this test Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Air & Water Infiltration ASTM E Determines resistance to water penetration under cyclic static air pressure differences - Performance results will depend on the construction quality and proper installation of the wall and its components

21 ASTM F Test for hollow metal, swinging doors in detention facilities – helps determine how much abuse a door can handle. - Helps improve safety measures in detention facilities Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Strength & Durability ASTM E Tests impact resistance of exterior fenestration products - Identifies products that can withstand impact of large and small objects that would be similar to wind-borne debris during severe weather

22 ASTM E Tests impact resistance of exterior fenestration products - Identifies products that are able to withstand hurricane-like forces Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Strength & Durability TAS Tests impact resistance of exterior cladding and fenestration products - Identifies products that will comply with the strict requirements of the Florida Building Code, Section 1626.

23 ASTM E Determines air leakage relative to sound transmission for exterior fenestration Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Acoustics

24 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance Features: Acoustics Best Better Good * General Product Comparison

25 Warnock Hersey - Fire-retardant core - Compliance to safety & performance - Ratings show time to withstand flame of fire Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance and Safety Features: Fire Ratings Fire Rated Doors - Light commercial & multi family - Wood, steel fiberglass

26 Doorways requiring full user passage shall have a minimum clear opening of 32- inches with the door open at 90 degrees, large enough for a wheelchair to pass through A 10 bottom rail is required by the ADA Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance and Safety Features: ADA & Accessibility

27 Handles, pulls, latches, locks and other operating devices should be easy to grasp with one hand and should not require tight grasping, or twisting to operate. Lever-operating or push-type mechanisms and U-shaped handles are acceptable. Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Performance and Safety Features: ADA & Accessibility * General Product Comparison

28 Learning Objectives Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Compare structural and performance features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors. Identify performance and safety features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors and their testing procedures. ENERGY STAR & NFRC ASTM performance testing Fire ratings Impact resistance Describe where fiberglass entry doors may contribute to LEED points in LEED for Homes and LEED V3. Describe how to specify an entry system based on your project requirements.

29 EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance - Insulated fiberglass doors can contribute to the building envelope for overall insulating performance, which is required to meet or exceed and ENERGY STAR rating of an exterior door Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood LEED for Homes EA Prerequisite 2.1: - Door configuration tested in standard NFRC frames with or without glass should exceed IECC 2009, Fenestration air leakage of <0.5 cfm per ft2 or <2.6L/s/m2) for swing doors - Doors with opaque or insulated glass should exceed the same standard

30 EA Credits 4.1, 4.2 & 4.3 Windows and Glass Doors: Windows and Glass Doors Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood LEED for Homes LEED Referenced Energy Performance Requirements ENERGY STAR ZONE Metric NorthernNorth CentralSouth CentralSouthern 4.1 Good Windows U-factor (prerequisite)SHGCAny Enhanced Windows U-factor Optional, 2ptsSHGCAny Exceptional Windows U-factor Optional, 3ptsSHGCAny Table 1. LEED for homes references the above windows and doors requirements from the ENERGY STAR for Homes national builder option package

31 MR Credits 4.1 and 4.2: Recycled Content - Percent of recycled content must be converted to cost of the product - Projects with 10% of total materials cost with recycled content contribute 1 point - Projects with 20% of total materials cost with recycled content contribute 2 points Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood LEED V3 for New Construction & Major Renovations Example: Door has 10.4% pre-consumer recycled content Door costs $ x.104 = $70.72 per door

32 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood LEED V3 for New Construction & Major Renovations MR Credit 6: Rapidly renewable materials - Projects with 2.5% of total materials costs from rapidly renewable materials contribute 1 point Example - Door has 0.9% rapidly renewable materials - Door costs $ x.009 = $6.12 per door

33 Learning Objectives Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Compare structural and performance features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors. Identify performance and safety features of fiberglass, steel and wood entry doors and their testing procedures. ENERGY STAR & NFRC ASTM performance testing Fire ratings Impact resistance Describe where fiberglass entry doors may contribute to LEED points in LEED for Homes and LEED V3. Describe how to specify an entry system based on your project requirements.

34 To have a complete entry system, you must also consider the door frame Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Structural and Performance Features: Entry Systems Closed Cell Technology - Used to build door frames - Creates stronger dimensions than wood door frames - Will not absorb moisture - Resists splitting and molding - Wood frames rot, warp, crack, etc. - Steel frames rust, dent, and transmit heat and cold - Composite frames along with fiberglass doors resist rot, warp, crack, dent, heat or cold air transmission

35 Full length composite top and bottom rails and stiles of non-porous protection - Prevents water from leaking into the door - Stops build up of mold Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Structural and Performance Features: Composite Entry Systems

36 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass Door

37 Structural and Performance Features:: Composite Entry Systems

38 Environment & Safety… - More energy efficient - Less environmental hazard Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Summary: Fiberglass Entry Doors

39 Aesthetic … - As appealing as wood - Easily painted, stained or machined - Available in many panel profiles - Available with many configurations - Low maintenance required Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Summary: Fiberglass Entry Doors

40 Performance… - May be impact resistant - Have higher insulation values - Have higher strength and durability than wood or steel Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Summary: Fiberglass Entry Doors

41 This concludes the AIA-portion of the learning unit. Please contact us with questions: Peini Spinazzola x5411 Comparing Door Performance: Fiberglass, Steel and Wood Thank You!


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