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How do I know the information I find is good enough? Who What When Where Why How Click to Start © 2008 Bonnie Bredes.

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Presentation on theme: "How do I know the information I find is good enough? Who What When Where Why How Click to Start © 2008 Bonnie Bredes."— Presentation transcript:

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2 How do I know the information I find is good enough? Who What When Where Why How Click to Start © 2008 Bonnie Bredes

3 Instructions Evaluation Survey Additional Resources Who What When Where Why How Quiz Activity If you are beginning this module please click on the Instructions button. If you are continuing from another time please click on the button for the section you are up to.

4 Complete each section by reading about one aspect of website evaluation. Use the Next button to advance forward. At the end of each section you will be given the opportunity to use you new knowledge by reviewing and evaluating websites.

5 After you have completed your evaluation you will be given the option to Continue or return to the Contents to exit. Once you have completed all of the sections take the quiz to check you knowledge. When you have finished follow the instructions to complete the activity.

6 It is important to know who is giving you the information you are looking at so you know whether to believe and trust that information. Ask yourself the following questions to help you determine if the author is credible (believable). Next

7 1. Can you locate the authors name? Look for the authors name by following links such as About or Contact. Sometimes you can find the author at the top or bottom of the web page. Next

8 2. Who is the author? Do you recognize this person or institution (school, company, etc.) by name? If not use Google or another search engine to find out about the authors experience. Next

9 3. Is the author an expert? Can you believe what the author is saying? Check if the author is an expert on(knows about) the subject being discussed. Be cautious before you use information that is from a non-expert. For example, a chef authoring a website about auto mechanics. Next

10 4. Who published the page? Is there contact information? It is important to be able to contact the publisher and author of the webpage so you can ask questions about the information presented. Check at the bottom of the page or under Contact to look for this information. Next

11 Click on the links to look at the following websites about Anthrax: Find the author and click on the button for the site that has information you can trust. Be sure to look at both sites before making your decision. Site 2Site 1 Link for Site 1 Link for Site 2

12 Site 1 is correct The authors of this information work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The website is published by the CDC The CDC is a U.S. government organization Continue

13 Site 2 is Incorrect The author, Gary Novak, says he is an independent scientist. He claims to have a masters degree but does not tell us in what. He also claims to study yeast and mushrooms. This does not make him an expert on Anthrax. A Google search reveals that there are many Gary Novaks. The one who authored this site claims to be a biologist specializing in mushrooms. Continue Site 1 is correct The authors of this information work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The website is published by the CDC The CDC is a U.S. government organization

14 In addition to knowing who is giving you the information, you need to know what kind of information you are getting when you are deciding if you should trust the information on a website. Knowing what you are getting is also useful in determining whether or not you need to find additional information to understand all sides of a topic. Next

15 1. Is the information accurate? Ask yourself if the information makes sense based on what you already know. Check to see if the information you are evaluating agrees with the information in a trusted source such as, the encyclopedia or Virtual Reference Collection Next

16 2. Does the author cite sources? Check if the author tells you where the information came from. Then check some of the sources yourself. Next

17 3. Is the information fact or opinion? Determine if the author is presenting facts or opinions. If the author using emotion to try to persuade you to believe their ideas (opinions) you may have to look at other websites or sources to get the whole picture. Next

18 4. Does the information give you what you need? The website needs to give you enough information to cover your topic. A website that has pictures of Egyptian landmarks is not going to help you write a paper on daily life in Ancient Egypt. Next

19 Look at the following websites Based on WHAT the information is, which site should you use to write your report on daily life in Ancient Egypt? Site 2Site 1 Link for Site 1 Link for Site 2

20 Site 1 is correct The information is factual The information can be checked in other resources The information covers the topic from many perspectives Continue

21 Site 2 is Incorrect This sites main purpose it to sell a book about Ancient Egypt. The site has games and you can even send eCards. While this may be fun it is not informative. Continue Site 1 is correct The information is factual. The information can be checked in other resources. The information covers the topic from many perspectives.

22 Knowing if the information you find is current is important, especially if the information can change regularly. Next

23 1. Can you find the date the site was created or last updated? If there is no date or the site has not been updated in a while the information may not be accurate or relevant any more. Next

24 2. Does the date the information was created or last updated matter for your research? If you are researching an event that is constantly changing, such as the current presidential election, a site that was last updated a week ago will not be up to date. However, if you are trying to find out about the last presidential election, a site that was last updated 2 years ago might have the information you need. Next

25 3. Do the links work and are they current? A site that has not been updated recently may have broken links making it difficult to get the information you are looking for and can make it difficult to check sources. Links to outdated information may not be accurate anymore. Next

26 Look at the following websites Based on WHEN the information was created or last updated which site is going to give you the most current information? Site 2Site 1 Link for Site 1 Link for Site 2

27 Site 2 is correct The site covers information up until 2007 The site was last revised on January 2 2008 Continue

28 Site 1 is incorrect The article was written in 1997. The site was created or last updated in 2002 Continue Site 2 is correct The site covers information up until 2007. The site was last revised on January 2, 2008.

29 The URL (website address) can tell you where your information is coming from. This can help you determine if the source of the information is reliable. You can also check About Us links on the site and use Google to learn more about WHERE your information is coming from. Next

30 Some URL extensions and what they tell you:.com (commercial site) Anyone can have a site ending in the.com domain. The purpose of this extension is for businesses that are trying to make money. Next

31 Some URL extensions and what they tell you:.net (company or person that runs an Internet network) Anyone can have a site ending in the.net domain because anyone can set up a network. Next

32 Some URL extensions and what they tell you:.org (not for profit organization) Most organizations have a specific mission..org sites almost always have a strong bias or point of view that they are trying to convince you to believe. Next

33 Some URL extensions and what they tell you:.edu (an educational institution) Colleges and universities and other schools use this extension, but be careful, many schools host personal websites for their students and faculty. *If you see a tilde (~) in the URL the site is a personal website Next

34 Some URL extensions and what they tell you:.gov (agency of the United States government) These sites will be factual, but may contain bias (a certain point of view) based on United States government policy. Next

35 Look at the following websites Based on the URL extension and WHERE the information is coming from, which site can you trust? Site 2Site 1 Link for Site 1 Link for Site 2

36 Site 1 is correct This site is a United States government sponsored site (.gov). NASA is the agency responsible for space exploration Continue

37 Site 2 is Incorrect This site is a commercial site (.com). From the website it is not clear who Kevin Overstreet is. A Google search reveals that a disc jockey named Kevin Overstreet claims to have created this site in 10 th grade to make his teacher angry. Continue Site 1 is correct This site is a United States government sponsored site (.gov). NASA is the agency responsible for space exploration

38 Understanding WHY someone created a website can help you know whether to trust the information. Links on the site such as About Us or Our Mission can give you information about the purpose of the site. Next

39 Ask yourself these questions: 1. Is the author trying to sell you something? Someone trying to sell a product may not be giving you the whole story. Check sites like www.epinions.com to get comments on products from people who have purchased them.www.epinions.com Continue

40 Ask yourself these questions: 2. Is the author trying to educate or inform you? If the information appears to be educational you can trust it only after you check other sources to determine the accuracy of the information. Continue

41 Ask yourself these questions: 3. Is the author sounding off or on a rant? If the author is giving an opinion out of anger or dissatisfaction, the information is just that…an opinion. Be sure to get the facts before agreeing with someone elses opinion. Continue

42 Ask yourself these questions: 4. Is the author trying to get your support for a cause? If the author is supporting a cause, you will most likely only be getting one side of the story. Make sure you can find information that tells the other side of the story so you have a balanced view of the information before you offer your support. Continue

43 Look at the following websites Based on WHY the site was created, which site is has a less balanced point of view? Site 2Site 1 Link for Site 1 Link for Site 2

44 Site 2 is correct This article presents a balanced view of the genetic engineering controversy. This article is written to inform the reader about the issues discussed at a FDA (Food and Drug Administration) meeting about genetic engineering. Continue

45 Site 1 is Incorrect They admit that based on their impartial review of the evidence their position is that genetically engineered foods can not be proven safe at this time. They are presenting what they consider to be evidence against permitting genetically engineered food – you are only getting one side of the story. They are trying to convince you to join their network. Continue Site 2 is correct This article presents a balanced view of the genetic engineering controversy. This article is written to inform the reader about the issues discussed at a FDA (Food and Drug Administration) meeting about genetic engineering.

46 The design quality of a website is important for determining whether to trust information on that site and deciding whether you can easily access the information on the site. Next

47 1.Is the site well organized? Is the layout of the information easy to follow? Are the links easy to follow? Is it easy to tell what the website is about? A poorly organized site may lead to confusion during your research. In addition, poor organization may also mean poor information. Next

48 2.Are there spelling & grammatical errors? Are the graphics poor? These types of errors show that the author is careless and sloppy. Therefore, their information probably has not been carefully checked for accuracy or been presented properly. Next

49 3.Do you have to register to use the site? Is there a fee? Be sure you understand the purpose of a site and who the author is, and check with a trusted adult, before you give your personal information online. If there is a fee skip it, there are plenty of free quality resources out there that you can use for your research. Next

50 Look at the following websites Based on HOW the site is put together which site is easier to use? Site 2Site 1 Link for Site 1 Link for Site 2

51 Site 2 is correct The site is well organized. The photos are clear and related to the topic. Descriptions consist of complete sentences, with proper spelling and grammar. Continue

52 Site 1 is incorrect This site asks you to pay to avoid seeing the advertisements. The site is very busy making it difficult to read. The graphics are poor. Some of the descriptions are fragmented (not complete sentences) Continue Site 2 is correct The site is well organized. The photos are clear and related to the topic. Descriptions consist of complete sentences, with proper spelling and grammar.

53 This quiz consists of 6 questions and will help you to check your knowledge on website evaluation. Read each question and choose the correct answer by clicking on it. If you get an answer wrong click on the try again button to return to the question. Start the Quiz

54 1.Finding out WHO you are getting your information from on a website means… a. Who wrote the pages? b. Who wrote the pages and are they an expert on the information they are sharing c. Who stole your socks? d. Who evaluated the website?

55 Answer b is correct. We want to know who the author is and if they are an expert in the subject they are writing about. Question 2

56 Answer a is only partially correct. While it is important to know who wrote the pages we want to know more about them. Try Again

57 You may want to know who took your socks but answer c has nothing to do with website evaluation. Try Again

58 YOU should be the one evaluating the website. You should be looking for another WHO. Try Again

59 2.To decide WHAT we are getting from a website we should ask ourselves… a. What are the authors sources? b. What is the title of the website? c. What is the upload time of the website? d. What am I doing here?

60 Answer a is correct. We want to know where the author got the information so we can check it for accuracy. Dont forget to check if the author is giving you facts or an opinion based on the facts. Question 3

61 While it may be a good idea to know the title of the website you are on, the title does not tell you if the information is accurate. Answer b is incorrect. Try Again

62 The amount of time that it takes a website to load may influence your decision to use a site but it does not tell you WHAT information you are looking at. Answer c is incorrect. Try Again

63 You are here to learn about website evaluation, try the question again see if you can select the correct answer. Answer d is incorrect. Try Again

64 3. When evaluating a website you want to know… a. When is this quiz over? b. When was the site created? c. When was the site last updated? d. When was the site created and/or last updated?

65 Answer d is correct. We want to know when the site was created and/or when it was last updated. Question 4

66 The quiz will be over when you have answered all six questions correctly. Try Again

67 You are on the right track, we want to know when the site was created, but this is only part of the answer. Try Again

68 You are on the right track, we want to know when the site was last updated, but this is only part of the answer. Try Again

69 4. The WHERE of website evaluation means… a. Where was the information created? California? New York? b. Where does the information come from? A government agency? A college student? c. Where am I? d. Where is the server that hosts the website?

70 We can discover where the information on a website comes from by checking the URL or website address. Knowing where the information is coming from helps us determine if it has bias and if we can trust the author. Answer b is correct. Question 5

71 When evaluating a website it really doesnt matter where someone is physically located when they create the site. Answer a is incorrect. Try Again

72 You are here learning about website evaluation. Go back to the question and see if you can determine the correct answer. Try Again

73 It does not matter where the website is hosted As far as deciding whether or not to use the information on a website is concerned Try Again

74 5. The WHY of website evaluation tells us… a. Why do I have to learn this? b. Why should I trust the author? c. Why should I use this information? d. Why was the website created?

75 We want to know why the website was created so that we can decide if the author is trying to sell us a product or an idea. Then we can determine if we can believe what they are saying or if we have to look elsewhere to get all of the facts. Answer d is correct. Question 6

76 You need to learn about website evaluation so that you know that the information you find online is accurate and trustworthy. Answer a is incorrect. Try Again

77 The process of website evaluation will help to determine whether or not to trust the author. Answer b is incorrect. Try Again

78 You should use the information on a website only after you have fully evaluated it. The WHY of website evaluation is only a part of the whole process. Answer c is incorrect. Try Again

79 6. The HOW of website evaluation means… a. How does the author know this information? b. How can I be sure the information is correct? c. How is the website set up and are the spelling and grammar correct? d.How long does it take to evaluate a website?

80 If there are grammar and spelling mistakes or the website is sloppy or difficult to navigate you have to wonder if the author took care in researching the information on the site. Go to Activity

81 The WHO and the WHERE should have answered this question for you. Try Again

82 A checking for accuracy should have been done in the WHAT area of your evaluation. Try Again

83 How long it takes to evaluate a website depends on many factors including How carefully you evaluate the site How easy it is to locate the information you need to determine the WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, WHY, & HOW How much you already know about the author & the information Try Again

84 Watch this video about the dangers of DHMO (3 minutes, 15 second) Continue Start Video

85 Now that you have seen the video lets evaluate the DHMO websiteDHMO Use your worksheet to decide if you should sign the petition to ban DHMO We will discuss the worksheet and website together when you are done. Exit Link to DHMO website Click Here to Print Worksheet

86 Student Resources Vaughan Memorial Library – Credible Sources Count (http://library.acadiau.ca/tutorials/webevaluation/)http://library.acadiau.ca/tutorials/webevaluation/ Quality Information Checklist (http://www.quick.org.uk/menu.htm)http://www.quick.org.uk/menu.htm Noodlequest (http://www.noodletools.com/noodlequest/)http://www.noodletools.com/noodlequest/ Oregon School Library Information System (http://secondary.educator.oslis.org/research/evalinfo/practice)http://secondary.educator.oslis.org/research/evalinfo/practice Teacher Resources Kathy Schrock (http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrockguide/eval.html )http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrockguide/eval.html CARRDSS (http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/Resources/library- itee/ITEE%20first%20year%20workshop/Your%20topic/CARRDSS.ht m)http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/Resources/library- itee/ITEE%20first%20year%20workshop/Your%20topic/CARRDSS.ht m Evaluating Online Resources Notebook (http://people.uis.edu/rschr1/valid.htm)http://people.uis.edu/rschr1/valid.htm Cyberbee (http://www.cyberbee.com/guides.htmlhttp://www.cyberbee.com/guides.html

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