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WELLINGTON COUNTY Auto Extrication. Overview Apparatus Response to MVCs - Know Your Role Apparatus Response to MVCs - Know Your Role Vehicle Stabilization.

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Presentation on theme: "WELLINGTON COUNTY Auto Extrication. Overview Apparatus Response to MVCs - Know Your Role Apparatus Response to MVCs - Know Your Role Vehicle Stabilization."— Presentation transcript:

1 WELLINGTON COUNTY Auto Extrication

2 Overview Apparatus Response to MVCs - Know Your Role Apparatus Response to MVCs - Know Your Role Vehicle Stabilization Vehicle Stabilization Extrication Techniques Extrication Techniques Pneumatic Lifting Bags Pneumatic Lifting Bags Hybrids and Electric Vehicles Hybrids and Electric Vehicles Holmatro Book Holmatro Book

3 Crew Organization A systematic approach to vehicle extrication is the best way to ensure that tasks are performed as quickly yet as effectively as possible. A systematic approach to vehicle extrication is the best way to ensure that tasks are performed as quickly yet as effectively as possible. The only way to effectively perform a systematic rescue is through team work. The only way to effectively perform a systematic rescue is through team work. In order for a team to work in perfect unison they have to know exactly what is expected of them and have confidence in their abilities and skills to perform their specific tasks. In order for a team to work in perfect unison they have to know exactly what is expected of them and have confidence in their abilities and skills to perform their specific tasks. The ideal number of rescuers for a simple single occupant entrapment is approximately 5-6 The ideal number of rescuers for a simple single occupant entrapment is approximately 5-6

4 Actions of First Arriving Rescue to Simple Single Occupant Entrapment Officer of Rescue: Arrival report Arrival report Take command Take command Assign one crew member as medic Assign one crew member as medic Assign crew (except medic) to outer and inner circle checks Assign crew (except medic) to outer and inner circle checks Assign one crew member in charge of cribbing Assign one crew member in charge of cribbing 360° Size up (if possible) 360° Size up (if possible) Think of a Plan A and B Think of a Plan A and B

5 Actions of First Arriving Rescue to Simple Single Occupant Entrapment Crew of Rescue: Outer and inner circle checks – update Captain of all hazards and remove/isolate/protect Outer and inner circle checks – update Captain of all hazards and remove/isolate/protect Medic make verbal patient contact Medic make verbal patient contact Crib the vehicle as per firefighter in charge of cribbing Crib the vehicle as per firefighter in charge of cribbing Listen for Plan A and B from Captain Listen for Plan A and B from Captain Disconnect Battery (Both terminals – Negative first) Disconnect Battery (Both terminals – Negative first) Glass management Glass management Make access for Medic or EMS Make access for Medic or EMS Proceed with Plan A Proceed with Plan A

6 Actions of First Arriving Rescue to Simple Single Occupant Entrapment Driver of Rescue: Use truck as initial blocker to protect crew and scene Use truck as initial blocker to protect crew and scene Chock wheels Chock wheels Set up tool staging area close to vehicle with ALL extrication tools set up and ready to go Set up tool staging area close to vehicle with ALL extrication tools set up and ready to go Set up lighting as required Set up lighting as required Keep tool staging area as well as extrication work circle tidy and organized Keep tool staging area as well as extrication work circle tidy and organized If a firefighter has to go to your truck to get a piece of equipment, youre not doing your job! If a firefighter has to go to your truck to get a piece of equipment, youre not doing your job! Watch for trip hazards Watch for trip hazards STAY OUT OF THE EXTRICATION STAY OUT OF THE EXTRICATION

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8 Actions of First Arriving Rescue to Simple Single Occupant Entrapment Incident Commander (Captain of Rescue) Driver of Rescue Firefighter in Charge of Cribbing Firefighter Firefighter Assigned as Medic

9 Second Pump/Aerial Arrives On Scene Officer of Rescue: Pass command to Officer of second in pump/aerial and assume Rescue Sector Pass command to Officer of second in pump/aerial and assume Rescue Sector Officer of Pump/Aerial: Assume Command Assume Command Crew of Second Pump/Aerial: Charged 38mm (1½) hand line minimum Charged 38mm (1½) hand line minimum Stay out of the extrication unless requested by Rescue Sector Officer Stay out of the extrication unless requested by Rescue Sector Officer Driver of Second Pump/Aerial: Stage truck as scene blocker (protect rescue) Stage truck as scene blocker (protect rescue) Chock wheels Chock wheels Pylons out Pylons out Charge the hose Charge the hose Lighting as required Lighting as required

10 Second Pump/Aerial Arrives On Scene Incident Commander (Officer of Second Pump/Aerial) Rescue Sector (Officer of Rescue) Driver of RescueExtrication CrewMedic Fire Sector Driver of PumpCrew of Pump Tanker

11 Roadways with speeds of 90 km/h or less: When an incident is of a nature that firefighters will be laying hose or otherwise working on the roadway, apparatus should be positioned to provide a safe work zone for the firefighters, until police assume traffic control.

12 Roadways with speeds of 90 km/h or less: Where apparatus will be parked without protection of a Blocker, vehicle traffic cones should be used by apparatus operators to control traffic flow around the parked vehicle, giving enough room for a walkable safety zone around the vehicle.

13 Vehicle Stabilization

14 Primary goal of stabilization is to maximize the area of contact between the vehicle and the ground to prevent any sudden or unexpected movement of the vehicle. Primary goal of stabilization is to maximize the area of contact between the vehicle and the ground to prevent any sudden or unexpected movement of the vehicle. NEVER test the stability of the vehicle as it is found. NEVER test the stability of the vehicle as it is found. Three typical resting positions of a vehicle after collision: Upright Upright On its side On its side Upside down Upside down Other (i.e. piggyback vehicles) Other (i.e. piggyback vehicles)

15 Vehicle on its Wheels Chock Wheels Chock Wheels Minimum 4 point crib Minimum 4 point crib Placed behind front wheel well and in front of rear wheel well on both sides (ideal) Placed behind front wheel well and in front of rear wheel well on both sides (ideal) 6 point crib – vehicle in danger of collapsing 6 point crib – vehicle in danger of collapsing –Installed under the middle of both sides of the vehicle (below B-posts)

16 Vehicle on its Wheels

17 Vehicle on its Side To ensure that the vehicle does not fall over, place wedges under A and C pillars as well as the under side. To ensure that the vehicle does not fall over, place wedges under A and C pillars as well as the under side. Be aware of fall zone Be aware of fall zone Shore the under side with Res-Q-Jacks Shore the under side with Res-Q-Jacks Depending on the situation it may be necessary to use the Jacks to stabilize the roof side of the vehicle. Depending on the situation it may be necessary to use the Jacks to stabilize the roof side of the vehicle.

18 Vehicle on its Side

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23 Vehicle on its Roof Crib the roof rails between the back of the vehicle and the ground Crib the roof rails between the back of the vehicle and the ground Add additional cribbing to the space between the engine compartment and the windshield for additional stability Add additional cribbing to the space between the engine compartment and the windshield for additional stability Wedges under the front of the vehicle to prevent forward movement Wedges under the front of the vehicle to prevent forward movement Necessary to use Res-Q-Jacks if roof supports will be compromised during extrication (i.e. inverted roof flop) Necessary to use Res-Q-Jacks if roof supports will be compromised during extrication (i.e. inverted roof flop)

24 Vehicle on its Roof Wedges

25 Vehicle on its Roof

26 Piggyback Vehicles Goal is to make both vehicles one Goal is to make both vehicles one Stabilize lower vehicle first then stabilize upper vehicle Stabilize lower vehicle first then stabilize upper vehicle If patient is trapped in lower vehicle, ratcheting upper vehicle to lower is sufficient If patient is trapped in lower vehicle, ratcheting upper vehicle to lower is sufficient If patient is trapped in upper vehicle, ratchet vehicles together but use Res-Q-Jacks for added support on the upper vehicle If patient is trapped in upper vehicle, ratchet vehicles together but use Res-Q-Jacks for added support on the upper vehicle

27 Piggyback Vehicles

28 Extrication Techniques

29 Firefighter and patient safety should be foremost in the Officers mind when selecting a Plan A and B Firefighter and patient safety should be foremost in the Officers mind when selecting a Plan A and B Choose the easiest route available Choose the easiest route available Try before you pry Try before you pry Firefighters and Officers need to know the common names of the various extrication techniques and how to perform them to prevent delay during an extrication Firefighters and Officers need to know the common names of the various extrication techniques and how to perform them to prevent delay during an extrication

30 Common Extrication Techniques Door pop Door pop Full side Full side Third door conversion Third door conversion C-post lift C-post lift Roof flap Roof flap Inverted roof flap Inverted roof flap Horseshoe/Trench cut Horseshoe/Trench cut Tunnel Tunnel Dash lift/roll (ram & spreaders) Dash lift/roll (ram & spreaders)

31 Common Extrication Techniques Door Pop: Removal of a single door Removal of a single door Used when patient is critical Used when patient is critical

32 Common Extrication Techniques Full Side: Removal of both front and back doors including B-post Removal of both front and back doors including B-post Full C-spine for front seat passengers Full C-spine for front seat passengers

33 Common Extrication Techniques Third Door Conversion: Creating a wider opening on two-door vehicles Creating a wider opening on two-door vehicles Allows access to rear seat passengers Allows access to rear seat passengers Full C-spine for front seat passengers Full C-spine for front seat passengers

34 Common Extrication Techniques

35 C-Post Lift: Used when side access of vehicle is limited or blocked Used when side access of vehicle is limited or blocked Full C-spine for front seat passengers Full C-spine for front seat passengers Very quick Very quick

36 Common Extrication Techniques

37 Roof Flap:

38 Common Extrication Techniques

39 Inverted Roof Flap: Inverted Roof Flap:

40 Common Extrication Techniques

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42 Horseshoe / Trench cut: Horseshoe / Trench cut:

43 Common Extrication Techniques Tunnel: Access is made through the rear of the vehicle Access is made through the rear of the vehicle Great for vans, SUVs and hatchbacks Great for vans, SUVs and hatchbacks Full C-spine for all patients Full C-spine for all patients

44 Common Extrication Techniques

45 Dash Roll: Helps free leg entrapments Helps free leg entrapments

46 Common Extrication Techniques Dash Lift: Helps free leg entrapments Helps free leg entrapments

47 Pneumatic Lifting Bags

48 Various shapes and sizes Various shapes and sizes High, medium and low pressure High, medium and low pressure

49 Pneumatic Lifting Bags RULES: Plan operation before starting the work Plan operation before starting the work Be familiar with equipment Be familiar with equipment Have an adequate air supply and sufficient cribbing on hand before beginning operations Have an adequate air supply and sufficient cribbing on hand before beginning operations Position bags on or against a solid surface Position bags on or against a solid surface Never inflate bags against sharp objects – use protective mats Never inflate bags against sharp objects – use protective mats Never inflate bags fully unless they are under load (4 bar max when not under load) Never inflate bags fully unless they are under load (4 bar max when not under load) Inflate bags slowly and monitor them continuously for any shifting Inflate bags slowly and monitor them continuously for any shifting

50 Pneumatic Lifting Bags Never work under a load supported only by lifting bags Never work under a load supported only by lifting bags Do not stand in front of pressurized bags Do not stand in front of pressurized bags Shore up the load with enough cribbing to support the load in case of bag failure Shore up the load with enough cribbing to support the load in case of bag failure Interrupt the process frequently to increase cribbing – lift an inch, crib an inch Interrupt the process frequently to increase cribbing – lift an inch, crib an inch Ensure that the top tier is solid when using box cribbing Ensure that the top tier is solid when using box cribbing Avoid exposing bags to materials hotter than 220°F (104°C). Avoid exposing bags to materials hotter than 220°F (104°C). Never stack more than two bags; centre the bags with smaller bag on top and inflate the bottom bag first (½ full), then inflate the top bag fully. Never stack more than two bags; centre the bags with smaller bag on top and inflate the bottom bag first (½ full), then inflate the top bag fully.

51 Pneumatic Lifting Bags Max Lifting Capacity: Small – 20.8 US tons or lbs Small – 20.8 US tons or lbs Large – 34.2 US tons or lbs Large – 34.2 US tons or lbs Question: What is the maximum lifting capacity if we stack the small and large bags? Answer: 20.8 US tons Question: What is the maximum lifting capacity if we place the two bags side by side and inflate simultaneously? Answer: 55 US tons

52 Pneumatic Lifting Bags Stacked bags can only lift the capacity of the lowest rated bag The lifting capacity can be increased by placing two bags side by side and inflating simultaneously

53 Hybrids and 100% Electric Vehicles

54 Response for Electric Vehicles 1. Identify that the vehicle is equipped with hybrid technology or is 100% electric 2. Stabilize vehicle 3. Take reasonable steps to de-energize the high voltage system and SRS 4. Identify the location of High Voltage components prior to extrication

55 Identification of Hybrid Vehicles

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58 Identification of Electric Vehicles

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60 2011 Nissan Leaf

61 Identification of Electric Vehicles

62 2011 Chevrolet Volt

63 Stabilization The greatest hazard when dealing with electric vehicles is the transmission is in Drive with no signs of the vehicle being powered up The greatest hazard when dealing with electric vehicles is the transmission is in Drive with no signs of the vehicle being powered up Chock the tires of suspected electric vehicles before making access Chock the tires of suspected electric vehicles before making access Do not crib vehicle under the Li-ion battery (Volt, Leaf) Do not crib vehicle under the Li-ion battery (Volt, Leaf) Do not place pneumatic lifting bags under high voltage components Do not place pneumatic lifting bags under high voltage components

64 De-energizing High Voltage Systems There are a couple ways to de-energize the high voltage systems Primary Method: Turn OFF the vehicle Turn OFF the vehicle Remove contacts to the 12V service battery Remove contacts to the 12V service battery

65 De-energizing High Voltage Systems Alternative Method: Remove High-Voltage Service Disconnect Plug Remove High-Voltage Service Disconnect Plug

66 Removing High Voltage Service Disconnect Plug The service disconnect plug provides a means to disconnect the high-voltage battery for safely servicing vehicle The service disconnect plug provides a means to disconnect the high-voltage battery for safely servicing vehicle The individual cells inside battery pack will still be charged The individual cells inside battery pack will still be charged Do not cut into high-voltage battery case or penetrate batteries at any time Do not cut into high-voltage battery case or penetrate batteries at any time

67 Removing High Voltage Service Disconnect Plug

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70 Additional Built-in Safety Systems Inertia Switch – Fuel Pump Shut-off In the event of a collision or a substantial physical jolt, the switch is designed to open automatically, shutting off electrical power to the fuel pump and the high- voltage shut-off switch.

71 Additional Built-in Safety Systems Inertia Switch – High Voltage Cut-off In the event of a collision or a substantial physical jolt, the switch is designed to open automatically, disabling the high- voltage system.

72 Additional Built-in Safety Systems High-Voltage Fuse In the event of a high-current short circuit, the high-voltage fuse will open, disabling the high-voltage system.

73 Additional Built-in Safety Systems High-Voltage Interlock Circuit Whenever a high-voltage connector is disconnected, the high-voltage interlock circuit opens and disables the high-voltage system.

74 Additional Built-in Safety Systems Thermal Sensors In the event the ignition key is left in the ON position, while the vehicle is parked and the high-voltage battery temperature exceeds 60°C (140°F), thermal sensors located inside the high-voltage battery will automatically disconnect the high-voltage battery.

75 SRS are powered by the 12V service battery only! De-energizing the high voltage system alone will NOT de-energize the SRS ALWAYS attempt to disconnect the 12V service battery prior to extrication on ANY vehicle

76 Turning OFF the Vehicle Some vehicle have a smart key that does not go into the dash, the driver may carry it on their person or in a briefcase Some vehicle have a smart key that does not go into the dash, the driver may carry it on their person or in a briefcase The key only has to be within a certain distance from the dash to activate and deactivate the ignition system The key only has to be within a certain distance from the dash to activate and deactivate the ignition system There may be just a button on the dash area that you have to push to turn the ignition off There may be just a button on the dash area that you have to push to turn the ignition off

77 12V Service Battery Locations In hybrids, most 12V batteries are located under the hood Chevrolet Volt – left side trunk Chevrolet Volt – left side trunk VW Touareg – under driver seat VW Touareg – under driver seat Smart – front passenger foot well Smart – front passenger foot well

78 Identifying High Voltage Components Before Extrication Rescue Sector Officers should reference the Holmatro Guide and any other resources available (i.e. owners manuals) before extrication Rescue Sector Officers should reference the Holmatro Guide and any other resources available (i.e. owners manuals) before extrication Everyone involved in the extrication should be aware of the location of all High Voltage components (Orange) Everyone involved in the extrication should be aware of the location of all High Voltage components (Orange)

79 Holmatro Rescue Guide to Vehicle Safety Systems

80 Holmatro Guide Book A guide containing information on a variety of automotive safety equipment and associated components A guide containing information on a variety of automotive safety equipment and associated components One book on each Rescue One book on each Rescue Same information on all the computers Same information on all the computers Identify the make, model and year of the vehicle Identify the make, model and year of the vehicle Then look it up in the book or on the computer Then look it up in the book or on the computer If you dont know the year of the vehicle, use the 10 th digit rule If you dont know the year of the vehicle, use the 10 th digit rule

81 10 th Digit Rule Since 1981 every VIN contains 17 characters Since 1981 every VIN contains 17 characters Tenth character always identifies vehicles model year Tenth character always identifies vehicles model year Identify the 10 th character of the VIN and then look it up in the quick reference chart (page 1-5) Identify the 10 th character of the VIN and then look it up in the quick reference chart (page 1-5)

82 10 th Digit Rule A – 1980L – 1990Y B – 1981M – C – 1982N – D – 1983P – E – 1984R – F – 1985S – G – 1986T – H – 1987V J – 1988W – 2008 K – 1989X

83 10 th Digit Rule A – 2010L – 2020Y B – 2011M – C – 2012N – D – 2013P – E – 2014R – F – 2015S – G – 2016T – H – 2017V J – 2018W – 2038 K – 2019X

84 10 th Digit Rule 2010 and 1980 both use the letter A 2010 and 1980 both use the letter A If you cant tell the difference between a 2010 model year and a 1980 model year, look at the 7 th digit of the VIN If you cant tell the difference between a 2010 model year and a 1980 model year, look at the 7 th digit of the VIN If the 7 th digit is a number, it is a model between If the 7 th digit is a number, it is a model between If the 7 th digit is a letter, it is a model between If the 7 th digit is a letter, it is a model between

85 Holmatro Guide Book Identifies location of: Airbags Airbags Pretensioners Pretensioners Batteries Batteries Impact sensors Impact sensors Gas struts Gas struts Rollover protection systems Rollover protection systems Also identifies manufacturers stated drain down time for capacitors


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