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SUPPORTING STUDENTS TO PRODUCE QUALITY WORK NAF Institute for Professional Development July 2008 Orlando, FL FACILITATED BY Theron Cosgrave Swanson & Cosgrave.

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Presentation on theme: "SUPPORTING STUDENTS TO PRODUCE QUALITY WORK NAF Institute for Professional Development July 2008 Orlando, FL FACILITATED BY Theron Cosgrave Swanson & Cosgrave."— Presentation transcript:

1 SUPPORTING STUDENTS TO PRODUCE QUALITY WORK NAF Institute for Professional Development July 2008 Orlando, FL FACILITATED BY Theron Cosgrave Swanson & Cosgrave Consulting www.swansonandcosgrave.com

2 OBJECTIVES Consider what quality means and how we know what quality student work looks like Understand instructional strategies that help motivate students to produce quality work Learn about strategies, approaches, and tools that teachers can use to help students improve work quality

3 WHAT IS QUALITY? How do YOU know what quality work is? How do STUDENTS know what quality work is? What would it look and feel like in your classroom if students were CONSISTENTLY doing high-quality work?

4 STARTING WITH OURSELVES Teachers who are expectingand gettingsuccess with ALL students have a deep belief in and consistently act as if ALL STUDENTS CAN LEARN AND ITS THEIR JOB TO SEE THAT THEY DO.

5 QUALITY TAKES COMMITMENT Addressing the incredible gravitational pull of school as usual. Understanding learner perspectives (Why reluctant learners feel the way they do.) Understanding learner behaviors (Why reluctant learners act the way they do.) Believe you have the power and responsibility to reach and teach reluctant learners!

6 WORKING ON OUR PRACTICE Focus on specific, targeted student learning outcomes Collaboration (teachers working together, professional learning communities) Regular writing across the disciplines (non-fiction) Frequent formative assessment & feedback (daily/weekly)

7 A FOCUS ON LEARNERS AND LEARNING Learning, in the end, is about LEARNER attempts to learn, more than about teacher attempts to teach. Co-create a classroom culture where both teachers and students believe in the capacity of all to learn, succeed, & work together to reach targeted learning goals.

8 TWO TYPES OF STUDENTS vs. Reluctant (wont) Struggling (cant)

9 SUPPORTING THE RELUCTANTS (WONTs) NOT INTERESTEDLIFE ISSUES ENGAGING CURRICULUM, STUDENT VOICE & OWNERSHIP SLCs, ADVISORIES, SUPPORT SERVICES, CULTURE OF CARING RESPONSE REASON INTERVENTION Reluctant

10 WHAT OUR STUDENTS NEED Four Foundational Mindsets: I am Capable - How the learner perceives her/himself. (Am I capable of doing this? If I feel capable, I act capable.) Today Connects with Tomorrow/ Future - Empowerment to Find Motivations (How will efforts I am investing today connect with desired outcomes tomorrow/ in my future?)

11 WHAT OUR STUDENTS NEED I Make a Difference - Empowerment for being a respected participant (team member/ student) (Do I have a say? Can I impact potential outcomes? Do you respect and believe in me?) Someone Believe in Me - Pays Attention to My Progress and Growth (If I struggle or even fail, will it matter to anyone else? Is it safe to try? Will your expectations stay high? Will you continue to believe I can do this?)

12 THREE CONSTRUCTS REQUIRED BY LEARNERS Social Supports - Emotional support, guidance, and recognition through caring relationships Intrinsic Motivation - Internal desire to attain goals, enhanced through voice, that influences the journey along the way -- building persistence & commitment Self-Efficacy - Ones belief in ones ability to accomplish things -- a level of confidence -- attributing success &/or failure to EFFORT rather than ABILITY.

13 SUPPORTING STUDENTS TO PRODUCE QUALITY WORK How can we motivate students to produce quality work? Increase student voice & choice Employ an engaging curriculum where students do the work of learning & thinking Turn your classroom into a high performance learning community

14 ENGAGING INSTRUCTION: THE THREE Rs RIGOR = challenge students! RELEVANCE = answer the so what? question with authentic assignments RELATIONSHIPS = take advantage of SLC structure to create caring, high performance environments with high expectations & high support

15 NAFs new curriculum Six As Daggetts Rigor & Relevance Framework Marzanos Essential 9 ENGAGING INSTRUCTION: USE THE TOOLS!

16 Six As of Quality Projects AUTHENTICITY ACADEMIC RIGOR APPLIED LEARNING ACTIVE EXPLORATION ADULT RELATIONSHIPS ASSESSMENT PRACTICES

17 ENGAGING INSTRUCTION: USE THE TOOLS!

18 ENGAGING INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES Five observable classroom strategies… 1.Facilitation of student conversation 2.Teacher-led instruction 3.Seatwork/centers w/ teacher engaged 4.Seatwork/centers w/ teacher disengaged 5.Total disengagement

19 Marzanos Essential 9 1. Identifying Similarities and Differences 2. Nonlinguistic Representations 3. Summarizing & Note Taking 4. Advance Organizers 5. Cooperative Learning 6. Setting Objectives & Providing Feedback 7. Generating and Testing Hypotheses 8. Homework and Practice 9. Reinforcing Effort & Providing Recognition ENGAGING INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES

20 1. Identifying Similarities and Differences Venn diagrams Metaphors and analogies How are stocks like lottery tickets? T-charts Stocks Bonds Marzanos Essential 9

21 2. Nonlinguistic Representations Marzanos Essential 9

22 Authentic work = Teachers coach students to learn how to learn. Students know why they are doing the work and what quality looks like. 3. Summarizing & Note Taking Marzanos Essential 9

23 4. Advance Organizers Pre-view concepts, texts, etc. Highlight text structures, categories, etc. Prime the pump - connect & personalize info Ex: Fill-in-the-______ note sheets Marzanos Essential 9

24 5. Cooperative Learning Pairs, trios, groups (foster student conversation) Provide structure of roles, task specifics Allow for individual & collective responsibility Marzanos Essential 9

25 6. Setting Objectives & Providing Feedback Objectives In this unit, I want to learn… Feedback Guidance, direction, suggestions for improvement – can be given by peers, teachers, other adults, etc. Use exemplars and rubrics! Marzanos Essential 9

26 7. Generating and Testing Hypotheses Ask students to… Predict what would happen if… Think what would be different if… Apply what they know to a new and different context Marzanos Essential 9

27 8. Homework and Practice Explain purpose of HW – prep or practice Vary HW delivery methods/formats Provide feedback on all HW Track speed and accuracy during practice Marzanos Essential 9

28 9. Reinforcing Effort & Providing Recognition Students can change beliefs about their effort and performance – be explicit about effort and progress Pause, Prompt, Praise Marzanos Essential 9

29 How can students own their learning? Negotiated curriculum Project design teams Topic options w/in boundaries Product/performance options Solve classroom problems with students Student Voice & Ownership

30 SUPPORTING THE RELUCTANTS ( WONTs) NOT INTERESTEDLIFE ISSUES ENGAGING CURRICULUM, STUDENT VOICE & OWNERSHIP SLCs, ADVISORIES, SUPPORT SERVICES, CULTURE OF CARING RESPONSE REASON INTERVENTION Reluctant

31 SUPPORTING THE STRUGGLING (CANT S ) MAY NOT YET HAVE NEEDED SKILLS MAY NOT KNOW WHAT QUALITY IS PROVIDE SKILL TRAINING, FEEDBACK, & SCAFFOLDING USE EXAMPLES, EXPERTS, & RUBRICS RESPONSE REASON INTERVENTION Struggling

32 HELPING STUDENTS TO RECOGNIZE QUALITY 1) USE MODELS & EXEMPLARS Deconstruct exemplars w/ inductive lesson 2) BRING IN EXPERTS Show & discuss professional standards 3) USE RUBRICS (including student- designed rubrics)

33 HELPING STUDENTS RECOGNIZE QUALITY We need to involve students by making the targets clear to them and having them help design assessments that reflect those targets. Then we involve them again in the process of keeping track over time of their learning so they can watch themselves improving. Thats where motivation comes from. - Rick Stiggins

34 USING MODELS & EXEMPLARS When my class begins a new project,a new venture, we begin with a taste of excellence. I pull out models of work by former students, videotapes of former students presenting their work, models of work from other schools, and models of work from the professional world. We sit and admire. We critique and discuss what makes them powerful: what makes a piece of creative writing compelling and exciting, what makes a scientific or historical research project significant and stirring, what makes a novel mathematical solution so breath- taking.

35 USING MODELS & EXEMPLARS Ive been criticized at times by educators for using models so much. All of the work will be copies, they say…But I dont mind at all. In fact, I encourage imitation as a place to begin. As a student, I learned to write by copying the styles of great authors; I learned to paint by copying the styles of great painters…. I encourage this practice so regularly that I explicitly describe and present what I call tribute work. Tribute work is the work of a student who built off of, borrowed ideas from, or imitated the work of a particular former or current student.

36 USING MODELS & EXEMPLARS Deconstructing Professional Work What makes the work good? What features do you notice? How might work have been created?

37 BRING IN EXPERTS Ideas for Connecting with Experts Guest speakers Students interview experts outside of class Phone interviews E-mail interviews

38 USE RUBRICS RUBRICS 101: What is a Rubric? A = 90-100 B = 80-89 C = 70-79

39 RUBRICS 101 A rubric is not a grading system. It is a lesson in what constitutes quality. It is a declaration of expectations and a means of self- assessment for the student. -- Heidi Hayes Jacobs, Ed.D., in Redefining Assessment

40 What do these levels of performance look like?

41

42 4 levels left side student check box right side teacher check box scoring line allows for weighting of elements

43 RUBRIC TIPS Build rubrics with students Show work samples along with rubrics Criteria: Less is more! Indicators: Describe what it looks like Levels: Use an even number Have students self-assess w/ rubrics

44 http://rubistar.4teachers.org

45 MAY NOT YET HAVE NEEDED SKILLS MAY NOT KNOW WHAT QUALITY IS PROVIDE SKILL TRAINING, FEEDBACK, & SCAFFOLDING USE EXAMPLES, EXPERTS, & RUBRICS RESPONSE REASON INTERVENTION Struggling SUPPORTING THE STRUGGLING (CANT S )

46 SKILL TRAINING 1) IDENTIFY AND TEACH SKILLS Avoid assumptions about student skills 2) PROVIDE FEEDBACK Formative assessment is critical 3) SCAFFOLD FOR SUCCESS Provide multiple types of support

47 A CLOSER LOOK AT SKILLS THE TASK: Gavin, go brush your teeth.

48 BRUSHING YOUR TEETH Locate and go to bathroom Locate light switch, turn on light Locate stool, place in front of sink, stand on stool without falling Open medicine cabinet (no handles!) Identify personal brushing equipment (toothbrush, toothpaste) Remove equipment from cabinet, balance on sink edge

49 Remove brush from case; open toothpaste tube Squeeze right amount of paste onto brush (without spilling) Replace toothpaste cap Thoroughly brush all tooth surfaces with proper motion Keep excess paste in mouth w/out swallowing Spit excess paste into sink Turn on faucet (cold water side) Rinse off toothbrush BRUSHING YOUR TEETH, CONTINUED…

50 Locate cup Fill cup half full with water, turn faucet off Rinse mouth w/out swallowing; spit in sink Wipe mouth with correct towel Return brush to medicine cabinet Turn off light on way out!

51 Remove brush from case; open toothpaste tube Squeeze right amount of paste onto brush (without spilling) Replace toothpaste cap Thoroughly brush all tooth surfaces with proper motion Keep excess paste in mouth w/out swallowing Spit excess paste into sink Turn on faucet (cold water side) Rinse off toothbrush BRUSHING YOUR TEETH, CONTINUED…

52 PREREQUISITE COMPONENT SKILLS (PCSs) = Individual Skills Needed to Complete a Complex Task Skilled teachers naturally identify and teach to PCSs Classroom instruction must be aligned to PCSs to ensure success

53 PCSs: THE BOTTOM LINE If students need to do it, you need to teach it.

54 PBL ASSIGNMENT HEALTH PROJECT Required Elements: Develop family medical histories Write proposal to study health issue of personal or community interest Keep research log, including citations Produce a newsletter Develop lesson plans and materials for underserved population Present to real audience PCSs???

55 NEWSLETTER PCSs Research Topic Write Articles Edit Articles Design Layout Produce Layout Type Articles Take Photos Digitize Photos Print & Copy Newsletter Distribute Newsletter PCSs???

56 NEWSLETTER LAYOUT PCSs Designing a Newspaper Layout Columns Font Sizes Font Styles FormattingHeadlines Headers/Footers Icons/Images White Space

57 BALANCED FEEDBACK COLLECT EVIDENCE AT VARIOUS STAGES OF THE WORK USE A VARIETY OF METHODS: Tests Product assessments Performance assessments Self-Reports

58 BALANCED FEEDBACK: ASSESSMENT vs. EVALUATION ASSESSMENT Latin root assidere = to sit beside Formative Along the way Guiding EVALUATION Latin/Old French valere= to value Summative At the end Judgment

59 PROVIDING FEEDBACK (For learning purposes)… a test at the end of a unit….is pointless; its too late to work with the results… The feedback on tests, seatwork, and homework should give each pupil guidance on how to improve, and each pupil must be given help and an opportunity to work on the improvement. - Black and William

60 PROVIDING FEEDBACK: ASSESSING FOR LEARNING When they assess FOR learning, teachers use the classroom assessment process and the continuous flow of information about student achievement that it provides in order to advance, not merely check on, student learning. They do this by continuously adjusting instruction based on the results of classroom assessments. - Stiggins

61 SCAFFOLDING FOR SUCCESS SCAFFOLDING FOR SUCCESS ContentAcademic foundation for work TrainingExplicit skill-building in all required production areas ExpertiseProfessional-level training and consultation provided by experts OversightStructured times for teachers to meet, motivate, and mentor students

62 SCAFFOLDING FOR SUCCESS DocumentsDescriptors, calendars, rubrics to explain and organize work ToolsTechnological resources needed for production TimeIn-class opportunities to meet, research, produce, exhibit, and evaluate

63 In Review… SUPPORTING THE RELUCTANTS NOT INTERESTEDLIFE ISSUES ENGAGING CURRICULUM, STUDENT VOICE & OWNERSHIP SLCs, ADVISORIES, SUPPORT SERVICES, CULTURE OF CARING RESPONSE REASON INTERVENTION Reluctant

64 In Review… SUPPORTING THE STRUGGLING MAY NOT YET HAVE NEEDED SKILLS MAY NOT KNOW WHAT QUALITY IS PROVIDE SKILL TRAINING, FEEDBACK, & SCAFFOLDING USE EXAMPLES, EXPERTS, & RUBRICS RESPONSE REASON INTERVENTION Struggling

65 THE RESULT: vs. WONT CANT ENGAGED STUDENTS WHO CAN & WILL!


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