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Web site hyperlinks Weather ADDS - Aviation Digital Data Service HomepageADDS - Aviation Digital Data Service Homepage FAA tests (FAA web) Pilot TestingPilot.

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Presentation on theme: "Web site hyperlinks Weather ADDS - Aviation Digital Data Service HomepageADDS - Aviation Digital Data Service Homepage FAA tests (FAA web) Pilot TestingPilot."— Presentation transcript:

1 Web site hyperlinks Weather ADDS - Aviation Digital Data Service HomepageADDS - Aviation Digital Data Service Homepage FAA tests (FAA web) Pilot TestingPilot Testing FAA web site (General info) FAA Home PageFAA Home Page IACRA FAAST and WINGS Gleim Aviation Home Page National Association of Flight Instructors EAA AOPA Link to your FSDO FAA-Field OfficesFAA-Field Offices CFI Toolbox CFI Toolbox Test Center Web site addresses may occasionally change. If they do its link on this cd may not connect. To correct the issue contact CFI Toolbox at and we will assist you in correcting the

2 One of the main functions of flaps during approach and landing is to increase wing lift and drag which allows an increase in angle of descent without increasing airspeed Chapter 1 airplanes and aerodynamics Flaps and rudder FAA 8083-H-25 Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc.

3 Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc. FAA 8083-H-25 The rudder is used to control yaw about the vertical axis Rudder and the three axes

4 FAA 8083-H-25 Rudder and the three axes

5 The four aerodynamic forces acting on an airplane in flight are LIFT - WEIGHT - THRUST - DRAG In unaccelerated flight, Lift = Weight and Thrust = Drag FAA 8083-H-25

6 Bernoullis Principle Bernoullis Principle states in part that the internal pressure of a fluid (liquid or gas) decreases at the points where the speed of the fluid increases. a. This principle is applicable to an airplane wing because it is designed and constructed with a curve or camber. When air flows along the upper wing surface, it travels a greater distance in the same period of time (ie., faster) than the airflow along the lower wing surface. b. Therefore, the pressure above the wing is less than it is below the wing. This generates a lift force over the upper curved surface of the wing. FAA-H Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc.

7 FAA-H

8 Stalls and spins An airplane can be stalled at any airspeed and in any flight attitude. A stall results when the critical angle of attack is exceeded and the smooth airflow over the airplanes wing is disrupted. The critical angle of attack at which an airplane stalls will be the same regardless of airspeed, weight, or configuration. An airplane in a given configuration will stall at the same indicated airspeed regardless of altitude because the airspeed indicator is directly related to air density An airplane spins when one wing is more stalled than the other. To enter a spin an airplane must be stalled first. Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc. FAA-H A

9 Frost Frost forms when the temp of the collecting surface is at or below the dewpoint of the adjacent air, and the dewpoint is below freezing. The water vapor sublimates directly as ice crystals on the wing surface. Frost disrupts the smooth airflow and causes early airflow separation. Frost also causes increased drag and decreased lift. Frost may make it difficult to take off and should be completely removed prior to take off. Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc. AC 00-6A

10 Ground effect Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc. FAA-H Ground effect is the result of the interface of the ground (or water) surface with the airflow patterns about the airplane. 2. The vertical component of the airflow around the wing is restricted, which alters the wings upwash, downwash, and wingtip vortices. 3.The reduction of the wingtip vortices alters the spanwise lift distribution and reduces the induced angle of attack and induced drag. a. Thus the wing will require a lower angle of attack in ground effect to produce the same lift coefficient, or, if a constant angle of attack is maintained, an increase in the lift coefficient will result.

11 4. An airplane is affected by ground effect when it is within the length of the airplanes wingspan above the ground. The ground effect is most often recognized when the airplane is less one-half the wingspans length above the ground. 5. Ground effect may cause an airplane to float on landings or permit it to become airborne with insufficient airspeed to stay in flight above the area of ground effect. a. An airplane may settle back to the surface abruptly after flying through ground effect if the pilot has not attained recommended takeoff speed. Ground effect

12 Airplane turn The horizontal component of lift makes an airplane turn. This horizontal component is attained thru the coordinated use of aileron, rudder, and elevator. The rudder causes yaw but does not cause the airplane to turn FAA-H Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc.

13 Link to Stability, WT & Bal & Performance Aircraft Stability FAA-H An inherently stable airplane returns to its original condition (Position or attitude) after being disturbed. It requires less effort to control. 2.The location of the center of gravity (CG) with respect to the center of lift ( or center of pressure) determines the longitudinal stability of an airplane. a. Changes in the center of pressure in a wing affects the aircrafts aerodynamic balance and control. 3. Airplanes (except a T-tail) normally pitch down when power is reduced ( and the controls are not adjusted) because the downwash on the elevators from the propeller slipstream is reduced and elevator effectiveness is reduced. This allows the nose to drop. Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc.

14 4. When the CG in an airplane is located at or rear of the aft CG limit, the airplane a. Develops an inability to recover from stall conditions and b. Becomes less stable at all airspeeds. Aircraft Stability

15 Left turning tendencies FAA-H TORQUE AND P-FACTOR 1.The torque effect (left-turning tendency) is greatest at low airspeed, high angles of attack, and high power, e.g., on takeoff. Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc. Torque effect Effect of slipstream

16 2. P-factor (asymmetric propeller loading) causes the airplane to yaw to the left when at high angles of attack because the descending right side of the propeller (as seen from the rear) has a higher angle of attack (than the upward- moving blade on the left side) and provides more thrust. P-Factor Gyroscopic Precession

17 Load factors FAA-CT E FAA-H Load factor refers to the additional weight carried by the wings due to the airplanes weight plus the centrifugal force. a. The amount of excess load that can be imposed on an airplanes wings varies directly with the airplanes speed and the excess lift available. 1) At low speeds, very little excess lift is available, so very little excess load can be imposed. 2) At high speeds, the wings lifting capacity is so great that the load factor can quickly exceed safety limits. b. An increased load factor will result in an airplane stalling at a higher airspeed. c. As bank angle increased, the load factor increases. The wings have to carry not only the airplanes weight but the centrifugal force as well. Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc. Aerodynamics Library

18 Load factors Aerodynamics Library Reproduced with permission of Gleim Publications, All rights reserved Copyright © 2009 Gleim Publications, Inc. and/or Gleim Internet, Inc. FAA-H On the exam, a load factor chart is given with the amount of bank on the horizontal axis (along the bottom of the graph), and the load factor on the vertical axis ( up the left side of the graph). Additionally, a table which provides the load factor corresponding to specific bank angles is found on the left side of the chart. Use this table to answer load factor questions. a. Compute the load factor by multiplying the airplanes load factor which corresponds to the given angle of bank. For example, the wings of a 2,000-lb. airplane in a 60 bank must support 4,000 lb. (2,000 lb. x 2.000). b. Example load factor chart: FAA-H FAA-CT E

19 Study the unit one outline and answer all unit one test questions in your Gleim study guide. Repeat the process until at least 90% of all questions can be answered correctly. Then take the class test on chapter one. Read the outline for unit two and prepare for the unit two presentation. While reading the outline be sure to note any questions concerning unit two. Link to chap 2 1.Load factor (or G units) is a multiple of the regular weight or, alternatively, a multiple of the force of gravity. a. Straight-and-level flight has a load factor at 1.0. (Verify on the chart above.) b. A 60 level bank has a load factor of 2.0. Due to centrifugal force, the wings must hold up twice the amount of weight. c. A 50 level bank has a load factor of about 1.5.


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