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Digital differences New data and trends Kathryn Zickuhr, Research Specialist Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project American Library Association.

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Presentation on theme: "Digital differences New data and trends Kathryn Zickuhr, Research Specialist Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project American Library Association."— Presentation transcript:

1 Digital differences New data and trends Kathryn Zickuhr, Research Specialist Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project American Library Association Spectrum Leadership Institute Anaheim, CA - June 25, 2012

2 Kathryn Zickuhr Research Specialist Pew Internet & American @pewresearch

3 About Pew Internet Part of the Pew Research Center, a non-partisan fact tank in Washington, DC Studies how people use digital technologies Does not promote specific technologies or make policy recommendations Data for this talk is from nationally representative telephone surveys of U.S. adults and teens (on landlines and cell phones) All slides and reports are available at pewinternet.org

4 PewResearchCenter Public opinion attitudes toward the press, politics and public policy issues (people-press.org) The performance of the U.S. press (journalism.org) The impact of technology (pewinternet.org) Worldwide public opinion (pewglobal.org) Religion and public life (pewforum.org) The U.S. Hispanic population (pewhispanic.org) Social and demographic trends (pewsocialtrends.org) More: pewresearch.org

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6 Factors Age group Race/ethnicity Household income Educational attainment Quality of access

7 Internet

8 % of adults ages 18+ who go online Internet use over time ( ) 14% (June 1995) 82% (April 2012) Source: Pew Internet surveys

9 % of adults ages 18+ who go online at home via dial-up or broadband Almost two-thirds of adults have home broadband Source: Pew Internet surveys

10 Internet use vs home broadband by age % of all adults 18+ Source: Pew Internet April pewinternet.org

11 % of all adults 18+ Source: Pew Internet April 2012 survey. Internet use vs home broadband pewinternet.org

12 Internet use vs home broadband by yearly household income % of all adults 18+ Source: Pew Internet April pewinternet.org

13 % of all adults 18+ Source: Pew Internet April 2012 survey. Internet use vs home broadband by

14 pewinternet.org What is the MAIN reason you do not use the internet? (asked of non-users) Source: Pew Internet May 2010 survey.

15 Gadgets

16 Source: Pew Internet surveys. Data is for adults age 18+. pewinternet.org Adult gadget ownership,

17 Gadget ownership by age group Source: Pew Internet surveys. Data is for adults age 18+. pewinternet.org

18 Amost nine in ten adults (and three- quarters of teens) have a cell phone Teen data: July 2011 Adult data: Feb 2012 Source: Pew Internet surveys. pewinternet.org

19 Cell phones by age group Teen data: July 2011 Adult data: Feb 2012 Source: Pew Internet surveys. pewinternet.org

20 Gadgets by household income Source: Pew Internet surveys. Data is for adults age 18+. pewinternet.org

21 Gadget ownership by education Source: Pew Internet surveys. Data is for adults age 18+. pewinternet.org

22 Gadget ownership by race/ethnicity Source: Pew Internet surveys. Data is for adults age 18+. * English- and Spanish-speaking

23 % of all adults 18+ Source: Pew Internet February 2012 survey. Cell phone ownership (total) by race/ethnicity

24 % of adult cell phone owners 18+ within each group who do the following activities with their cell phone White, non- Hispanic Black, non- Hispanic Hispanic (n=196) Send or receive text messages707683* Take a picture717079* Access the internet3956*51* Send a photo or video to someone525861* Send or receive 3446*43* Download an app2836* Play a game3143*40* Play music2745*47* Record a video3041*42* Access a social networking site2539*35* Watch a video2133*39* Post a photo or video online1830*28* Check bank balance or do online banking1527*25* *indicates statistically significant differences compared with whites. Source: Pew Internet May 2011 survey Cell phone activities by race/ethnicity

25 About half of adults (and almost a quarter of teens) have a smartphone Teen data: July 2011 Adult data: Feb 2012 Source: Pew Internet surveys. pewinternet.org

26 Smartphones by age group Teen data: July 2011 Adult data: Feb 2012 Source: Pew Internet surveys. pewinternet.org

27 Smartphone ownership by age and income/education % of adults within each group who own a smartphone (n=336) (n=601) (n=639) 65+ (n=626) All adults 66% 59% 34% 13% Household Income Less than $30,000/yr $30,000 or more/yr Educational Attainment High school grad or less Some college or college grad Adult data:

28 % of all adults 18+ Source: Pew Internet February 2012 survey. Cell phone ownership (total) by race/ethnicity

29 % of all adults 18+ Source: Pew Internet February 2012 survey. Smartphone ownership by race/ ethnicity

30 25% of smartphone owners say they mostly go online with their smartphone. About one third of them do not have a traditional high-speed broadband connection at home. Groups that are more likely to say their phone is their main source of internet access: Young adults Minorities Those with no college experience Those in lower-income households

31 % of internet users ages 18+ Source: Pew Internet February 2012 survey. Twitter use by race/ethnicity * English- and Spanish-speaking

32

33 Libraries of today and tomorrow

34 About our libraries research Goal: To study the changing role of public libraries and library users in the digital age Funded by a three-year, $1.4 million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation libraries.pewinternet.org

35 RESEARCH TIMELINE Stage I (August 2011-July 2012) Libraries + new technologies The rise of e-reading (April 2012) E-books, patrons, and libraries – JUST PUBLISHED – Includes quotes from librarians and patrons – Available online at libraries.pewinternet.org Library use in different community types (summer) The habits of younger library users (summer)

36 The rise of e-reading

37 Report: The rise of e-reading Note: Due to multiple responses, categories do not add up to 100% One in five adults has read an e-book in the past year

38 Book reading by age group % of each age group who have read a book (in any format) in whole or in part in the past 12 months Source: Pew Internet December 2011 survey.libraries.pewinternet.org

39 The book format used by readers on any given day is changing % of adult book readers (age 18+) using this format on an average day, as of June 2010 and December 2011 Source: Pew Internet December 2011 survey.libraries.pewinternet.org

40 Who reads e-books? E-book readers are more likely than other readers to be: Under age 50 College educated Living in households earning $50K+ Other key characteristics: They read more books, more often More likely to buy their books than borrow Source: Pew Internet December 2011 survey.libraries.pewinternet.org

41 How e-readers read their e-books % of all Americans age 16 and older who read an e-book in the past 12 months, as of December 2011 Source: Pew Internet December 2011 survey.libraries.pewinternet.org

42 Who owns tablets and e-readers? 29% of US adults own a specialized e-reading device (either a tablet or an e-reader) 19% of adults own an e-reader 19% of adults own a tablet computer

43 Who owns tablets and e-readers? E-reader and tablet ownership are strongly correlated with income & education, as well as age both devices are most popular with adults under 50. Women are more likely than men to own e-readers Parents are more likely than non-parents to own tablets

44 * = among people who own that device How device owners read their e-books % of owners of each device who read e-books on that devicewho read an e-book in the past 12 months, as of December 2011

45 Which is better for these purposes, a printed book or an e-book? Among people ages 16+ who read both an e-book & a print book in the past year

46 My Kindle fits in my purse, so I can carry my Kindle places I wouldnt carry a book. I find myself taking it almost everywhere I go so if I find myself with a free couple of minutes, I can read a couple of pages. – E-book borrower

47 E-books at libraries

48 How people used the library in the past year The % of Americans ages 16+ who used the library for the following purposes in the past year

49 12% of e-book readers borrow e-books from the library Source: Pew Internet December 2011 survey.libraries.pewinternet.org

50 When you want to read a particular e-book, where do you look first? Among all people ages 16+ who read an e-book in the past year

51 When you want to read a particular e-book, where do you look first? Among people who borrowed an e-book from the library in the past year n=111

52 Have you ever wanted to borrow a particular e-book from the library and found that... Among e-book borrowers Source: Pew Internet December 2011 survey.libraries.pewinternet.org

53 Fast, easy, plentiful. – E-book-borrowing patron

54 62% of all Americans ages 16 and older, including 58% of library card holders, say they do not know if their library lends e-books.

55 Reason % of e-book readers who do not get e-books at the public library Inconvenient / easier to get another way 22% Didnt know I could / didnt know library offered e-books19 Dont use library / no library nearby8 No interest / no real need7 Just found out about it / havent had a chance to try it yet6 E-books still new to me / no time to learn5 Just never thought to5 Dont read a lot / dont use e-reader much4 Prefer to own my own copy4 My library doesnt offer e-books4 Prefer print books3 Poor e-book selection at library2 Do not have format I need2 Cumbersome process / wait list / short borrowing period2 Other6 What is the main reason you do not borrow e-books from your public library? Among e-book readers who do not get e-books at the public library

56 Among those who do not currently borrow e-books from libraries, the % who say they would be likely to…

57 All three ideas are most popular with: African-Americans and Hispanics Those under age 65 Those in households making less than $30k per year Those who had not completed high school Parents of minor children

58 What these changes [could] mean for libraries

59 Our customers are still using the library but in different ways. They browse our catalog online, place reserves on the items they want, then pick them up at their location of choice. Many fewer browse the collection in person, – E-book-borrowing patron

60 People are asking for digital content. Anything digital. They are hungry for it. – Library staff member

61 We spend a significant part of our day explaining how to get library books onto e-book readers. – Library staff member

62 The greatest change has been the need not only for computer access, but computer assistance. – Library staff member

63 It all feels pretty murky. Some clarity and good advice would be nice. Its OK for libraries with big budgets to plunge into e- book readers. As a small library with limited collection funds, we have to be more careful. – Library staff member

64 Aggregator/ Synthesizer OrganizerNetwork nodeFacilitator Imagining thelibrarian of the future

65 Our library is a critical link in our community. It provides access to books, computers, [and] knowledge, and is a critical social center. – E-book-borrowing patron

66 RESEARCH TIMELINE Stage II (May-November 2012) The changing world of library services The evolving role of libraries in communities – New library services – Peoples expectations of libraries – The library of the future The role of libraries in the life of special populations – Lower-income users, minorities, rural residents, senior citizens

67 RESEARCH TIMELINE Stage III (Sept. 2012–April 2013) A closer analysis of who does – and does not – use libraries A library user typology – Different user types based on: What their local libraries are like How they use libraries Attitudes about libraries in general An updated, in-depth portrait of how teens & young adults use libraries

68 Thank you! Kathryn Zickuhr Research Specialist Pew Internet & American @pewresearch All data, slides, and reports available at pewinternet.org


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